Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsKenneth Branagh
IN THE NEWS

Kenneth Branagh

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
June 18, 2012 | By David Ng
That's "Sir" Kenneth Branagh and "Dame" Zaha Hadid, to you. The birthday honors for Britain's Queen Elizabeth II were announced recently, and among those receiving titles will be actor-director Branagh, a Shakespearean veteran of stage and screen, and architect Hadid, who has won the Pritzker Prize and whose buildings include the London Olympics' Aquatic Centre. Branagh will receive a knighthood for his contributions to drama as well as to the community of his native Northern Ireland.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
January 16, 2014 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
We all know you can't tell a book by its cover, but can you tell a film by its release date? Where "Jack Ryan: Shadow Recruit," is concerned, that becomes a bit of a trick question. A glance at the calendar reminds us that this tale of espionage and derring-do starring Chris Pine as CIA analyst Jack Ryan is coming to theaters in January, the traditional elephant burial ground for major studio releases. But before "The Wolf of Wall Street" dislodged it into 2014, "Jack Ryan" possessed a coveted Christmas slot all its own. So is this film a holiday gem slumming in the low-rent district, or a tawdry impostor stripped of ideas above its station?
Advertisement
NEWS
November 17, 2011 | By Amy Dawes, Special to the Los Angeles Times
"My Week With Marilyn," from director Simon Curtis, is a memoir of the unlikely relationship between the vulnerable screen legend (played by Michelle Williams) and a smitten young assistant, Colin Clark (Eddie Redmayne), on the London set of the 1956 movie "The Prince and the Showgirl. " Kenneth Branagh plays British acting great Laurence Olivier, who directed the picture and starred opposite Monroe. The old master and the insecure young actress prove to be a combustible match-up; Olivier is ready to kill her from the first day. To play the great Shakespearean is a daunting assignment, but Branagh, who like Olivier has directed and starred in many film versions of the Bard's works, is particularly well-matched.
NEWS
December 19, 2013 | By Gina McIntyre
Tom Hiddleston is currently starring on the London stage in Shakespeare's political tragedy “Coriolanus,” and reviews of the production, which opened Dec. 17, have been glowing. Critics have praised Hiddleston's performance -- the Telegraph's Charles Spencer called him “compelling and persuasive” -- as the military commander brought low by his own arrogance and intractability in the play, directed by Josie Rourke, at the Donmar Warehouse. Earlier this year, Hiddleston was promoting a starring turn of a very different kind in “Thor: The Dark World,” the Marvel superhero sequel in which he reprised his role as the raven-haired villain Loki from “Thor” and “The Avengers.” The 32-year-old actor talked about his interest in the role -- "Coriolanus" is generally considered one of the Bard's less accessible works -- and his personal relationship to the Donmar.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 10, 2013 | By Deborah Vankin
After a trip to Amsterdam in the summer of 2008, Los Angeles Times music critic Mark Swed brought back a curious souvenir: a three-disc Dutch edition of Kenneth Branagh's "The Magic Flute,” which he'd spotted in a remote record-store window. Upon returning home, he watched the 2006 film adaptation of Mozart's opera and was so moved that he wrote: “I am at a loss to understand why this film has been marginalized. 'Flute' is a joy.” The Branagh film, updating the opera from 1791 to World War I, premiered at the Toronto and Venice International Film Festivals and had limited overseas runs; but it has never showed in the U.S. -- until now. PHOTOS: Hollywood stars on stage On June 9, the Branagh-directed “Flute” is scheduled to screen at about 150 Emerging Pictures theaters across the country.
NEWS
April 26, 1992 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Kenneth Branagh has been referred to as the next Laurence Olivier or the new Orson Welles. But the 31-year-old actor-director-writer-producer has a talent, style and vision uniquely his own. They were all evident in Branagh's 1989 adaptation of Shakespeare's "Henry V," for which he received Oscar nominations for best actor and best director. Forty-five years earlier, Olivier made his directorial debut and received an Oscar nomination for best actor for his adaptation of "Henry V."
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 1993 | Terry Pristin
Uncredited performances are not unheard-of in Hollywood, but usually the role involved is little more than a cameo. In "Dead Again," for example, Robin Williams does a turn as a doctor but is not listed in the credits. But audiences who stick around for the end credits of "Swing Kids," a Disney release opening Friday, may be struck by a curious omission. The name Kenneth Branagh is never seen, even though the British actor has a substantial role.
BOOKS
June 17, 1990 | CHRIS GOODRICH
Kenneth Branagh--newly famous in the United States for his film "Henry V"--is brash to the very center of his being, but his vaulting ambition proves endearing; he immediately admits that while at 28 he knows little worth repeating, he's happy to take the money offered for his autobiography to help subsidize his Renaissance Theatre Company.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 17, 2002 | Rachel Abramowitz
Kenneth Branagh might be better known for his portrayal of Shakespeare's greats, from Henry V to Richard III to Hamlet. Yet, that hasn't stopped the 41-year-old thespian from dabbling in a modern classic, forgoing angst -- and dignity -- for a chance to portray J.K. Rowling's foppish foil, Gilderoy Lockhart, the Hogwarts School's defense against the dark arts teacher in "Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets." Were you familiar with the series before you signed on to play Lockhart?
ENTERTAINMENT
June 3, 1995 | DAVID GRITTEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
You're an accomplished actor-director and you have a good track record of critical and popular hits with small- and medium-scale films. Then you tackle a big-budget studio picture in which you star and direct. But reviewers and audiences alike are less than impressed; it's perceived as a bomb. What do you do? Do you hole up in L.A., chew your nails, wait for the phone to ring and pray the studios will overlook your "lapse" and not declare your career dead?
