Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsKevin Mitnick
IN THE NEWS

Kevin Mitnick

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
February 18, 1995 | ANN W. O'NEILL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Kevin Mitnick has been called a cybercrook, a computer addict, a digital desperado--even an electronic terrorist. But he never graduated from college and his mother once told a newspaper reporter she didn't think he was very bright. So begins the endless loop of contradictions making it nearly impossible to separate Mitnick, the 31-year-old hacker who was captured Wednesday after two years as a fugitive, from his myth.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
November 19, 2003 | Joseph Menn, Times Staff Writer
It wasn't Mary Ann Davidson's worst nightmare, but it was close. A fax from a hacker in the Middle East landed on her desk at Oracle Corp., proclaiming the discovery of a hole in the company's database software through which he could steal crucial information from such customers as Boeing Co., Ford Motor Co. and the CIA. The fax warned Davidson, the company's chief security officer, to contact the hacker immediately -- or else.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 27, 1996 | JULIE TAMAKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal grand jury indicted infamous computer hacker Kevin Mitnick on Thursday, accusing him of stealing millions of dollars in software in an elaborate hacking spree during the more than two years that he was a fugitive before his capture last year in North Carolina. The 25-count indictment alleges that the 33-year-old computer wizard broke into the systems of major software companies, then transferred stolen material to computers at USC via the Internet.
BUSINESS
February 11, 2003 | Alex Pham, Times Staff Writer
The king of computer hackers got a taste of his own meddling this weekend. Kevin Mitnick, who served five years in federal prison for infiltrating the computer networks of Sun Microsystems Inc., Motorola Inc., Nokia and other large corporations, learned the same painful lesson as his former victims: No computer is ever safe. To make matters worse, the Web site that sustained the attack was designed to advertise Mitnick's new computer security business, Defensive Thinking Inc.
BUSINESS
December 27, 2002 | David Ho, Associated Press
A man the federal government once labeled "the most wanted computer criminal in U.S. history" can soon resume surfing the Internet and using electronic devices he was forced to give up after his conviction. Kevin Mitnick, 39, of Thousand Oaks served five years in federal prison for stealing software and altering data at Motorola Inc., Novell Inc., Nokia Corp., Sun Microsystems Inc. and USC. Prosecutors accused him of causing tens of millions of dollars in damage to corporate computer networks.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 1, 1996 | FRANK B. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Convicted computer hacker Kevin Mitnick and a man investigators say was his accomplice in a computer crime scheme were arraigned Monday on 25 counts of computer fraud and other charges stemming from a two-year "hacking spree." Mitnick and his longtime friend, Lewis DePayne, both pleaded not guilty in U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 29, 1995 | JOHN JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Computer hacker Kevin Mitnick made his first appearance Monday in federal court in Los Angeles, as both the government and Mitnick's attorneys continued working privately to settle the case against him without a trial. Mitnick, 32, whose dramatic capture in North Carolina in March ended a sophisticated electronic manhunt for the fugitive hacker, appeared in a conservative blue suit and tie for arraignment on a 1989 probation violation. But U.S. Dist.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 26, 1995 | JOHN JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If a man is defined by the quality of his enemies, Kevin Mitnick's reputation as a super-hacker was confirmed by his arrest last week, following a nationwide electronic manhunt mounted by a sophisticated team of FBI agents and private-industry investigators.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 3, 1995 | JOHN JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Resolution of a North Carolina case against famed computer hacker Kevin Mitnick clears the way for him to be brought back to California, where he will face substantially more serious charges, federal authorities said. Mitnick, the former North Hills man who was the nation's most-wanted cyber crook before his capture in February, agreed to plead guilty Friday to one count of cellular phone fraud in Raleigh, N.C.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 28, 1996 | JON D. MARKMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Bay Area executive indicted on charges of helping notorious hacker Kevin Mitnick in a computer crime spree surrendered in U.S. District Court in Los Angeles on Friday and was released on $100,000 bond. Lewis DePayne, a former Burbank and Pasadena resident, was described by his attorney as an "innocent, tax-paying" man who was accused only because of his longtime friendship with Mitnick. DePayne, a computer systems manager for a large Newark, Calif.
