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SPORTS
July 5, 1993 | EARL GUSTKEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
From the hillside cemetery, you can look down, through the rows of red cedar and palms, upon much of San Bernardino and Colton. One recent day, Keith Hubbs stood near his brother's grave, and pointed out that it was a rare, crystal-clear afternoon. Looking north, the snow-capped San Bernardino mountains framed the spectacular setting. "It was like this the day we buried Kenny," he said. "Except the wind blew so hard at his funeral.
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SPORTS
February 13, 1999
Even now, after 35 years, reading the stories of the death of one of baseball's great young players brings back the numbness that swept over Southern California sports followers at the time. Ken Hubbs, a 22-year-old Chicago Cub second baseman, and a friend died shortly after taking off from Provo, Utah, when their small plane crashed onto frozen Utah Lake. To those who knew Hubbs in his hometown, Colton, it was impossible to believe.
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SPORTS
February 13, 1999
Even now, after 35 years, reading the stories of the death of one of baseball's great young players brings back the numbness that swept over Southern California sports followers at the time. Ken Hubbs, a 22-year-old Chicago Cub second baseman, and a friend died shortly after taking off from Provo, Utah, when their small plane crashed onto frozen Utah Lake. To those who knew Hubbs in his hometown, Colton, it was impossible to believe.
SPORTS
July 5, 1993 | EARL GUSTKEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
From the hillside cemetery, you can look down, through the rows of red cedar and palms, upon much of San Bernardino and Colton. One recent day, Keith Hubbs stood near his brother's grave, and pointed out that it was a rare, crystal-clear afternoon. Looking north, the snow-capped San Bernardino mountains framed the spectacular setting. "It was like this the day we buried Kenny," he said. "Except the wind blew so hard at his funeral.
SPORTS
September 7, 2011 | By Houston Mitchell
Notable athletes who have died in a plane crash: Oct. 18, 1925 -- Marvin Goodwin, Cincinnati Reds pitcher. Goodwin was one of the 17 pitchers allowed to continue throwing the spitball after it was outlawed in 1920. He died in Houston after crash-landing his plane in a training exercise with the Army Air Reserve. Believed to be the first pro athlete killed in a plane crash. May 4, 1949 -- 22 members of the Torino soccer club. The entire team was killed when its plane crashed into a mountain near Torino, Italy, near the end of league play in Serie A, which immediately canceled the rest of the season and declared Torino the champions.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 14, 2000
Re "Coach Hangs Tough at Plate," May 4: The story of Victor Barrios, a paraplegic wheelchair-bound baseball coach winning his discrimination claim against the California Interscholastic Federation, is heartwarming though not unique. In 1955, Eulis Hubbs, a victim of adult polio, coached the Colton Little League All Star team from his wheelchair to a berth in the finals of the Little League World Series. For several years before and many years thereafter, Hubbs was well-known in the baseball coaching ranks of the Inland Empire.
SPORTS
November 9, 1989 | From Associated Press
Jerome Walton and Dwight Smith of the Chicago Cubs Wednesday became the first teammates to finish 1-2 in National League rookie-of-the-year voting since 1957. Walton was the clear favorite of the Baseball Writers Assn. of America panel, getting 22 of the 24 first-place votes and a total of 116 points. Smith had the other two first-place votes and 68 points. "I'm glad I won it and I'm glad he's the runner-up," Walton said at a news conference in Chicago.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 26, 1987
A San Diego Police Department SWAT team member on Friday shot and killed a man who had barricaded himself inside an Encanto home and threatened two women with a carving knife. The three-hour stand-off began shortly after 10:30 a.m. when a KGTV (Channel 10) reporter received a telephone call from a highly agitated man who said he was going to kill his roommate and then himself. The reporter got the man's address and notified police, police spokesman Bill Robinson said.
SPORTS
April 24, 1999 | EARL GUSTKEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He could knock down a barn door with the velocity on his fastball. Problem was, for years, Sandy Koufax couldn't hit a barn door. But by the early 1960s, in Los Angeles, Koufax had finally figured out how to throw strikes. When he did that, every hitter in the National League was tempted to call in sick on days he was scheduled to pitch. Thirty-seven years ago today in Chicago, Koufax struck out 18 batters in a game for the second time.
SPORTS
December 30, 1999 | EARL GUSTKEY, NEWPORT HARBOR HIGH, CLASS OF 1958
High school sports serve as a rite of passage for the athletes who play them, the student, friends and families that gather to watch them and the sportswriters who cut their professional teeth covering them. High school football games in Los Angeles date to 1896, but it wasn't until 1934 that the Los Angeles City Section was born. The Southern Section was established in 1912 and held its first athletic competition in 1913.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 10, 2007 | Ashraf Khalil, Times Staff Writer
Army Sgt. Clayton G. Dunn II grew up knowing he wanted to be a soldier. The Moreno Valley native, who was killed May 26 in Iraq, was a second-generation soldier whose father, Roy, served in the Army for 22 years. "He was brought up that way," said Dunn's wife, Haidy. "Ever since he was little, he would play in his dad's boots and helmet." That helmet became a part of a memorial, with a white cross, flags and flowers, erected on the lawn of his parents' home.
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