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ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 1987 | DENNIS McDOUGAL, Times Staff Writer
Oral Roberts will not be telling his Los Angeles television audience that he will die if his viewers don't send money on this week's show. "Expect a Miracle," the Tulsa-based evangelist's 30-minute program that airs over KHJ-TV Channel 9 at 9 a.m. on Sunday, is "clean" of such pitches from the 68-year-old Roberts, according to KHJ-TV programming chief Walt Baker. "We have seen the tape this morning and, in fact, it is clean," Baker told The Times Friday.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 2014 | Steve Chawkins
Geoff Edwards, a Los Angeles radio personality and TV game show host who for years flew weekly to Sacramento to emcee the California Lottery's "Big Spin," died Wednesday at St. John's Health Center in Santa Monica. He was 83. His death was caused by complications from pneumonia, his agent Fred Wostbrock said. Over the years, Edwards hosted 10 game shows, including "Jackpot" and "Treasure Hunt. " On radio, he was a clever talker who sprinkled music and news with homegrown bits like "The Answer Lady.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 13, 1985 | LEE MARGULIES
In the wake of a poor performance during the November ratings sweeps, KHJ-TV Channel 9 will be overhauling its weekday programming schedule next month, moving reruns of "Dallas" to an afternoon slot, introducing a million-dollar game show and dropping its 10 p.m. movie. "Dallas" ran last in its time period during the sweeps period, and the movie package barely managed to stay even with some of the newscasts on the other Los Angeles independents.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 1, 2010 | By Carla Rivera
Gene Chenault, one half of a pioneering team that helped to revolutionize rock radio programming in the 1960s with the "Boss Radio" format, first at KHJ in Los Angeles and then coast to coast, has died. He was 90. Chenault died of non-Hodgkin lymphoma Tuesday at Providence Tarzana Medical Center, said his wife, Susan. In the 1960s, Chenault partnered with Bill Drake to launch a phenomenally successful radio format that turned poorly performing stations into ratings winners and made household names of radio personalities such as Robert W. Morgan and "the Real" Don Steele.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 9, 1993
I was the program director at KHJ during the first five years of its "Boss Radio" format (1965-69), after which I joined former KRLA competitor Casey Kasem to co-create "American Top 40." Your story rightfully pays tribute to some great broadcast professionals, who, like the music they play, continue to maintain their appeal. As in any endeavor, much of their success derived from diligent behind-the-scenes effort. Robert W. Morgan, Don Steele and Harvey Miller are prime examples that KHJ's operating philosophy of "preparation, concentration and moderation" remains an effective dictum.
MAGAZINE
February 21, 1988
As a former KNXT staffer, I read with considerable interest "Broadcast News, L.A." However, Channel 2 was not known as KNXT in 1947. As an experimental television station (I believe it was the second in the country), it had been broadcasting since the 1930s as W6XAO, with studios and transmitter atop Mt. Lee in Hollywood, just above the Hollywood sign. When it was licensed for commercial broadcasting (that may have been 1947), the call letters were changed to KTSL, named for Tommy Lee, son of a prominent Southern California auto dealer and owner of KHJ radio.
BUSINESS
February 3, 1987 | KATHRYN HARRIS, Times Staff Writer
Despite industry speculation, GenCorp and MCA said Monday that they're not discussing a reduction in the price of GenCorp's WOR-TV, the New Jersey television station that MCA agreed last year to acquire for $387 million. One published report said MCA might seek a lower price because of a slump in national advertising and other problems besetting independent TV stations. "If they are, we'd like to get some communication from them," said Joseph Leyden, assistant to GenCorp President A.
BUSINESS
August 12, 1987 | KATHRYN HARRIS, Times Staff Writer
RKO General, the once-giant broadcasting company mired in a decades-old battle to defend its suitability as a license holder, suffered another blow Tuesday when an FCC administrative law judge ruled that the company is unfit to run KHJ-TV Channel 9 in Los Angeles and 13 other television and radio stations across the land. RKO immediately said it would appeal the decision and does not expect the ruling to harm its 5-month-old agreement to sell KHJ-TV to Walt Disney Co.