BUSINESS
January 20, 2003 | From Reuters
One of the world's most famous computer hackers gets off probation this week and plans to dive back into the Internet, his former playground where breaking-and-entering landed him in jail for five years. On Tuesday, 39-year-old Kevin Mitnick will log on to the Internet for the first time in eight years, during the live TechTV show "Screen Savers." Also scheduled to be on the program are Shawn Fanning, creator of Napster Inc., and Steve Wozniak, a co-founder of Apple Computer Inc.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 4, 2003 | Jenifer Ragland, Times Staff Writer
As a young man, Kevin Mitnick made a name for himself by deceiving people. Now, at 39, the nation's most notorious computer hacker is taking on a very different challenge: convincing the world that he can be trusted. On Jan. 20, Mitnick will gain unsupervised access to computers and the Internet for the first time in eight years after serving a five-year prison sentence and three years of strict probation.
BUSINESS
December 27, 2002 | David Ho, Associated Press
A man the federal government once labeled "the most wanted computer criminal in U.S. history" can soon resume surfing the Internet and using electronic devices he was forced to give up after his conviction. Kevin Mitnick, 39, of Thousand Oaks served five years in federal prison for stealing software and altering data at Motorola Inc., Novell Inc., Nokia Corp., Sun Microsystems Inc. and USC. Prosecutors accused him of causing tens of millions of dollars in damage to corporate computer networks.
BUSINESS
July 1, 2002 | Associated Press
Barred by the terms of his probation from messing with computers, ex-convict hacker Kevin Mitnick has turned to writing about them, baring the tricks of his former trade in a forthcoming book. An advance copy of the book, "The Art of Deception," describes more than a dozen scenarios in which computer network administrators are duped into divulging passwords, encryption keys and other coveted security details. But it's all fiction. Or so said Mitnick.
BUSINESS
July 13, 2000 | From Associated Press
A notorious computer hacker who led the FBI on a three-year manhunt while allegedly causing millions of dollars in damage to technology companies now has federal permission to pursue work as a computer consultant or online writer. It's a "180-degree change" in the restrictions previously enforced by Kevin Mitnick's probation officer, Mitnick attorney Donald Randolph said Wednesday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 2000 | DAVID ROSENZWEIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal judge refused to intervene Monday in a dispute between convicted computer hacker Kevin Mitnick and his probation officer over a job offer from an Internet-based business. U.S. District Judge Mariana R. Pfaelzer told Mitnick he should sit down with his probation officer and try to resolve any disagreement before asking her to intercede. "This defendant shall not be treated differently than anyone else," she said.
NEWS
February 16, 1995 | JOHN JOHNSON and RONALD J. OSTROW and JOSH MEYER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Kevin Mitnick, the nation's most wanted computer hacker, who had evaded authorities in narrow escapes in Los Angeles and Seattle over the last two years, was captured Wednesday morning at his apartment in Raleigh, N.C. Although authorities were unable to say exactly how much damage he wreaked during his years on the run, the cellular telecommunications industry alleges that Mitnick, who used cellular phones to illegally access computers, may have cost it millions of dollars.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 10, 1994 | JOHN JOHNSON and JULIE TAMAKI, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
He's one of America's most wanted digital desperadoes. Kevin Mitnick, a legendary "dark side" hacker whose computer was, in the words of one investigator, an "umbilical cord . . . to his soul," is being sought by federal and state authorities for once again allegedly using his technical wizardry as a weapon. A warrant has been issued accusing him of violating the terms of his federal probation that he not enter a computer illegally.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 23, 2000 | DAVID ROSENZWEIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former hacker Kevin Mitnick, who spent four years behind bars for stealing computer secrets from some of America's top companies, is returning to court next week to challenge a probation officer's ruling barring him from becoming a columnist for a Web-based business. Mitnick, freed earlier this year from federal custody, has been offered a job writing a monthly column for Contentville, the brainchild of magazine publisher and media critic Steven Brill.
BUSINESS
January 21, 2000 | GREG MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Convicted computer hacker Kevin Mitnick is scheduled to be released from prison today after spending nearly five years in incarceration for stealing software from such companies as Sun Microsystems Inc. and Motorola Inc. Mitnick's release caps the legal odyssey of a Southern California native who became one of the most notorious hackers in history after leading the FBI on a two-year, cross-country chase during the early 1990s.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|