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Khe Sanh

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 20, 2013 | By Tony Perry
SAN DIEGO - When the battle was over, Marines who fought in Vietnam labeled Hill 881 South “a deadly killing zone” in the long siege of Khe Sanh . Twenty-seven Marines were killed and 50 wounded - in all, 75% of the force that had been sent that day in April 1967 to wrest the hill from the dug-in enemy. (Khe Sanh was the scene of protracted sieges in 1967 and 1968.) Marine losses would have been even greater except for the courage of two Marine privates who were scared of dying but more scared of letting down their buddies.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 20, 2013 | By Tony Perry
SAN DIEGO - When the battle was over, Marines who fought in Vietnam labeled Hill 881 South “a deadly killing zone” in the long siege of Khe Sanh . Twenty-seven Marines were killed and 50 wounded - in all, 75% of the force that had been sent that day in April 1967 to wrest the hill from the dug-in enemy. (Khe Sanh was the scene of protracted sieges in 1967 and 1968.) Marine losses would have been even greater except for the courage of two Marine privates who were scared of dying but more scared of letting down their buddies.
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NEWS
February 13, 1993 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As dark clouds glower overhead and a cold wind kicks up stinging red grit, Le Dai shuffles slowly down the path, carrying a simple hoe and scythe on one shoulder and dragging a left leg made of wood. "I stepped on a mine," he explains. "I was seeking the steel." Twenty-five years after one of the fiercest and most controversial battles in the Vietnam War, the former U.S. Marine base at Khe Sanh is still claiming victims.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 6, 2008 | Tony Perry
The remains of a Marine from Los Angeles killed during the Vietnam War have been identified and returned to his family for burial, the Department of Defense announced. Lance Cpl. Luis F. Palacios will be buried Friday in Bellflower, the department said. Palacios was among 12 killed when their CH-46A Sea Knight helicopter was shot down on June 6, 1968, near Khe Sanh. Eight bodies were recovered. But Palacios and three other Marines remained unaccounted for. In 2007, military identification specialists, working with the government of Vietnam, excavated a spot where villagers said the crash had occurred.
NEWS
January 30, 1999 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Thirty-one years ago, when Khe Sanh was part of the world's vocabulary, one of the defining moments of the Vietnam War was being played out in this mist-shrouded valley near the Laotian border.
NEWS
September 18, 1986 | Associated Press
Vietnamese villagers have begun to plant coffee near Khe Sanh, a former U.S. Marine base and site of one of the best-known battles of the Vietnam War, Vietnam's official news agency said Wednesday. For 77 days, from January to April 1968, the Marines withstood a siege by North Vietnamese forces at Khe Sanh. U.S. warplanes dropped nearly 100,000 tons of bombs on enemy positions in the surrounding mountains.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 31, 1990
Tour the Ho Chi Minh Trail? A friendly jaunt to Khe Sanh? Your two-parter on Vietnam tourism stirred me, a Vietnam vet, to want to go back to Vietnam--in a B-52. GREG HUGHES, Chatsworth
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 6, 2008 | Tony Perry
The remains of a Marine from Los Angeles killed during the Vietnam War have been identified and returned to his family for burial, the Department of Defense announced. Lance Cpl. Luis F. Palacios will be buried Friday in Bellflower, the department said. Palacios was among 12 killed when their CH-46A Sea Knight helicopter was shot down on June 6, 1968, near Khe Sanh. Eight bodies were recovered. But Palacios and three other Marines remained unaccounted for. In 2007, military identification specialists, working with the government of Vietnam, excavated a spot where villagers said the crash had occurred.
NEWS
November 27, 1994 | MORT ROSENBLUM, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Here it's a dirt track, unmarked and unmapped, lazing through lush green like any Carolina country lane except that kids know better than to kick at odd bits of metal in the grass. High up the mountain, it is a widened rut in the rocks and mud where drivers stop their trucks at precarious turns, night or day, to light incense at roadside shrines to the unrecovered dead.