ENTERTAINMENT
October 15, 2013 | By David Ng
Rufus Norris, who began his career as an actor before turning to directing, has been tapped to succeed Nicholas Hytner as the new director of Britain's presitigious National Theatre. Norris is expected to assume his new role when Hytner steps down at the end of March 2015. The National Theatre has grown in international prominence in recent years with its digital broadcasts to cinemas around the world. The London company's NT Live series has broadcast such high-profile productions as "Frankenstein," with Benedict Cumberbatch and Jonny Lee Miller; "Macbeth" with Kenneth Branagh; and "The Audience," with Helen Mirren as Queen Elizabeth II. CHEATSHEET: Fall arts preview 2013 Norris will be the National Theatre' sixth artistic director.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 2013 | By John Horn
"What the hell is going on here?" Jack Ryan (Chris Pine) asks in the new trailer for the latest Tom Clancy-inspired movie, "Jack Ryan: Shadow One," which opens Christmas Day. Judging from the preview, director Kenneth Branagh ("Thor") and screenwriters Adam Cozad and David Koepp really like the Jason Bourne movies, as "Jack Ryan" appears to have as much in common with Robert Ludlum as it does with Clancy, who died this week at age 66. PHOTOS: Tom Clancy: 1947-2013 Like Bourne, the CIA operative Ryan is haunted by flashbacks and appears not to fully grasp what's happening around him. But he slowly starts to figure out that an international terror plot is about to strike at some of the world's biggest cities, including Tokyo and London.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 10, 2013 | By David Ng
Kenneth Branagh is back in Bard territory with a new production of Shakespeare's "Macbeth" that he stars in and co-directed with Rob Ashford at the Manchester International Festival in England. The production marks the first time Branagh has played the Scottish thane and is the actor's first Shakespearean stage role since he played "Richard III" in 2002. "Macbeth" is being performed in a deconsecrated church in the Manchester area. (Branagh-philes will recall that his 1995 comedy "A Midwinter's Tale" featured a production of "Hamlet"  set in an old English church .)
ENTERTAINMENT
June 10, 2013 | By Susan King
With Joss Whedon's contemporary take on Shakespeare's romantic comedy "Much Ado About Nothing" winning the hearts of most critics and earning a tidy $183,000 in just five theaters in its opening weekend, it's the perfect time to brush up on your Shakespeare movies. Here's a no-holds-Bard look, to speak, at some fun facts at previous cinematic adaptations of Shakespeare: The fact that no one could hear Shakespeare's beautiful prose didn't stop filmmakers during the silent era from adaptations of the Bard.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 10, 2013 | By Deborah Vankin
After a trip to Amsterdam in the summer of 2008, Los Angeles Times music critic Mark Swed brought back a curious souvenir: a three-disc Dutch edition of Kenneth Branagh's "The Magic Flute,” which he'd spotted in a remote record-store window. Upon returning home, he watched the 2006 film adaptation of Mozart's opera and was so moved that he wrote: “I am at a loss to understand why this film has been marginalized. 'Flute' is a joy.” The Branagh film, updating the opera from 1791 to World War I, premiered at the Toronto and Venice International Film Festivals and had limited overseas runs; but it has never showed in the U.S. -- until now. PHOTOS: Hollywood stars on stage On June 9, the Branagh-directed “Flute” is scheduled to screen at about 150 Emerging Pictures theaters across the country.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 18, 2012 | By David Ng
That's "Sir" Kenneth Branagh and "Dame" Zaha Hadid, to you. The birthday honors for Britain's Queen Elizabeth II were announced recently, and among those receiving titles will be actor-director Branagh, a Shakespearean veteran of stage and screen, and architect Hadid, who has won the Pritzker Prize and whose buildings include the London Olympics' Aquatic Centre. Branagh will receive a knighthood for his contributions to drama as well as to the community of his native Northern Ireland.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 14, 1990 | T. H. McCULLOH
Kenneth Branagh seems to have brought all his luck on himself. By age 28 he had adapted, directed and starred in the critically acclaimed new film version of Shakespeare's "Henry V" and negotiated the first American appearance of his Renaissance Theatre Company in their new productions of "King Lear" and "A Midsummer Night's Dream," opening next Sunday at the Mark Taper Forum.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 11, 2000 | SCARLET CHENG, Scarlet Cheng is a regular contributor to Calendar
If Shakespeare were alive, he might well boast Michael Ovitz as his manager, a three-picture first-look deal with Miramax, or his own production company on the lot of a major motion picture studio. From a pumped-up "Romeo + Juliet" to a fascist-era take on "Richard III," new visions of the Bard keep appearing on screen. The two latest film adaptations of his plays are currently in theaters.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 23, 2011 | BETSY SHARKEY
"My Week With Marilyn," starring Michelle Williams as the blond bombshell, is as mercurial a film as its subject, Marilyn Monroe, was a star. It's lush and vibrant when Williams is onscreen, mostly fussy British discontent when she's not. Whatever the flaws, the truth is nothing else much matters since Williams is Marilyn, and Marilyn had a way of outshining everything around her. It is magnetic to watch the actress move seamlessly between the...
NEWS
November 17, 2011 | By Amy Dawes, Special to the Los Angeles Times
"My Week With Marilyn," from director Simon Curtis, is a memoir of the unlikely relationship between the vulnerable screen legend (played by Michelle Williams) and a smitten young assistant, Colin Clark (Eddie Redmayne), on the London set of the 1956 movie "The Prince and the Showgirl. " Kenneth Branagh plays British acting great Laurence Olivier, who directed the picture and starred opposite Monroe. The old master and the insecure young actress prove to be a combustible match-up; Olivier is ready to kill her from the first day. To play the great Shakespearean is a daunting assignment, but Branagh, who like Olivier has directed and starred in many film versions of the Bard's works, is particularly well-matched.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|