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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 18, 2011 | By Kate Mather, Los Angeles Times
June gloom might not be the only thing keeping people away from beaches in the South Bay this weekend. Swarms of black kelp flies — scientifically known as Coelopa frigida — have invaded beaches in Torrance, Redondo Beach, Manhattan Beach and Hermosa Beach, covering trash cans and lifeguard stands and annoying visitors. Though the flies are typically found in Redondo Beach near the rock-laden Topaz Street jetty, lifeguards said, there are definitely more this year.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SCIENCE
January 16, 2014 | By Louis Sahagun
The canopies of kelp undulating in the surges off the coast of California camouflage a complex ecosystem of sharks, rock fish, crabs, urchins and anemones that blossom like colorful flowers on the forest floor. Now, Steven L. Manley, a biology professor at Cal State Long Beach, and Kai Vetter, head of applied nuclear physics at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, have launched a campaign to monitor those groves for radioactive contaminants due to arrive later this year in ocean currents from Japan's damaged Fukushima nuclear power plant.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 16, 2010 | By Mike Anton
Surfing's dirty secret is easy to find in the drab enclave of San Clemente known as the surf ghetto, where the ocean breeze is spiked with the sweet smell of chemicals and men wearing flip-flops and coated with white dust search for magic inside blocks of toxic foam. Joey Santley is looking for something equally elusive: an environmentally friendly surfboard. Or at least one with a carbon footprint that's less titanic. "A 'green surfboard' is inherently an oxymoron at this point," said Santley, 44, a frenetic surfboard shaper and entrepreneur.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 12, 2013 | Tony Barboza
Below the gently rolling waves off the Palos Verdes Peninsula, a spiny purple menace is ravaging what should be a thriving kelp forest. Millions of sea urchins -- scrawny, diseased and desperate for food -- have overrun a band of the shallow seafloor, devouring kelp and crowding out most all other life at a time the giant green foliage is making a comeback elsewhere along the California coast. In an effort to remedy the situation, scientists and divers will spend the next five years culling the urchins from more than 152 acres of coastal waters degraded years ago by pollution.
NEWS
October 10, 1996
Beset by factions warring over kelp and wetlands, the California Coastal Commission this week postponed a final decision whether to relax requirements intended to offset damage to the marine environment near the San Onofre nuclear power plant.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 23, 1997 | JENNIFER LEUER
Scott Raiche's marine diving students enviously ask him what it was like to dive in the kelp forests that flourished off Orange County's coastline until about 10 years ago. With the near disappearance of the amber forests because of warmer water and overfishing, Raiche's diving students in the North Orange County Regional Occupation Program see the hundreds of fish and other creatures that live in kelp reefs only when the students travel to Santa Catalina Island.
SPORTS
May 3, 1989 | PETE THOMAS, Times Staff Writer
To the average beach-goer, kelp is anything but glamorous. In large clumps, it regularly washes ashore, where it rots and draws flies. But to a diver, or anyone else who has ever seen its healthy fronds rising from the ocean floor, an amber gold flowing with the currents, occasionally interrupting the sun's penetrating rays, kelp is something to behold. "If you see it from underwater, it's actually a gigantic forest, as complex as the tropical rain forest that you see, or used to see, in Brazil," said Ken Wilson, a biologist for the Department of Fish and Game who has worked extensively with kelp for several years.
BUSINESS
December 25, 1989 | CHARLES HILLINGER
While Mendocino County's seaweed farmers wrung $73,000 in sales from the ocean in 1989, San Diego-based Kelco was harvesting millions of dollars in giant kelp. Kelco, a division of pharmaceuticals giant Merck & Co., is the largest company of its kind in the world. It has three 140- to 180-foot ships, kelp cutters that mow the tops off the fastest-growing and tallest plants in the ocean. This seaweed, however, isn't harvested to be eaten.
NEWS
February 8, 1992 | GREG JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The massive sewage spill off Point Loma threatens catastrophe for several local businesses whose livelihoods are tied to giant offshore kelp beds. Already, one small but specialized enterprise has been hard-hit by the spill: divers' plucking of sea urchins to be turned into sushi. "We're not buying from off Point Loma until this thing is cleared," said Dave Rudie, spokesman for Catalina Offshore Products, which processes the divers' catch for market in the United States and Japan.
