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Ken Singleton

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ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 1999 | DEVRA MAZA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
I have this fantasy about Joe Morgan: I'm at a baseball game, sitting behind home plate. Greg Maddux is pitching and Joe's sitting next to me, telling me every pitch he's throwing and why. Joe feels the same way--when he broadcasts a game. "My philosophy is that I'm sitting next to you at home and I'm trying to explain to you why things happen and we're having a conversation. " That philosophy has helped the Hall of Famer make the seamless transition from being one of the best in the game to one of the best in the booth.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 1999 | DEVRA MAZA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
I have this fantasy about Joe Morgan: I'm at a baseball game, sitting behind home plate. Greg Maddux is pitching and Joe's sitting next to me, telling me every pitch he's throwing and why. Joe feels the same way--when he broadcasts a game. "My philosophy is that I'm sitting next to you at home and I'm trying to explain to you why things happen and we're having a conversation. " That philosophy has helped the Hall of Famer make the seamless transition from being one of the best in the game to one of the best in the booth.
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SPORTS
September 4, 1998 | FERNANDO DOMINGUEZ
Only a few months removed from the Big West Conference, Cal State Northridge running back Melvin Blue is about to get one more taste of it. When the Matadors open the season with a nonconference game at Division I-A Boise State on Saturday night, Blue will return to the blue artificial turf at Bronco Stadium. Blue, a senior, played at Big West member Utah State the last three years. The Aggies lost to Cincinnati, 35-19, in the Humanitarian Bowl at Bronco Stadium on Dec. 29, 1997.
SPORTS
June 2, 2004 | Larry Stewart, Times Staff Writer
One night when Chick Hearn was working on "Chick: His Unpublished Memoirs and the Memories of Those Who Knew Him," Marge Hearn looked over his shoulder. "What are you doing?" he asked. "I want to see what it looks like," Marge said. "You'll have to wait and buy the book," Chick responded. "That way, at least I know I'll sell one copy." The book has sold more than one copy. This week it made The Times' bestseller list for sales in the Southland, coming in at No. 12 among nonfiction books.
SPORTS
July 1, 1995 | EARL GUSTKEY
Remember when Los Angeles used to claim the "Sports Capital of America" title--back when Sandy Koufax and the Dodgers were filling Dodger Stadium, the Rams were a hot ticket at the Coliseum, when even track meets were drawing 60,000? Miami Herald columnist Greg Cote recently employed a complicated formula to arrive at a ranking of the country's top sports cities. And the winner is . . . Detroit? Right. L.A. came in eighth.
SPORTS
June 7, 2001 | Mal Florence
Tony Kornheiser of the Washington Post, writing before the start of the Laker-76er NBA Finals: "Please, Philadelphia, win one game. I understand winning even one is a lot to ask--winning four is probably out of the question. "[Though I love that 'David and Goliath' bit Larry Brown is peddling; the only drawback is that Shaq is so big he'd reach out, grab the slingshot and then eat it! And then where are you?] "One game is all I ask.
SPORTS
July 21, 1995 | SHAV GLICK
Jeannine Pelletier hit a golf shot that ricocheted off abandoned railroad tracks and hit her on the nose--and collected a $40,000 judgment from the Ft. Kent Golf Club in Maine. The Maine Supreme Court's opinion said, "Although the tracks are not under the club's absolute control, the club's duty extends to land which it has invited golfers to use."
SPORTS
March 31, 1998 | MAL FLORENCE
At 15, former pitcher Joe Nuxhall was the youngest player to appear in a major league game. Sports Collectors Digest recently ran an ad listing one of his old jerseys for sale. The ad said, "Joe's amazing feat was brought to light again last year after his untimely death." Nuxhall, however, continues to broadcast Cincinnati Reds' games on radio. And he isn't getting any sympathy from broadcast partner Marty Brennaman. "If Joe's dead, that explains a lot," Brennaman said.
SPORTS
August 20, 1994 | JEFF FLETCHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Had Steve Chilcott only broken for third base 27 years ago, he might not be building houses today. It would have seemed boneheaded at the time: a slow-footed catcher running for third after the pitcher made a pickoff throw to second. But, given what happened when Chilcott's right arm slammed back into the second-base bag, popping his shoulder loose, the foolhardy play probably would have been wiser.
NEWS
September 4, 1993 | DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Escalating their efforts to rebut criticism of the proposed North American Free Trade Agreement with Mexico and Canada, the Clinton Administration released a letter Friday in which 283 leading economists agree that the pact "will be a net positive for the United States, both in terms of employment creation and overall economic growth."
SPORTS
June 10, 1992 | From Associated Press
Candy Maldonado knew he hit the ball hard, he just didn't realize how hard. Maldonado hit one of the longest home runs in the history of the new Yankee Stadium and also snapped a seventh-inning tie with a double as the Toronto Blue Jays defeated the stumbling New York Yankees, 2-1, Tuesday night. "I saw Roberto Kelly taking off and then I wasn't sure," Maldonado said. "It's a long way in this park." Kelly never had a chance.
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