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Khallid Abdul Muhammad

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 18, 2001 | SOLOMON MOORE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Khallid Abdul Muhammad, a former Nation of Islam lieutenant who was known for his anti-Semitic speeches, his uncompromising hatred of "white devils" and his accounts of the "black Holocaust" of slavery, died Saturday. He was 53. Muhammad was admitted to Wellstar Kennestone Hospital in Marietta, Ga., on Tuesday after apparently suffering a brain aneurysm.
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NEWS
February 25, 2001 | From Associated Press
A coffin bearing black militant Khallid Abdul Muhammad was carried through the streets of Harlem on Saturday after a funeral service that mingled warm memories and harsh rhetoric. "Long live Khallid Muhammad! Long live Khallid Muhammad!" scores of mourners shouted as they marched up Malcolm X Boulevard behind black-clad pallbearers from Muhammad's New Black Panther Party.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 27, 1994 | CARLA HALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He says he's a teacher. He says he's at war. But most black and white leaders tend to describe Khallid Abdul Muhammad with words like these: repugnant, vile, anti-Semitic. Muhammad, the 43-year-old former senior aide to Louis Farrakhan, head of the Nation of Islam, became more controversial than his mentor for remarks at a Nov. 29 speech at Kean College in New Jersey. He said that Jews and Arabs were "the bloodsuckers of the black nation and the black community."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 18, 2001 | SOLOMON MOORE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Khallid Abdul Muhammad, a former Nation of Islam lieutenant who was known for his anti-Semitic speeches, his uncompromising hatred of "white devils" and his accounts of the "black Holocaust" of slavery, died Saturday. He was 53. Muhammad was admitted to Wellstar Kennestone Hospital in Marietta, Ga., on Tuesday after apparently suffering a brain aneurysm.
NEWS
March 1, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
New Jersey's political Establishment turned out in force to denounce bigotry in anticipation of a speech by a controversial member of the Nation of Islam. But Khallid Abdul Muhammad offered a more subdued message than expected before an audience of about 350 at Trenton State College, his first public speaking engagement in New Jersey since his Nov. 29 polemic attacking Jews, Catholics, homosexuals and some black leaders.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 19, 1994
In light of the recent controversy surrounding Minister Louis Farrakhan, Ron Harris' column, "Ugly Words Don't Erase the Good Works of the Nation of Islam" (Feb. 11), was far from the mark in seeking to clarify or remove these tensions; rather it reinforces the very ideas of Farrakhan. Harris begins with a false conclusion, namely that Farrakhan apologized. In reality, Farrakhan remains committed to the "truths" expressed by his demoted lieutenant, Khallid Abdul Muhammad. For some curious reason, Harris accepts the premise that black Americans see in the Nation of Islam "the best of themselves."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 8, 1994
In response to "Ex-Aide to Farrakhan Shot in Legs," May 30: At long last, racial and religious intolerance has become an equal opportunity employer. As a traditionalist merchant of hate, Khallid Abdul Muhammad aims his message at those who have suffered economic and social oppression. Like his intellectual forebears, he fabricates history in order to scapegoat others for the sufferings of his target audience. He seeks to dignify his message by marketing it to those in the academic community who accept his rhetoric without first submitting it to tests of reason.
NEWS
June 4, 1994 | Associated Press
Nation of Islam preacher Khallid Abdul Muhammad left the hospital in a wheelchair Friday, six days after being wounded in an ambush. Muhammad, 46, former spokesman for the black Muslim group, was shot in the legs Sunday after giving a speech at UC Riverside. Four bodyguards and a bystander also were wounded. James Edward Bess, 49, a defrocked minister of the Nation of Islam, pleaded not guilty to charges of attempted murder and assault. Police believe he acted alone.
NEWS
February 25, 2001 | From Associated Press
A coffin bearing black militant Khallid Abdul Muhammad was carried through the streets of Harlem on Saturday after a funeral service that mingled warm memories and harsh rhetoric. "Long live Khallid Muhammad! Long live Khallid Muhammad!" scores of mourners shouted as they marched up Malcolm X Boulevard behind black-clad pallbearers from Muhammad's New Black Panther Party.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 14, 1995 | AMY WALLACE, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
The former president of Howard University, one of the nation's foremost black colleges, warned his fellow higher education administrators Monday to prepare for a contentious debate over affirmative action that could split America "right down the middle." Speaking at the annual American Council on Education conference here, Franklyn G. Jenifer recalled the furor that erupted after Khallid Abdul Muhammad, a former aide to Nation of Islam leader Louis Farrakhan, delivered an anti-Semitic speech at Howard University last spring.