NEWS
July 3, 1991 | AMY WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nearly two years after a 15-year, $46-million study found that the San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station is breaking federal law by killing tons of fish and kelp, the California Coastal Commission staff has recommended a solution. In a 60-page report, which the commission will consider at a public hearing July 16, the staff rejected an option favored by environmentalists: the building of cooling towers to reduce the amount of sea water--and marine life--sucked into the plant.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 3, 2011 | By Tony Barboza, Los Angeles Times
As reliably as masses of sea bass gather off the Southern California coast each summer, boatloads of anglers arrive to reel them in. But their bountiful catches are an illusion, scientists say. The populations of kelp bass and barred sand bass, two of the most popular — and easy to catch — saltwater fishes in Southern California, have plummeted 90% since 1980, according to a study led by a researcher at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 18, 2011 | By Kate Mather, Los Angeles Times
June gloom might not be the only thing keeping people away from beaches in the South Bay this weekend. Swarms of black kelp flies — scientifically known as Coelopa frigida — have invaded beaches in Torrance, Redondo Beach, Manhattan Beach and Hermosa Beach, covering trash cans and lifeguard stands and annoying visitors. Though the flies are typically found in Redondo Beach near the rock-laden Topaz Street jetty, lifeguards said, there are definitely more this year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 7, 2011 | By Tony Barboza, Los Angeles Times
It was a gamble when Southern California Edison crews pushed basketball-size chunks of rock from a barge off San Clemente three years ago. Eventually, the utility company hoped, the artificial reef it had assembled 50 feet below the waves would support a new kelp forest and fulfill state-imposed requirements to offset the damage its nearby nuclear power plant causes to marine life. Photos: Thriving kelp forest rises from a rock reef But no one expected the 174-acre Wheeler North Reef would thrive the way it has. Or as quickly.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 16, 2010 | By Mike Anton
Surfing's dirty secret is easy to find in the drab enclave of San Clemente known as the surf ghetto, where the ocean breeze is spiked with the sweet smell of chemicals and men wearing flip-flops and coated with white dust search for magic inside blocks of toxic foam. Joey Santley is looking for something equally elusive: an environmentally friendly surfboard. Or at least one with a carbon footprint that's less titanic. "A 'green surfboard' is inherently an oxymoron at this point," said Santley, 44, a frenetic surfboard shaper and entrepreneur.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 2010
"Whoa! That's so cool!" Julian Guzman shrieked as he spotted an image of wingless midge larvae. Guzman, 9, was joined Tuesday by his fellow third-grade classmates from 32nd Street School for a sneak peak at the new permanent exhibition wing, Ecosystems, at the California Science Center in Exposition Park. "We're encouraging people to notice the science that exists all around them -- to look beyond these walls to notice and explore out in the real world," said Jeffrey N. Rudolph, president and chief executive of the California Science Center.
NATIONAL
December 5, 2009 | By Bob Drogin
Paul Dobbins and Tollef Olson admit they still have a kink in their scheme to use seaweed to revolutionize American eating habits, clean the environment, lower the federal trade deficit and make themselves fabulously rich. Call it the yuck factor. "It tastes better than it looks," said Olson, holding a shimmering frond of brown horsetail kelp he had just plucked from the cold gray waters of Casco Bay. "Really." Dobbins and Olson run what is believed to be America's only commercial kelp farm.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 7, 1996 | DEBORAH SCHOCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They thrive unseen and silent off the California coast, these amber-toned kelp forests that teem with a rich bounty of marine life. Among some ocean enthusiasts, giant kelp communities are viewed with the same reverence as ancient redwood forests. So when a kelp bed off San Onofre seemed to be failing mysteriously, alarmed scientists sprang into action. Their conclusion: Kelp was being killed by murky water from a nearby nuclear power plant.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 9, 1998 | DEBORAH SCHOCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Southern California Edison has fallen behind schedule in a massive state-ordered program to build a giant kelp reef and restore wetlands to compensate for years of ocean damage caused by the San Onofre nuclear plant. Less than 15 months after the state set a strict timetable for the long-awaited projects, the wetlands restoration is lagging six months behind deadline.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 12, 2008 | Susannah Rosenblatt, Times Staff Writer
Rocks bigger than basketballs were pushed into the ocean off San Clemente this week to provide the foundation for a 150-acre reef for giant kelp -- a project scientists say is one of the largest and most advanced in the world. The artificial reef, to be made from roughly 125,000 tons of volcanic rock, is designed to anchor a swaying kelp forest, attract an array of marine creatures and help counteract the environmental destruction wrought by a nearby nuclear power plant.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 2008 | Joe Mozingo, Times Staff Writer
Jefferson "Zuma Jay" Wagner sails up Latigo Canyon Road in his Dodge minivan. He is complaining about the "beautiful people" marring Malibu with their egos -- building colossal homes on this iconic stretch of coast. He has a wry, low-lidded gaze and bears such an uncanny resemblance to Clint Eastwood that he once did a beer commercial in Japan as Dirty Harry. His van has 275,000 miles on it and smells of unwashed wetsuits. "I have a mega-mansion myself, 4,000 square feet," he says.
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