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Kentucky Education

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NEWS
July 19, 1992 | ERIC HARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two years ago, when Kentucky launched the broadest, most ambitious school reform plan ever attempted in the United States, no one was prouder than Roger Noe. The state representative from a mountain district in eastern Kentucky had spent years in office fighting for improved education and had been a chief architect of reform. The plan he helped hammer out was hailed nationally for its comprehensiveness and scope.
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NEWS
May 4, 2000 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton opened his nationwide "school reform" crusade Wednesday, lavishing attention on an elementary school here that--with federal funds and state initiative--has made a dramatic academic comeback. Once plagued by what one top Clinton advisor called "miserable student performance," Audubon Elementary School has turned itself around as a result of an array of programs proposed by Gov. Paul E. Patton for low-performing schools.
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NEWS
May 4, 2000 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton opened his nationwide "school reform" crusade Wednesday, lavishing attention on an elementary school here that--with federal funds and state initiative--has made a dramatic academic comeback. Once plagued by what one top Clinton advisor called "miserable student performance," Audubon Elementary School has turned itself around as a result of an array of programs proposed by Gov. Paul E. Patton for low-performing schools.
NEWS
August 30, 1998 | CHARLES WOLFE, ASSOCIATED PRESS
All children in Daviess County's elementary schools got piano lessons this year. The idea was to build up brains, not strictly to make music. For the same reason, students began learning to play chess and were regularly exposed to the visual and performing arts. Kindergarten children were taught their ABCs in Spanish as well as English. Everything was calculated to increase neuron connections--literally, pathways in the brain--for learning and remembering.
NEWS
April 14, 1994 | RUDY ABRAMSON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It started eight years ago with a personal crisis: a newly divorced woman desperately needed a fresh start. She had no money. She had no marketable skill. She had no confidence. And she had very little hope. What she did have was a friend in Gurney Norman, a writer and English professor at the University of Kentucky. In the spring of 1986, Norman related the woman's plight to Jane Stephenson at Berea College.
NEWS
August 30, 1998 | CHARLES WOLFE, ASSOCIATED PRESS
All children in Daviess County's elementary schools got piano lessons this year. The idea was to build up brains, not strictly to make music. For the same reason, students began learning to play chess and were regularly exposed to the visual and performing arts. Kindergarten children were taught their ABCs in Spanish as well as English. Everything was calculated to increase neuron connections--literally, pathways in the brain--for learning and remembering.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 6, 2002 | From Associated Press
Former Kentucky Gov. Wallace Wilkinson, a self-made millionaire who helped create the state's lottery and overhauled its public schools, died Friday. He was 60. Wilkinson, a Democrat who was governor from 1987 to 1991, had been battling a recurrence of lymphatic cancer first diagnosed during his term of office. He died at St. Joseph Hospital in Lexington a day after suffering a stroke, said his attorney, Robert Brown.
NATIONAL
March 1, 2008 | Richard Fausset, Times Staff Writer
Arthur Hancock, a fourth-generation thoroughbred breeder, pointed out his office window on a recent morning to illustrate a fundamental difference between horse racing and casino gambling. A shimmering copper sun was rising over his 1,800-acre bluegrass farm. A clutch of lithe prize ponies grazed under a gunmetal sky. "Look out there," said Hancock, 64. "This is a whole different world." Las Vegas it was not. But Vegas-style gambling is threatening to intrude on Kentucky's genteel horse culture.
NEWS
June 9, 1989 | From Associated Press
The state Supreme Court declared Kentucky's system of public schooling unconstitutional Thursday and ordered the Legislature to create a new system. By permitting a wide gap between poor and wealthier school districts, the Legislature failed to meet its constitutional duty, the court ruled. "Lest there be any doubt, the result of our decision is that Kentucky's entire system of common schools is unconstitutional," Chief Justice Robert Stephens wrote for the court's five-member majority.
SPORTS
March 1, 2005 | Bill Christine, Times Staff Writer
The worst-case Kentucky Derby scenario for Kentucky breeders came true when Funny Cide, a New York-bred gelding, won the race in 2003. But if that wasn't deflating enough, along came Smarty Jones last year. He wasn't a gelding, but he was a Pennsylvania-bred. Two years, and neither Derby won by a Kentucky-bred.
NEWS
April 14, 1994 | RUDY ABRAMSON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It started eight years ago with a personal crisis: a newly divorced woman desperately needed a fresh start. She had no money. She had no marketable skill. She had no confidence. And she had very little hope. What she did have was a friend in Gurney Norman, a writer and English professor at the University of Kentucky. In the spring of 1986, Norman related the woman's plight to Jane Stephenson at Berea College.
NEWS
July 19, 1992 | ERIC HARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two years ago, when Kentucky launched the broadest, most ambitious school reform plan ever attempted in the United States, no one was prouder than Roger Noe. The state representative from a mountain district in eastern Kentucky had spent years in office fighting for improved education and had been a chief architect of reform. The plan he helped hammer out was hailed nationally for its comprehensiveness and scope.
BUSINESS
October 1, 1997 | JOHN O'DELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The idea was pretty simple. Take the fiber-optic lighting used in beer signs and modify it to provide underwater illumination for swimming pools. The execution, though, was tough. What was supposed to be a three-month research-and-development effort turned into a 14-year marathon of 12-hour workdays, pork-and-bean dinners and overextended credit cards. In the end, the company that John Robbins first envisioned never did much in the pool market. Instead, his Lumenyte International Corp.
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