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Kevin Corcoran

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ENTERTAINMENT
February 7, 2000 | DONALD LIEBENSON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Kevin Corcoran compares acting to being a baseball player, versatile at different positions. This is an apt analogy for the former child star who in the 1950s and '60s was one of Walt Disney's most valuable players. The Mouseketeers were entertainers and role models, and Tommy Kirk and Kurt Russell were teen faves. But kids in the audience related more to Corcoran, who created a character who was part all-American boy and part hellion.
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NATIONAL
April 22, 2013 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske
BOSTONĀ  -- Celeste Corcoran, 47, of Lowell, Mass., lost both her legs in the marathon explosions. Her daughter Sydney, a 17-year-old high school senior, was also wounded, hit with shrapnel. The two were staying in the same room at Boston Medical Center on Sunday, tended by Celeste's husband, Kevin Corcoran, 48, a truck driver so stoic that he wouldn't admit he, too, had been injured in the bombing. Lacerations on his legs went unattended for two days as he helped his family.
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NATIONAL
April 22, 2013 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske
BOSTONĀ  -- Celeste Corcoran, 47, of Lowell, Mass., lost both her legs in the marathon explosions. Her daughter Sydney, a 17-year-old high school senior, was also wounded, hit with shrapnel. The two were staying in the same room at Boston Medical Center on Sunday, tended by Celeste's husband, Kevin Corcoran, 48, a truck driver so stoic that he wouldn't admit he, too, had been injured in the bombing. Lacerations on his legs went unattended for two days as he helped his family.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 7, 2000 | DONALD LIEBENSON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Kevin Corcoran compares acting to being a baseball player, versatile at different positions. This is an apt analogy for the former child star who in the 1950s and '60s was one of Walt Disney's most valuable players. The Mouseketeers were entertainers and role models, and Tommy Kirk and Kurt Russell were teen faves. But kids in the audience related more to Corcoran, who created a character who was part all-American boy and part hellion.
NEWS
February 25, 1996 | N.F. MENDOZA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Now here's a guarantee: Pizza Boy (Sunday, 4 p.m. Cartoon Network) must deliver his pizza in less than five minutes--to the Arctic Circle, no less. It's the week's "World Premiere Toon." For ages 2 and up. * National Geographic Explorer (Sunday 6 p.m. TBS) takes a look at Botswana's "Lions of Darkness," reports on the ancient craft of creating "Mr. Mummy" and visits the treacherous Ndoki forests in "Ndoki Adventure." Boyd Matsons hosts. For ages 6 and up.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 10, 1994 | DOUGLAS ALGER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
While the bright blue and white Metrolink trains blossomed with thousands of new passengers in the wake of the highway-buckling Northridge earthquake, an older commuter transit service connecting Santa Clarita and Los Angeles went dormant--to the frustration of its loyal riders. Prior to the Jan. 17 quake, Santa Clarita operated a commuter bus service into Los Angeles.
NATIONAL
January 29, 2014 | By Alana Semuels
BAYONNE, N.J. -- At first he thought it was the fish. Maurice Weizmann, a Montreal businessman on a Royal Caribbean cruise with his wife, started vomiting on the second night of the 10-day voyage after eating dinner and watching a show on the ship Explorer of the Seas. His wife did too. Soon they learned the reality: They were only two of hundreds of passengers sickened by a yet-unidentified gastrointestinal illness that shortened their cruise by two days and created a floating sick bay on the high seas.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 17, 2012 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
"Copper," which premieres Sunday night, is the first original drama from BBC America, a network that sometimes seems to be made entirely of "Top Gear" reruns. It is rather good. Co-created by Tom Fontana and executive produced by Barry Levinson, who earlier laid "Homicide: Life on the Street" and "Oz" at our feet, with co-creator Will Rokos (who co-wrote "Monster's Ball"), it is a sort of Eastern western, set around the unruly, pestilent Five Points area of New York City in 1864 - the place and the time, or just after it, of Martin Scorsese's "Gangs of New York.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 2006 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
"Family" films are not strictly for the kids. A lot of adults love to watch old Disney films from their youth and rush to theaters, with kids or not, to see the newest animated film or the latest "Harry Potter" saga. Extras on some DVDs coming out today reflect their dual appeal for kids and adults.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 6, 1998 | JOAN FANTAZIA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nick Nolte can afford to be picky about his roles. He can take chances with parts in "Mother Night" "Jefferson in Paris" and "Afterglow." He had become famous in 1976 with the hugely successful TV miniseries "Rich Man, Poor Man" (Nolte was the poor man, Peter Strauss the rich one). That won him an Emmy nomination--one of 23 for the miniseries--and a ticket to bigger things: eventually "North Dallas Forty," "48HRS." and "The Prince of Tides," which earned him an Oscar nomination.
NEWS
October 2, 1994 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Disney Drive-In," the Disney Channel's new Saturday afternoon showcase, is supposed to be for the kids. But don't tell that to baby boomers. For anyone who grew up in the '50s and '60s, "Disney Drive-In" is a trip down memory lane and a chance to visit such old friends as Spin, Marty, Moochie, Annette and the Hardy Boys. Beginning this week, the Disney Channel will offer old-fashioned movie matinee entertainment.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 28, 2011 | By Mitchell Landsberg, Los Angeles Times
Cardinal Roger Mahony walked slowly across the sanctuary of the Cathedral of Our Lady of the Angels, leaning softly on his shepherd's staff as he completed one of his last public acts as archbishop of Los Angeles. Passing the altar on one side and his assembled bishops on the other, he finally reached the man who was taking over his position as head of the nation's largest Roman Catholic archdiocese. Mahony handed the crooked staff, known as a crosier, to Archbishop Jose Gomez, symbolizing one of the most ancient traditions of the church, the transfer of authority from one bishop to another.
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