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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 18, 1991
KGB: Kinder George Bush. ROBERT EDELSTEIN Visalia
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OPINION
March 18, 2014 | Jonah Goldberg
Will everyone please stop talking about a new Cold War? However badly things work out between Russia and the United States and the West, a new Cold War isn't in the cards because Russia today isn't the Soviet Union. Sure, we are in a diplomatic and geostrategic conflict with Russia, which was the heart of the old Soviet Union. Also, Russia wants much of the real estate that belonged to the Soviet Union before it collapsed. And Vladimir Putin is a former KGB colonel who now waxes nostalgic for the good old days.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2014 | By Alan Eyerly
The brutal slaying of a KGB spy couple and their teenage daughter sends a shockwave through the Soviet espionage network and alarms the public in Episode 2 (“Cardinal”) of “The Americans,” the Cold War drama on FX. Investigators have yet to discover the true identities of the dead parents, Emmett (Jeremy Davidson) and Leanne (Natalie Gold). For now they're regarded as typical Virginia residents tragically gunned down in their hotel room. Russian spies Elizabeth (Keri Russell)
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2014 | By Alan Eyerly
The brutal slaying of a KGB spy couple and their teenage daughter sends a shockwave through the Soviet espionage network and alarms the public in Episode 2 (“Cardinal”) of “The Americans,” the Cold War drama on FX. Investigators have yet to discover the true identities of the dead parents, Emmett (Jeremy Davidson) and Leanne (Natalie Gold). For now they're regarded as typical Virginia residents tragically gunned down in their hotel room. Russian spies Elizabeth (Keri Russell)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 29, 1987
Apropos the April 13 Metro article on LAPD undercover agents on high school campuses: The Soviets have successfully used young and attractive (and so very female) KGB undercover agents to corrupt young American Marines. Have they been taking lessons from the LAPD? The Soviets would argue that the ends are worth the means: The triumph of socialism is such an important social goal that it justifies the state in constructing false friendships to gain valuable information. Supporters of this outrageous LAPD program argue that a drug-free school environment is such an important social goal that it justifies the state in constructing false friendships to gain valuable information.
WORLD
July 12, 2009 | Kim Murphy
For the last 12 years, Mikhail and Irina Lennikov have lived unremarkable lives, not unlike countless other immigrants who came to Canada from Eastern Europe looking for a fresh start in a prosperous and quiet land. He found a job as a software developer. She got hired in an insurance office. Their son, Dmitri, who barely remembers Russia, graduated last month from Byrne Creek Secondary School in the comfortable suburb of Burnaby.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 9, 1991
So, now that the KGB is no longer in the domestic affairs business, I guess that leaves the IRS as the world's largest government entity to infiltrate, terrorize and otherwise harass its own citizens. ANDREW CARRILLO, Los Angeles
NEWS
March 31, 1989 | From Associated Press
Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev cut an expensive deal with the KGB to win the secret police agency's support in heading off a serious challenge to his political reform plans, a private Kremlinologist says in a study released Thursday in Santa Monica. The September, 1988, bargain placed KGB chief Viktor M.
NEWS
August 23, 1991 | Times researcher Michael Meyers
Since its inception in 1917, the Soviet secret police has played a key role in Soviet politics. Known over the years as Cheka, OGPU, NKVD, MGB and KGB, the agency is famous for its espionage abroad and its use of terror to suppress political dissidence at home .
