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Kevin Mccarthy

REAL ESTATE
July 19, 1987
Warren H. Neville, owner of Neville Associates, Riverside, has been installed as the new president of Inland Southern California Chapter 79 of the Society of Real Estate Appraisers. John C. Couturier, owner of Inland Area Appraisal Service, Riverside, is the first vice president, and Kenny G. Adams owner of Kenny G. Adams & Associates, Chino, is second vice president. Kevin McCarthy, chief appraiser at Pomona First Federal Savings & Loan is the secretary, and Robert L.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 14, 2014 | By Diana Marcum and Evan Halper
FIREBAUGH, Calif. - Standing Friday afternoon on cracked, parched earth where melons would usually grow, President Obama brought both a message of aid and an ominous warning to drought-stricken California as he outlined more than $160 million in federal assistance. The directives include aid for ranchers struggling to feed their livestock because of the drought, and for food banks serving families in hard-hit areas. Obama also called on U.S. government facilities in California to curb water use. "These actions will help.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 8, 2009 | Richard Winton and Joel Rubin
Officers throughout the Los Angeles Police Department grieved Tuesday as news spread that a veteran detective had killed herself in the lobby of an L.A. County Sheriff's Department station Monday night. Susan J. Clemmer, a well-regarded officer assigned to the LAPD's Gang and Narcotics Division, walked into the Santa Clarita sheriff's station about 9:15 p.m. and spoke to the sheriff's deputy at the front desk, according to sheriff's spokesman Steve Whitmore and LAPD officials.
BUSINESS
February 9, 2014 | Michael Hiltzik
There are two possible policy outcomes to a severe drought like the one California is experiencing now. One is that the drought focuses the minds of political leaders and water users, prompting them to come together to craft a broad, comprehensive solution to a problem that won't be going away. The other is that the community of water users will fragment and turn on one another, with farmers lining up against environmentalists, suburbanites against farmers, and so on. Which way would you guess things are going?
OPINION
February 3, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
As California's drought continues, and more than a dozen rural communities ponder what to do when their drinking water runs out sometime in March, it would be nice if the state's Republican politicians brought some straightforward plans for relief to the table. But what many of them are bringing instead is a tired political tactic barely, and laughably, disguised as a remedy for the lack of rainfall. The "man-made California drought" is the term House Republicans use to describe the state's current dry condition, as if it were somehow the hand of humankind, environmentalists or, even worse, Democrats that has stopped the snowfall over the Sierra and kept the dams that store water for fields, orchards and homes from being replenished.
NEWS
November 14, 2013 | By Sandra Hernandez
House Speaker John A. Boehner this week effectively declared immigration reform dead, at least for this year. “I'll make clear we have no intention ever of going to conference on the Senate bill,” the Ohio Republican said Wednesday, referring to to a bipartisan comprehensive immigration bill that cleared the Senate earlier this year. Of course, it didn't take long after Boehner made it official for the blame game to begin. What killed immigration reform? Was is the botched rollout of the Affordable Care Act?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 22, 2003 | Richard Fausset, Times Staff Writer
Friends and relatives of the husband-and-wife filmmaking team killed in last week's crash at the Santa Monica Farmers' Market gathered Monday to remember the couple with laughter and tears, screening a few of the quirky, funny movies they left behind.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 1990 | Don Shirley
A San Diego branch of A. R. Gurney's "Love Letters" will open Oct. 22 in the Old Globe Theatre. It will follow the pattern established elsewhere: rotating casts that change weekly, using well-recognized stars. First up are Elizabeth Montgomery and Robert Foxworth, Oct. 22-28, to be followed by Beth Howland and Charles Kimbrough (Oct. 30-Nov. 4) and Sada Thompson and Kevin McCarthy (Nov. 6-11). The run may extend into January. Old Globe subscribers may buy discounted tickets to "Love Letters."
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