NEWS
July 20, 2000 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Ho Chi Minh Trail, which carried a million North Vietnamese soldiers south and confounded the United States' top military strategists for a decade, belongs to history now, its network of hidden dirt roads reclaimed by jungle, leeches and ghosts of a war long past. But though abandoned, there is hardly anything or anyone, save Ho Chi Minh himself, that the Vietnamese of the north hold more dear than the supply route that was once the world's deadliest road.
NEWS
July 20, 2000 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Ho Chi Minh Trail, which carried a million North Vietnamese soldiers south and confounded the United States' top military strategists for a decade, belongs to history now, its network of hidden dirt roads reclaimed by jungle, leeches and ghosts of a war long past. But though abandoned, there is hardly anything or anyone, save Ho Chi Minh himself, that the Vietnamese of the north hold more dear than the supply route that was once the world's deadliest road.
NEWS
May 27, 1999 | LEEF SMITH, THE WASHINGTON POST
The last time anyone saw the chaplain and his aide alive was on an airstrip at Khe Sanh. As they came under attack from the North Vietnamese army, they waved off a helicopter set to take them away and prepared instead to do their jobs. For three long months during the Vietnam War, Chaplain Robert Brett, 33, and Pfc.
NEWS
January 30, 1999 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Thirty-one years ago, when Khe Sanh was part of the world's vocabulary, one of the defining moments of the Vietnam War was being played out in this mist-shrouded valley near the Laotian border.
NEWS
November 27, 1994 | MORT ROSENBLUM, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Here it's a dirt track, unmarked and unmapped, lazing through lush green like any Carolina country lane except that kids know better than to kick at odd bits of metal in the grass. High up the mountain, it is a widened rut in the rocks and mud where drivers stop their trucks at precarious turns, night or day, to light incense at roadside shrines to the unrecovered dead.
NEWS
February 13, 1993 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As dark clouds glower overhead and a cold wind kicks up stinging red grit, Le Dai shuffles slowly down the path, carrying a simple hoe and scythe on one shoulder and dragging a left leg made of wood. "I stepped on a mine," he explains. "I was seeking the steel." Twenty-five years after one of the fiercest and most controversial battles in the Vietnam War, the former U.S. Marine base at Khe Sanh is still claiming victims.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 31, 1990
Tour the Ho Chi Minh Trail? A friendly jaunt to Khe Sanh? Your two-parter on Vietnam tourism stirred me, a Vietnam vet, to want to go back to Vietnam--in a B-52. GREG HUGHES, Chatsworth
NEWS
May 27, 1999 | LEEF SMITH, THE WASHINGTON POST
The last time anyone saw the chaplain and his aide alive was on an airstrip at Khe Sanh. As they came under attack from the North Vietnamese army, they waved off a helicopter set to take them away and prepared instead to do their jobs. For three long months during the Vietnam War, Chaplain Robert Brett, 33, and Pfc.
NEWS
May 11, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
A decorated Vietnam War veteran who was executed in California last week for murdering an elderly woman was laid to rest with military honors in his hometown, Wareham, Mass. About 75 people attended the ceremony for Manuel Babbitt. Babbitt, who served with the Marines through the bloody 77-day siege of Khe Sanh in 1968, was sentenced to die for killing Leah Schendel in 1980. Babbitt's supporters said he was out of his mind the night he attacked the 78-year-old woman.
NEWS
September 18, 1986 | Associated Press
Vietnamese villagers have begun to plant coffee near Khe Sanh, a former U.S. Marine base and site of one of the best-known battles of the Vietnam War, Vietnam's official news agency said Wednesday. For 77 days, from January to April 1968, the Marines withstood a siege by North Vietnamese forces at Khe Sanh. U.S. warplanes dropped nearly 100,000 tons of bombs on enemy positions in the surrounding mountains.
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