Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsKen Kragen
IN THE NEWS

Ken Kragen

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
November 24, 1985 | DENNIS McDOUGAL
In six months and a day, Ken Kragen and his USA for Africa Foundation plan to stretch a 4,000-mile human chain across the nation. But, they learned the other day to their displeasure, it isn't the first time for such an ambitious publicity stunt. Hands Across America was tried before and--despite employing the same name, a year's worth of planning and massive publicity--it failed. The best that organizer Marvin J.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 2005 | Elaine Dutka, Times Staff Writer
For all its luster, the entertainment business is fraught with peril, and industry veteran Ken Kragen takes solace in a line from Thornton Wilder's "The Skin of Our Teeth": "I know that every good and excellent thing in the world stands moment by moment on the razor-edge of danger and must be fought for."
Advertisement
NEWS
October 18, 1985 | JODY JACOBS, Times Society Editor
Ken Kragen, the personal manager and producer, stopped short in front of the barrage of cameras waiting for him as he entered the VIP reception area at the Beverly Hilton. His clients--among them Kenny Rogers and Lionel Richie--are used to the kind of attention Kragen has been getting since he organized the USA for Africa project. For him it seems surprising and perhaps a little overwhelming.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 7, 1992 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Peace, at Last: "The Tonight Show" has put out the welcome mat for Travis Tritt and Trisha Yearwood, the country musicians whose earlier ban was made public by their manager, causing a ruckus that led to the dismissal of the show's executive producer. Yearwood has been penciled in for Dec. 2 and Tritt for early next year to coincide with the airing of a CBS movie in which he co-stars.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 1985
Ken Kragen, the celebrity manager who organized the U.S.A. for Africa famine song recording, will receive the National Academy of Video Arts and Sciences' Humanitarian Award, the academy announced. Jennifer Libbee, the academy's executive director, said Kragen will receive the award during the group's 3rd annual American Video Awards ceremonies Wednesday at the Santa Monica Civic Auditorium.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 14, 1985
Bob Geldof is a compassionate man. It was his compassion for Ethiopian famine victims that prompted him to organize the English Band Aid record, and also pushed U.S. artists to act in behalf of Africa's starving. It is time people stop pitting USA for Africa against its British predecessor (Calendar Letters, April 7). That's what Geldof did when he joined hands with Ken Kragen and Harry Belafonte at the "We Are the World" recording session. England, America, what does it matter?
ENTERTAINMENT
November 3, 1985
Compassion. Let's see if I've got this right (" 'Hands' to Reach Out to American Hungry," by Dennis McDougal, Oct. 23). If I send $10 to Ken Kragen, president of HandsAcrossAmerica, he'll let me stand somewhere in the Mojave Desert at high noon and advertise Coca-Cola while holding hands with two people I've never met and singing "America the Beautiful"? If I send $35 he'll throw in a T-shirt emblazoned with the logo "HAA." It's an attractive offer, and I'm tempted to go for it; but I've got a better plan.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 7, 1992 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Peace, at Last: "The Tonight Show" has put out the welcome mat for Travis Tritt and Trisha Yearwood, the country musicians whose earlier ban was made public by their manager, causing a ruckus that led to the dismissal of the show's executive producer. Yearwood has been penciled in for Dec. 2 and Tritt for early next year to coincide with the airing of a CBS movie in which he co-stars.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 9, 1985 | From the Associated Press
Prince, Linda Ronstadt and Pat Benatar have agreed to contribute songs to the forthcoming "USA for Africa" album, dedicated to alleviating starvation in Ethiopia and other African nations, organizers said. None of the three pop stars participated in a recording session with Bruce Springsteen, Michael Jackson, Cyndi Lauper and 42 other musicians that was held after the American Music Awards show last week. The session produced a single, "We Are the World," written by Jackson and Lionel Richie.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 1985 | ROBERT HILBURN
An hour documentary on the making of the "We Are the World" benefit single will debut May 1 on Home Box Office and will be shown exclusively on the cable service eight times that month. Michael Fuchs, HBO chairman and chief executive officer, and Ken Kragen, who spearheaded the recording project to aid African famine victims, said the program features highlights of the 10-hour recording session and interviews.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 21, 1992 | LEE MARGULIES, TIMES TELEVISION EDITOR
Worried about a growing rift between "The Tonight Show" and the entertainment industry on which it depends for guests, NBC is considering changing the management of television's premiere late-night series. At stake is the future of executive producer Helen Kushnick, a longtime associate of "Tonight Show" host Jay Leno. In an unusual statement, NBC declared late Friday that it is "considering modifications to the show's management structure."