NEWS
September 2, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
A federal appeals court upheld a ruling forcing New York City to allow a youth march organized by a former Nation of Islam spokesman who espouses hatred for whites and Jews. The U.S. 2nd Circuit Court of Appeals backed a court ruling that denial of a permit for the Million Youth March violates free speech rights. The decision allows for the march to take place Saturday in Harlem. The rally is organized by Kahlid Abdul Muhammad, who is known for derogatory remarks about Jews and whites.
NEWS
March 8, 1996 | TOM GORMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Muslim preacher was convicted Thursday of the attempted murder of former Nation of Islam spokesman Khallid Abdul Muhammad during an appearance nearly two years ago at UC Riverside, and now faces a sentence of life in prison. Riverside County Deputy Dist. Atty. Bill Mitchell said he did not anticipate James E. Bess, 51, ever being released on parole.
NEWS
February 28, 1996 | TOM GORMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former Nation of Islam firebrand spokesman Khallid Abdul Muhammad, suggesting disregard for the criminal justice system, testified Tuesday that the man who shot him nearly two years ago should not be sent to prison--but rather have his head cut off in accordance with "God's justice." Muhammad made his remarks when asked whether he could identify James Bess as the man who allegedly tried to murder him as he was addressing a crowd at UC Riverside on May 29, 1994.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 14, 1995 | AMY WALLACE, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
The former president of Howard University, one of the nation's foremost black colleges, warned his fellow higher education administrators Monday to prepare for a contentious debate over affirmative action that could split America "right down the middle." Speaking at the annual American Council on Education conference here, Franklyn G. Jenifer recalled the furor that erupted after Khallid Abdul Muhammad, a former aide to Nation of Islam leader Louis Farrakhan, delivered an anti-Semitic speech at Howard University last spring.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 8, 1994
In response to "Ex-Aide to Farrakhan Shot in Legs," May 30: At long last, racial and religious intolerance has become an equal opportunity employer. As a traditionalist merchant of hate, Khallid Abdul Muhammad aims his message at those who have suffered economic and social oppression. Like his intellectual forebears, he fabricates history in order to scapegoat others for the sufferings of his target audience. He seeks to dignify his message by marketing it to those in the academic community who accept his rhetoric without first submitting it to tests of reason.
NEWS
June 4, 1994 | Associated Press
Nation of Islam preacher Khallid Abdul Muhammad left the hospital in a wheelchair Friday, six days after being wounded in an ambush. Muhammad, 46, former spokesman for the black Muslim group, was shot in the legs Sunday after giving a speech at UC Riverside. Four bodyguards and a bystander also were wounded. James Edward Bess, 49, a defrocked minister of the Nation of Islam, pleaded not guilty to charges of attempted murder and assault. Police believe he acted alone.
NEWS
March 8, 1996 | TOM GORMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Muslim preacher was convicted Thursday of the attempted murder of former Nation of Islam spokesman Khallid Abdul Muhammad during an appearance nearly two years ago at UC Riverside, and now faces a sentence of life in prison. Riverside County Deputy Dist. Atty. Bill Mitchell said he did not anticipate James E. Bess, 51, ever being released on parole.
NEWS
February 28, 1996 | TOM GORMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former Nation of Islam firebrand spokesman Khallid Abdul Muhammad, suggesting disregard for the criminal justice system, testified Tuesday that the man who shot him nearly two years ago should not be sent to prison--but rather have his head cut off in accordance with "God's justice." Muhammad made his remarks when asked whether he could identify James Bess as the man who allegedly tried to murder him as he was addressing a crowd at UC Riverside on May 29, 1994.
NEWS
June 2, 1994 | TOM GORMAN and SUSAN MOFFAT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
An apparently distracted James Edward Bess locked his keys in his car at UC Riverside about an hour before he allegedly shot Nation of Islam speaker Khallid Abdul Muhammad--and campus police came to his rescue, university officials said Wednesday. After police confirmed that Bess had rightful use of the vehicle and opened it for him, Bess moved the vehicle from a housing complex across the street from the gymnasium where Muhammad had begun speaking 45 minutes earlier.
NEWS
June 1, 1994 | ANDREA FORD and MARK ARAX, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
When James E. Bess was arrested in the attempted slaying of a Nation of Islam leader in Riverside, those who had known him in recent years found the outburst of violence out of character. But his past as a young Muslim was marked by serious clashes that resulted in arrests, convictions and the death of his brother. In the mid-1960s, Bess was convicted of manslaughter in Missouri and of assault in Fresno, according to newspaper accounts at the time.
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