Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsKendall Hailey
IN THE NEWS

Kendall Hailey

MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
March 6, 1988 | ITABARI NJERI, Times Staff Writer
Like Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Kendall Hailey believes that school, not war, is hell. When Hailey was 15, the aspiring novelist, fledgling actress and eldest child in a remarkable, idiosyncratic family decided to graduate from high school early, nix college--which she considered suicide-inducing--and become an autodidact: a self-taught person. Joining the legendary autodidacts before her--George Washington, Abraham Lincoln, H. L. Mencken, Amelia Earhart, Eleanor Roosevelt, John D.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BOOKS
March 3, 1991
I am writing in regards to (Judith Freeman's) review of my mother's new novel, "Home Free" (Feb. 3). I am not writing in defense of my mother (Elizabeth Forsythe Hailey). A daughter's viewpoint is not considered objective--though it has always seemed to me much more difficult to earn your daughter's respect than a stranger's. I am writing instead in defense of the homeless. "Home Free" is about a woman who takes in a homeless family. To call it "preposterous" lets everyone off the hook.
Advertisement
NEWS
March 20, 1988
Kendall Hailey's role as defiant autodidact and midnight writer within the walls of the family compound seems romantic indeed ("The Unconventional World of Kendall Hailey" by Itabari Njeri, March 6). In such a secluded environment, it is easy to become seduced by charming words such as "autodidacticism." How fortunate that the word that charmed her was not necrophilia or Machiavellianism. She has missed entirely, however, the point of a good liberal-arts college education.
NEWS
February 25, 1989 | DENNIS McLELLAN, Times Staff Writer
One woman in the audience jokingly told Kendall Hailey: "I'm almost terrified to take your book home. I know my 14-year-old will think it's wonderful to just get a lot of books and sit on the beach." Hailey, the author of "The Day I Became an Autodidact"--a chronicle of her decision to forgo college and instead follow the example of such legendary "self-taught" persons as Abraham Lincoln, Virginia Woolf and George Bernard Shaw--peered through owlish glasses and grinned broadly.
BOOKS
March 3, 1991
I am writing in regards to (Judith Freeman's) review of my mother's new novel, "Home Free" (Feb. 3). I am not writing in defense of my mother (Elizabeth Forsythe Hailey). A daughter's viewpoint is not considered objective--though it has always seemed to me much more difficult to earn your daughter's respect than a stranger's. I am writing instead in defense of the homeless. "Home Free" is about a woman who takes in a homeless family. To call it "preposterous" lets everyone off the hook.
NEWS
February 25, 1989 | DENNIS McLELLAN, Times Staff Writer
One woman in the audience jokingly told Kendall Hailey: "I'm almost terrified to take your book home. I know my 14-year-old will think it's wonderful to just get a lot of books and sit on the beach." Hailey, the author of "The Day I Became an Autodidact"--a chronicle of her decision to forgo college and instead follow the example of such legendary "self-taught" persons as Abraham Lincoln, Virginia Woolf and George Bernard Shaw--peered through owlish glasses and grinned broadly.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 5, 1997 | SHARON BERNSTEIN
Elizabeth Forsythe Hailey, author of "A Woman of Independent Means" and "Joanna's Husband and David's Wife," has called Studio City home for 30 years. Hailey and her late husband, the playwright Oliver Hailey, bought a ranch house in 1967, after moving here to see Oliver's play "Who's Happy Now?" performed during the inaugural season of the Mark Taper Forum in Los Angeles. These days, the author divides her time between Southern California and the south coast of England.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 20, 1992 | RAY LOYND, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Ancient Greek tragedies are rarely staged in small theater--and basically never in our large houses--because they're intimidating to audiences and they demand a rhetorical and visceral passion daunting to most actors and directors. One experience with a Greek classic you would not regret is the stinging, moody evocation of the suffering of a captured city in director John Neville's production of Euripides' "The Trojan Women," exceptionally produced by the L.A.
NEWS
September 16, 1994 | T.H. McCULLOH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; T. H. McCulloh writes regularly about theater for The Times.
Rosie Taravella's "The Wives," at Ventura Court Theatre, looks an awful lot like a pilot for a TV sitcom. But there's a little bit more to it than that and, in its final scene, a little bit less. The setup is simple. The husbands, all employees of Blake Advertising, are off for their annual fishing trip. Nancy Clancy decides the wives should get together for a first annual luncheon just to get to know one another, and for various covert other reasons.
NEWS
March 20, 1988
Kendall Hailey's role as defiant autodidact and midnight writer within the walls of the family compound seems romantic indeed ("The Unconventional World of Kendall Hailey" by Itabari Njeri, March 6). In such a secluded environment, it is easy to become seduced by charming words such as "autodidacticism." How fortunate that the word that charmed her was not necrophilia or Machiavellianism. She has missed entirely, however, the point of a good liberal-arts college education.
NEWS
March 6, 1988 | ITABARI NJERI, Times Staff Writer
Like Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Kendall Hailey believes that school, not war, is hell. When Hailey was 15, the aspiring novelist, fledgling actress and eldest child in a remarkable, idiosyncratic family decided to graduate from high school early, nix college--which she considered suicide-inducing--and become an autodidact: a self-taught person. Joining the legendary autodidacts before her--George Washington, Abraham Lincoln, H. L. Mencken, Amelia Earhart, Eleanor Roosevelt, John D.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 1986 | DAN SULLIVAN, Times Theater Critic
Bar talk: Are you meeting someone here? What sign are you? My funny Valentine, sweet comic Valentine . . . . See that woman near the piano? That used to be Frances Carson. "The Bar Off Melrose" is fun, even when it falters. The original idea was to find a format to bind together a series of sketches written by members of Oliver Hailey's playwrights' lab.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 7, 1988 | SYLVIE DRAKE and DON SHIRLEY
The Santa Barbara Theatre Festival will spend more time in San Francisco than in Santa Barbara this season. The festival will export three productions--including the "She Loves Me" that played Santa Barbara and the Ahmanson last year--to San Francisco's Geary Theatre, winter home of the American Conservatory Theatre. But Southland audiences need not go north, or at least that far north, to see the festival.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|