ENTERTAINMENT
September 15, 1992 | DANIEL CERONE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Country artist Travis Tritt has been banned permanently from "The Tonight Show," according to his manager, Ken Kragen, because Kragen would not cancel Tritt's scheduled November appearance on "The Arsenio Hall Show" to do the NBC program instead.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 18, 1991 | ROBERT EPSTEIN
Some sang. Others danced. Most wore T-shirt declarations. A few stood at the edges before joining the line. A few backed away. . . . And whose hands were you holding that Sunday five years ago? May 25, 1986, Hands Across America, and the great public relations, social commitment, celebrity-supported event was the unifying yellow-ribbon spectacular of the '80s. For almost 5.5 million Americans, that Sunday produced 15 minutes of fame and eventually $16 million for spending on hunger issues.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 1989 | PAUL GREIN
They're calling it one of the most expensive music videos ever made--a whopping $600,000 for a 5 1/2-minute clip. It's got to be something from Madonna, right? Or maybe Michael Jackson or Def Leppard--a mega-platinum MTV mainstay. Guess again. This huge outlay is for an artist whose last two albums didn't even crack the national Top 100 and whose videos have rarely gotten past the MTV reception desk. The video maker: Kenny Rogers. The clip--to promote "Planet Texas," his first single for Reprise Records--will premiere on Rogers' May 20 NBC-TV special.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 18, 1986 | DENNIS McDOUGAL and VICTOR VALLE, Times Staff Writers
What if you threw a mega-event and nobody knew about it? It was called Sport Aid and, with an estimated 20 million participants around the world on May 25, it dwarfed Hands Across America in scope, purpose and achievement. The Sport Aid spectacle was televised live, via satellite, at a cost of $600,000, to a potential audience of 750 million in 80 countries. The radio audience was believed to be nearly 2 billion. Ken Kragen's incredible attempt to get 5.
NEWS
May 28, 1986 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, Times Staff Writer
About one month after the historic linking of hands across the country, the official "Hands Across America" book will be published, commemorating what Pocket Books has dubbed "the world's largest participatory event." Scheduled to be on sale June 25, the 8-by-10-inch trade paperback will be titled simply "Hands Across America" and will carry no single byline or attribution. After expenses, Pocket Books said that all proceeds of the nonprofit, $7.95 book will be donated to Hands Across America.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 14, 1985
While not saying so directly, Dennis McDougal's article seems critical of the speed with which USA for Africa is spending the dollars it has raised ("The Famine Tour," July 7). Frankly, this is a very fair criticism and one about which I have been continuously concerned. The pressure to spend it fast is enormous, but I believe it is over-ridden by our responsibility to spend it right. One of the things we learned on our trip is that $50,000,000 is a very limited sum when applied to the vast problems Africa is facing.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 1986 | Patrick Goldstein
Joe Cerisano and Sandy Farina are the most prominent of a chorus of vocalists featured on the new "Hands Across America" theme song from EMI Records--but you wouldn't know it from the back cover credits. Though the multitude of musicians performing are individually credited, Cerisano and Farina, who make a living doing jingles and commercials, are lumped in with the other singers--and listed en masse as the "Voices of America."
ENTERTAINMENT
April 8, 1986 | DAVID CROOK, Times Staff Writer
Queue up, America. If, before May 25, you drink soda pop, eat hamburgers, shop at supermarkets, use credit cards, wear shoes, stroll shopping malls, go to school, attend church services or drop a few bucks on a diamond bracelet, then the odds are that someone's going to tell you to take a spot on the line.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|