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Khaled Hosseini

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ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 2013 | By Wendy Smith, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Although Khaled Hosseini has lived in the United States since he was 15, he remains engaged in the struggles of his native Afghanistan, which he has made palpable for Western readers in two bestselling novels, "The Kite Runner" and "A Thousand Splendid Suns. " His beautifully written, masterfully crafted new book, "And the Mountains Echoed," spans nearly 60 years of Afghan history as it investigates the consequences of a desperate act that scars two young lives and resonates through many others.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 2013 | By Wendy Smith, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Although Khaled Hosseini has lived in the United States since he was 15, he remains engaged in the struggles of his native Afghanistan, which he has made palpable for Western readers in two bestselling novels, "The Kite Runner" and "A Thousand Splendid Suns. " His beautifully written, masterfully crafted new book, "And the Mountains Echoed," spans nearly 60 years of Afghan history as it investigates the consequences of a desperate act that scars two young lives and resonates through many others.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 13, 2007 | Josh Getlin, Times Staff Writer
For a painfully shy fiction writer who insists he has no political agenda, Khaled Hosseini learned the power of international celebrity -- and his own voice -- in a hurry. Just before he became a bestselling author, the San Jose-area doctor took a trip to his native Afghanistan in 2003. His first book, "The Kite Runner," had not yet appeared, and he had no clue it was about to become a publishing sensation.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 29, 2009
Conan returns: Conan O'Brien returned to "The Tonight Show" on Monday after missing Friday's episode because he hit his head during a stunt accident and went to the hospital to be checked out. A "Tonight Show" rerun aired instead of the planned episode. "Kite" grounded: Khaled Hosseini, author of "The Kite Runner," has canceled an appearance at UCLA Live on Wednesday night because of what a spokesman described as "a family emergency." For a ticket refund or exchange, contact the UCLA Central Ticket Office.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 16, 2008 | From Reuters
Afghanistan has banned the import and exhibition of "The Kite Runner," a film about the troubled friendship of two Afghan boys. The decision was made "because some of its scenes are questionable and unacceptable for some people . . . and would cause trouble for the government and people," a government official said. Paramount, the studio behind the adaptation of the 2003 bestselling novel by U.S.-based Afghan author Khaled Hosseini, last year had to get its three young stars out of their homeland before the movie premiered to protect them from a possible backlash.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 29, 2009
Conan returns: Conan O'Brien returned to "The Tonight Show" on Monday after missing Friday's episode because he hit his head during a stunt accident and went to the hospital to be checked out. A "Tonight Show" rerun aired instead of the planned episode. "Kite" grounded: Khaled Hosseini, author of "The Kite Runner," has canceled an appearance at UCLA Live on Wednesday night because of what a spokesman described as "a family emergency." For a ticket refund or exchange, contact the UCLA Central Ticket Office.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 8, 2003 | David L. Ulin, Special to The Times
The Afghanistan that Khaled Hosseini remembers from his childhood in the early '70s -- before the communists and the Taliban, the dictators and the wars -- is counterintuitive to most Americans, trained by nearly a quarter-century of news reports to consider the country a ravaged wasteland.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 2007 | Jane Ciabattari, Special to The Times
AFGHAN-BORN novelist Khaled Hosseini is back with his long-awaited second novel, "A Thousand Splendid Suns." (The book's title was inspired by lines from the 17th century Persian poet Saib-e-Tabrizi's ode to Kabul, Hosseini's birthplace: "One could not count the moons that shimmer on her roofs, / Or the thousand splendid suns that hide behind her walls."
BOOKS
August 12, 2007
1. Water for Elephants by Sara Gruen ($13.95) 2. The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini ($16) 3. The Road by Cormac McCarthy ($14.95) Fiction 4. The Emperor's Children by Claire Messud ($14.95) 5. The Memory Keeper's Daughter by Kim Edwards ($14) Nonfiction 1. Eat, Pray, Love by Elizabeth Gilbert ($15) 2. Blink by Malcolm Gladwell ($15.99) 3. The Glass Castle by Jeannette Walls ($14) 4. Three Cups of Tea by Greg Mortenson and David Oliver Relin ($15) 5.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 16, 2008 | From Reuters
Afghanistan has banned the import and exhibition of "The Kite Runner," a film about the troubled friendship of two Afghan boys. The decision was made "because some of its scenes are questionable and unacceptable for some people . . . and would cause trouble for the government and people," a government official said. Paramount, the studio behind the adaptation of the 2003 bestselling novel by U.S.-based Afghan author Khaled Hosseini, last year had to get its three young stars out of their homeland before the movie premiered to protect them from a possible backlash.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 13, 2007 | Josh Getlin, Times Staff Writer
For a painfully shy fiction writer who insists he has no political agenda, Khaled Hosseini learned the power of international celebrity -- and his own voice -- in a hurry. Just before he became a bestselling author, the San Jose-area doctor took a trip to his native Afghanistan in 2003. His first book, "The Kite Runner," had not yet appeared, and he had no clue it was about to become a publishing sensation.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 2007 | Jane Ciabattari, Special to The Times
AFGHAN-BORN novelist Khaled Hosseini is back with his long-awaited second novel, "A Thousand Splendid Suns." (The book's title was inspired by lines from the 17th century Persian poet Saib-e-Tabrizi's ode to Kabul, Hosseini's birthplace: "One could not count the moons that shimmer on her roofs, / Or the thousand splendid suns that hide behind her walls."
ENTERTAINMENT
July 8, 2003 | David L. Ulin, Special to The Times
The Afghanistan that Khaled Hosseini remembers from his childhood in the early '70s -- before the communists and the Taliban, the dictators and the wars -- is counterintuitive to most Americans, trained by nearly a quarter-century of news reports to consider the country a ravaged wasteland.
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