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OPINION
February 14, 2014
Re "Obama's pipeline dilemma," Opinion, Feb. 12 Doyle McManus aptly points out several of the political pros and cons related to President Obama's decision on the Keystone XL pipeline. What he fails to address is the need for fossil fuels to be left underground and for us to convert to renewables. McManus suggests procrastination by Obama might be a virtue. The destruction of Canada's boreal forest and the continued release of carbon into the atmosphere don't qualify. Far more virtuous would be for Obama to follow through on his 2013 inauguration promise: "We will respond to the threat of climate change, knowing that the failure to do so would betray our children and future generations....
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NATIONAL
April 18, 2014 | By Neela Banerjee and Lisa Mascaro
WASHINGTON - The Obama administration on Friday delayed a decision on the construction of the controversial Keystone XL pipeline, citing a Nebraska state court decision that invalidated part of the project's route. The latest hold-up in the unusually lengthy review of the $5.3-billion oil pipeline almost certainly will push any decision until after the November midterm election, getting President Obama off a political hook. The White House has been pressed on one side by environmentalists who have turned opposition to the pipeline into a touchstone issue and on the other by conservative Democrats from energy-producing states who say approving Keystone XL would show the administration's commitment to job creation.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 19, 2012 | By Dean Kuipers
The Times' Politics Now blog reports that the Obama administration has rejected a permit for the controversial Keystone XL pipeline project. The decision was due by Feb. 21, under provisions voted in by Congress as part of the payroll tax cut extension in December, but the president and his appointees are expected to announce a decision as early as Wednesday. This does not mean, however, that the project is dead. The pipeline's parent company TransCanada will need to propose an alternative route to avoid putting the pipe over a large aquifer in Nebraska, and then it can resubmit its permits.
NEWS
April 10, 2014 | By Neela Banerjee
WASHINGTON - A group of Democratic senators, including several facing tough re-election races, sent a letter Thursday to President Obama demanding approval of the Keystone XL oil pipeline by May 31. The letter's forcefulness hints at the growing anxiety among many Democrats that they could lose control of the Senate in November. A decision by the end of May to approve the controversial $5.3-billion project would give embattled Democratic candidates in more conservative states a timely accomplishment to tout to skeptical constituents.
OPINION
February 8, 2014
Re "Free the pipeline, Obama," Opinion, Feb. 4 Those who oppose Keystone XL aren't doing so primarily to make the pipeline a "litmus test issue for climate seriousness," as Jonah Goldberg writes. Rather, they're taking a principled stand. We must stop the juggernaut of business-as-usual that is leading inexorably to climate disruption. Environmentalists recognize that our civilization depends on vast amounts of energy and we cannot stop using fossil fuels overnight. But with more frequent extreme weather showing up right on schedule and rising sea levels, we absolutely must replace fossil fuels with sustainable energy as soon as possible.
NEWS
January 18, 2012 | By James Oliphant and Seema Mehta, This post has been corrected, as indicated below
As expected, Republicans are seizing upon the Obama administration's reported decision to delay the permitting process for the Keystone XL pipeline project, contending that President Obama is missing an opportunity to boost the economy. The State Department is expected to announce that it cannot grant a permit to the project within the 60-day window mandated in legislation passed by Congress. It doesn't mean, however, that the project won't go forward at some point. “President Obama's decision to reject the Keystone XL crude oil pipeline is as shocking as it is revealing,” Mitt Romney, the frontrunner for the GOP nomination, said in a statement.
NATIONAL
August 16, 2012 | By Kim Murphy
The Canadian pipeline company TransCanada has quietly begun construction of the southern leg of the controversial Keystone XL pipeline, installing segments near Livingston, Texas, company officials confirmed Thursday. “Construction started on Aug. 9. So we've now started construction in Texas,” TransCanada spokesman Shawn Howard told the Los Angeles Times. The southern section of the pipeline received government approval in July. The first in a series of protests also was launched Thursday as opponents of the pipeline, designed to eventually carry diluted bitumen from the tar sands of northern Canada to refineries on the Texas Gulf Coast, unfurled protest banners at two equipment staging yards in Texas and Oklahoma.
NEWS
April 22, 2013 | By Neela Banerjee
WASHINGTON -- The Environmental Protection Agency issued a sharply critical assessment of the State Department's recent environmental impact review of the controversial Keystone XL pipeline, certain to complicate efforts to win approval for the $7-billion project. In a letter to top State Department officials overseeing the permit process for the pipeline, the EPA lays out detailed objections regarding greenhouse gas emissions related to the project, pipeline safety and alternative routes.
NATIONAL
April 19, 2012 | By Kim Murphy
TransCanada has revealed the route it would like to use to build the Keystone XL oil pipeline through Nebraska, where the $7-billion project has become mired in concerns over the nation's most important agricultural aquifer. A new report submitted by the Canadian pipeline company to the Nebraska Department of Environmental Quality shows an alternative route for the pipeline, designed to carry diluted bitumen from the tar sands of Alberta province to U.S. refineries.