NEWS
September 19, 1991 | Associated Press
Soviet Foreign Minister Boris D. Pankin promised Wednesday that he will reduce KGB staffs in embassies and investigate submarine intrusions into Swedish territory. The number of agents working abroad for the secret agency will be cut "to the lowest minimum required by our security interests," Pankin told a news conference. Swedish security police have estimated that a third of the diplomats at the Soviet Embassy in Stockholm have been linked to the KGB.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 26, 2013 | By Steven Zeitchik
NEW YORK - On a bone-rattlingly cold winter morning, Keri Russell and Matthew Rhys are sitting in a Lincoln sedan the size of a small barge, adjusting Walkman-era fashion accouterments and whispering about the Reagan assassination attempt. Russell and Rhys are not oddball nostalgists. The actors are shooting a scene for FX's "The Americans," a Cold War thriller set in the early 1980s that premieres Wednesday. Created by former CIA officer Joseph Weisberg, the show stars Elizabeth (Russell)
WORLD
January 22, 2012 | By Sergei L. Loiko, Los Angeles Times
Writer Vladimir Voinovich has spent decades skewering Russia's bureaucracy and power structure — and in some cases predicting the future with uncanny accuracy. Soviet officials punished him by stripping him of his citizenship in 1980 and expelling him. Six years later, writing from exile, he published the novel "Moscow 2042. " It described a shrunken, post-Soviet Russia run by a former KGB spy who had been stationed in Germany. That was years before Vladimir Putin, a former spy based in Germany, actually did rise to power.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 23, 2010 | By Glenn Whipp
With Russian spies making headlines, it's not a bad time to hop into the way-back machine and revisit a slice of Cold War espionage with the French import "Farewell." The fictionalized account of an extraordinary episode of espionage that helped cripple the Soviet Union, "Farewell" offers intrigue, simmering tension and Fred Ward doing a goofy impersonation of Ronald Reagan. OK, so that last part isn't so hot. But for the majority of its leisurely running time, Christian Caron's twisty thriller sports a smart sophistication along with an amazing story that's all the more remarkable for its relative anonymity in history books.
WORLD
July 16, 2010 | By Megan K. Stack, Los Angeles Times
Russia's most feared counterintelligence service took on even wider powers under a law approved Friday in parliament, and critics warned that the country was sliding back toward Soviet-era repressions. The FSB, a modern-day successor to the Soviet KGB, will now have the authority to issue warnings to people who have broken no laws but are viewed as potential criminals. Rights monitors have criticized the law as a throwback to the times when Russians lived in fear of state persecution for appearing ideologically objectionable.
WORLD
July 12, 2009 | Kim Murphy
For the last 12 years, Mikhail and Irina Lennikov have lived unremarkable lives, not unlike countless other immigrants who came to Canada from Eastern Europe looking for a fresh start in a prosperous and quiet land. He found a job as a software developer. She got hired in an insurance office. Their son, Dmitri, who barely remembers Russia, graduated last month from Byrne Creek Secondary School in the comfortable suburb of Burnaby.
WORLD
March 23, 2009 | Megan K. Stack
Who will be Russia's host to the Olympics: the KGB-officer-turned-oligarch, the outspoken liberal reformer or the international fugitive wanted on suspicion of murder? As Russia basks in the hard-won prestige of hosting the 2014 Winter Games, a symbolic battle for the country's soul has erupted over an improbable prize: the office of mayor of Sochi, the Black Sea city where the Games will be held.
NEWS
September 16, 1991 | Associated Press
Foreign Minister Boris D. Pankin said the KGB secret police will be barred from selecting personnel for diplomatic posts. In a weekend interview with the independent news agency Interfax, Pankin said the KGB "must not be engaged in forming the personnel" and that he wants to put a stop to the deployment of spies in diplomatic guise. That would put him on a collision course with the new KGB chief, Vadim V.
NEWS
December 3, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
Russia's Communist-dominated lower house of parliament, the Duma, voted in favor of restoring a monument to Felix E. Dzerzhinsky, founder of the feared Soviet secret police. Dzerzhinsky, known as "Iron Felix," founded the Bolshevik Cheka, which ruthlessly eliminated political opponents and established a tradition of repression that was to lead to the KGB and its network of labor camps in which millions died.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 1, 2008 | Walter Pincus, The Washington Post
Yuri Nosenko, a KGB agent whose defection to the United States in 1964 and subsequent three-year harsh detention and hostile interrogation by CIA officials remain immensely controversial, died Aug. 23 under an assumed name in a Southern state, according to intelligence officials. His death came after "a long illness." He was 81. Nosenko, a lieutenant colonel in the Soviet secret police and intelligence agency, interviewed Lee Harvey Oswald during his time in the Soviet Union from 1959 to 1962.
OPINION
December 2, 2007 | David Wise, David Wise is the author of "Nightmover: How Aldrich Ames Sold the CIA to the KGB for $4.6 Million" and "Spy: The Inside Story of How the FBI's Robert Hanssen Betrayed America."
When Vladimir A. Kryuchkov, the Kremlin's top spy for almost two decades, died in Moscow 10 days ago, little notice was taken in the U.S. media. That wasn't surprising because the Soviet apparatchik-turned-spymaster was hardly a household name. But in the CIA and the FBI, close attention was paid. It was Kryuchkov who, first as head of the KGB's First Chief Directorate and then as chief of the spy agency, presided over the worst damage ever done to U.S.
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