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Kettleman City Ca

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 8, 2009 | By Louis Sahagun
When environmental activists began a survey of birth defects in this small migrant farming town halfway between Los Angeles and San Francisco, the results were alarming. Approximately 20 babies were born here during the 14 months beginning in September 2007. Three of them died; each had been born with oral deformities known as clefts. Two others born with the defect during that period are undergoing medical treatment. The 1,500 primarily Spanish-speaking residents of this impoverished enclave just off Interstate 5 want to know what is causing these health problems.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 29, 2010 | By Louis Sahagun
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has launched an internal investigation into its permitting and oversight in a San Joaquin Valley farming community dominated by a hazardous-waste facility, agricultural pesticide spraying and truck exhaust that may be contributing to health problems including severe birth defects. EPA regional administrator Jared Blumenfeld said the internal investigation would run concurrently with a broader inquiry in which state and local agencies will examine health and environmental issues facing Kettleman City, a town of 1,500 mostly poor, Spanish-speaking farmworkers.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 29, 2010 | By Louis Sahagun
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has launched an internal investigation into its permitting and oversight in a San Joaquin Valley farming community dominated by a hazardous-waste facility, agricultural pesticide spraying and truck exhaust that may be contributing to health problems including severe birth defects. EPA regional administrator Jared Blumenfeld said the internal investigation would run concurrently with a broader inquiry in which state and local agencies will examine health and environmental issues facing Kettleman City, a town of 1,500 mostly poor, Spanish-speaking farmworkers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 29, 2010 | By Margot Roosevelt
Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger directed state public health and environmental officials Friday to visit Kettleman City to conduct "a thorough investigation" into the causes of birth defects in the San Joaquin Valley farming community. Schwarzenegger's intercession comes more than a year after activists petitioned state agencies to investigate whether a large toxic dump near the community might be causing cleft palates and other defects among the mostly low-income Latino residents. The dump, operated by Houston-based Waste Management, is the largest hazardous waste facility west of the Mississippi.
NEWS
February 24, 1991 | MILES CORWIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Marylou Mares and Joe Maya are unlikely political allies. Mares is a farm worker who spends up to 10 hours a day in the fields transplanting tomatoes and chopping lettuce. Maya is a grower, a prominent businessman and political leader in the southern San Joaquin Valley. They work together now because, despite their differences, both oppose a commercial toxic waste incinerator proposed for Kettleman City. The facility would be the first of its kind in California.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 27, 2010 | By Louis Sahagun
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency said Tuesday that it plans to investigate a cluster of facial birth defects and other health issues among migrant farm workers in the impoverished California enclave of Kettleman City as part of the Obama administration's pledge to shift the agency's attention toward issues of environmental justice. Residents suspect the facial deformities are linked to a nearby toxic waste dump. The dump is set to be expanded to accommodate waste from large population centers, including Los Angeles, and residents have filed a lawsuit against the Kings County Board of Supervisors challenging its approval of the expansion.
NEWS
January 1, 1992 | From a Times Staff Writer
In a ruling that could indefinitely delay construction of the state's largest commercial hazardous-waste incinerator, a Superior Court judge here overturned local approval of the project, citing its impact on air quality and agriculture. Chemical Waste Management Inc.'
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 29, 2010 | By Margot Roosevelt
Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger directed state public health and environmental officials Friday to visit Kettleman City to conduct "a thorough investigation" into the causes of birth defects in the San Joaquin Valley farming community. Schwarzenegger's intercession comes more than a year after activists petitioned state agencies to investigate whether a large toxic dump near the community might be causing cleft palates and other defects among the mostly low-income Latino residents. The dump, operated by Houston-based Waste Management, is the largest hazardous waste facility west of the Mississippi.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 27, 2010 | By Louis Sahagun
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency said Tuesday that it plans to investigate a cluster of facial birth defects and other health issues among migrant farm workers in the impoverished California enclave of Kettleman City as part of the Obama administration's pledge to shift the agency's attention toward issues of environmental justice. Residents suspect the facial deformities are linked to a nearby toxic waste dump. The dump is set to be expanded to accommodate waste from large population centers, including Los Angeles, and residents have filed a lawsuit against the Kings County Board of Supervisors challenging its approval of the expansion.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 8, 2009 | By Louis Sahagun
When environmental activists began a survey of birth defects in this small migrant farming town halfway between Los Angeles and San Francisco, the results were alarming. Approximately 20 babies were born here during the 14 months beginning in September 2007. Three of them died; each had been born with oral deformities known as clefts. Two others born with the defect during that period are undergoing medical treatment. The 1,500 primarily Spanish-speaking residents of this impoverished enclave just off Interstate 5 want to know what is causing these health problems.
NEWS
January 1, 1992 | From a Times Staff Writer
In a ruling that could indefinitely delay construction of the state's largest commercial hazardous-waste incinerator, a Superior Court judge here overturned local approval of the project, citing its impact on air quality and agriculture. Chemical Waste Management Inc.'
NEWS
February 24, 1991 | MILES CORWIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Marylou Mares and Joe Maya are unlikely political allies. Mares is a farm worker who spends up to 10 hours a day in the fields transplanting tomatoes and chopping lettuce. Maya is a grower, a prominent businessman and political leader in the southern San Joaquin Valley. They work together now because, despite their differences, both oppose a commercial toxic waste incinerator proposed for Kettleman City. The facility would be the first of its kind in California.
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