NEWS
February 7, 2012 | By Lisa Mascaro
Republicans continued efforts to advance the Keystone XL oil pipeline, hoping to bypass President Obama's decision to shelve the project and drive a political wedge between Democrats on the issue. The GOP-led House's Energy and Commerce Committee approved legislation on Tuesday that would remove the project's approval from the administration's jurisdiction and require the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission to decide whether to approve the project within 30 days. “We've got to move the Keystone XL pipeline forward, despite the president's effort to kill it - and this bill does just that,” said Rep. Lee Terry (R-Neb.)
NEWS
March 19, 2014 | By Neela Banerjee
WASHINGTON -- Nearly half of Democrats favor granting a permit for the construction of the controversial Keystone XL pipeline, according to a poll released Wednesday by the Pew Research Center for the People & the Press. The $5.3-billion pipeline, which would ship oil from Hardisty, Canada, to Steele City, Neb., has undergone five years of reviews to get a presidential permit needed for infrastructure projects that cross a United States border. Environmentalists and some major Democratic donors and activists have opposed the pipeline, contending it would worsen greenhouse gas emissions that drive climate change.
NATIONAL
February 26, 2014 | By Neela Banerjee
The State Department did not violate conflict-of-interest rules when it chose an outside contractor to conduct an environmental impact study of the proposed Keystone XL pipeline, the department's inspector general concluded in a report issued Wednesday. The conclusion came as a blow to environmental groups seeking to stop the pipeline's construction. They had urged an investigation of recent business ties between TransCanada, which plans to build it, and Environmental Resources Management, which conducted the environmental assessment.
NATIONAL
February 19, 2014 | By Ralph Vartabedian and Neela Banerjee
A Nebraska court ruling Wednesday left the long-troubled Keystone XL pipeline with no approved route through the state, dealing the project a legal setback that could delay it at least a year. Lancaster County District Judge Stephanie F. Stacy struck down a 2012 law that gave Republican Gov. Dave Heineman authority to approve the pipeline's route, bypassing the state's Public Service Commission. Her decision came in a lawsuit filed by three property owners whose land was in the pipeline's path.
OPINION
February 14, 2014
Re "Child star, diplomat," Obituary, Feb. 12 Shirley Temple Black, who died Monday, had a wonderful sense of humor. When she ran for Congress in a special election in 1967, she had her headquarters on Ventura Boulevard in Sherman Oaks, with a sign in the window that said, "Vote for me or I will hold my breathe until I turn blue. " I remember laughing out loud when I saw that sign. Robert Berliner Sherman Oaks ALSO: Letters: No executions -- for now Letters: Mammograms, yes or no?
OPINION
February 14, 2014
Re "Obama's pipeline dilemma," Opinion, Feb. 12 Doyle McManus aptly points out several of the political pros and cons related to President Obama's decision on the Keystone XL pipeline. What he fails to address is the need for fossil fuels to be left underground and for us to convert to renewables. McManus suggests procrastination by Obama might be a virtue. The destruction of Canada's boreal forest and the continued release of carbon into the atmosphere don't qualify. Far more virtuous would be for Obama to follow through on his 2013 inauguration promise: "We will respond to the threat of climate change, knowing that the failure to do so would betray our children and future generations....
OPINION
February 12, 2014 | Doyle McManus
The debate over the Keystone XL pipeline may look like just another example of the partisan divide on Capitol Hill. If only it were that easy. President Obama's dilemma over whether to approve the 1,600-mile pipeline, which would move oil from Canada to Texas, has more to do with disagreements within the Democratic Party, and with foreign relations. Environmentalists, including some of the Democrats' biggest donors, have seized on Keystone as a test of Obama's commitment to halting global warming.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 17, 2012 | By Dean Kuipers
As the deadline looms for President Obama's Feb. 21 decision on whether to approve the Keystone XL Pipeline, the dogfight is focused on job numbers. Project proponents tout an enormous number of new jobs created by the pipeline, but a labor institute says those numbers are greatly inflated. New TV ads that began running Saturday, produced by the American Petroleum Institute, praise the pipeline as a source of desperately needed jobs, citing a figure produced by an industry-backed study that claims 20,000 jobs would be created.
OPINION
February 8, 2014
Re "Free the pipeline, Obama," Opinion, Feb. 4 Those who oppose Keystone XL aren't doing so primarily to make the pipeline a "litmus test issue for climate seriousness," as Jonah Goldberg writes. Rather, they're taking a principled stand. We must stop the juggernaut of business-as-usual that is leading inexorably to climate disruption. Environmentalists recognize that our civilization depends on vast amounts of energy and we cannot stop using fossil fuels overnight. But with more frequent extreme weather showing up right on schedule and rising sea levels, we absolutely must replace fossil fuels with sustainable energy as soon as possible.
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