NEWS
October 20, 1987 | DOUGLAS JEHL, Times Staff Writer
RKO General Monday asked the Federal Communications Commission to reverse a decision revoking the company's licenses to operate KHJ-TV Channel 9 in Los Angeles and 13 other television and radio stations across the country. In a strongly worded appeal, RKO denounced the decision by an FCC administrative judge as one-sided, calling it "extraordinary in the number of its errors, both factual and legal, and in the extravagance of its rhetoric."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 4, 2009 | Steve Harvey
It was the case of the missing deejay. When a Pasadena radio station rechristened itself KRLA and began to rock and roll in 1959, one of its jocks, Perry Allen, was absent. KRLA started a "Find Perry Allen" campaign and promised $10,000 to any listener who could track him down in those pre-Google days. What mischievous KRLA didn't say was that it knew where Allen was: working at his old station in Buffalo, waiting for his contract to expire. But KRLA's rival, KFWB, knew.
SPORTS
August 22, 2007 | Larry Stewart, Times Staff Writer
In the pre-David Beckham era, preempting a Dodgers or Angels radio broadcast for soccer -- even on Spanish-language radio -- would have been unthinkable. But not now, as the landscape of the Southern California sports scene continues to change. The Dodgers announced Tuesday a three-year deal that will put their games on Spanish-language KHJ 930 beginning next season, thus ending a long relationship with KWKW 1330.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 1, 2002 | Steve Harvey
No wonder he wasn't worried about the police being summoned: The crime log of the Los Alamitos News-Enterprise reported: "A 20-something man with a shaved head seen standing in a resident's side yard for 10 minutes was a dummy." Big numbers: When I spoke at my son's elementary school career day, one of the students, 9-year-old Jordan Curry, asked me if I use math in my job. I assured him I do--often as a service to readers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 7, 1997 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The death Tuesday of deejay "the Real" Don Steele evoked the mega-decibel cries of late 1960s Top 40 radio when Steele and other "boss jocks" ruled the airwaves and captured Los Angeles' hip teenagers as the audience of 93-KHJ. "It's 3 o'clock in Boss Angelese! Hey hey HEY! Thitz me. The Real Don Steele!" he would scream through dashboard speakers and teen hangouts during radio's afternoon drive time on a typical Friday. "A billion-dollar weekend there. . . .
ENTERTAINMENT
May 9, 1993
I was the program director at KHJ during the first five years of its "Boss Radio" format (1965-69), after which I joined former KRLA competitor Casey Kasem to co-create "American Top 40." Your story rightfully pays tribute to some great broadcast professionals, who, like the music they play, continue to maintain their appeal. As in any endeavor, much of their success derived from diligent behind-the-scenes effort. Robert W. Morgan, Don Steele and Harvey Miller are prime examples that KHJ's operating philosophy of "preparation, concentration and moderation" remains an effective dictum.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 1993 | CLAUDIA PUIG, Claudia Puig is a Times staff writer
The year was 1966. A late-night call came in to the switchboard at KHJ-AM, Los Angeles' powerhouse rock 'n' roll station. On the line was Brian Wilson, the creative force behind the Beach Boys, the local surf band that had already attained superstar status. He was calling from the recording studio where he had just finished cutting the seminal rock record "Good Vibrations." Did KHJ want to be the first to play it? "Bands would cut a record on Tuesday, and Wednesday they'd give us a tape," recalled former KHJ deejay Charlie Tuna.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 1993 | CLAUDIA PUIG, Claudia Puig is a Times staff writer
The year was 1966. A late-night call came in to the switchboard at KHJ-AM, Los Angeles' powerhouse rock 'n' roll station. On the line was Brian Wilson, the creative force behind the Beach Boys, the local surf band that had already attained superstar status. He was calling from the recording studio where he had just finished cutting the seminal rock record "Good Vibrations." Did KHJ want to be the first to play it? "Bands would cut a record on Tuesday, and Wednesday they'd give us a tape," recalled former KHJ deejay Charlie Tuna.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 9, 1990 | GREG BRAXTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They were more than just the kings of the radio dial. They were more than just No. 1. They were Boss. More accurately, they were the Boss Jocks, spinning those Boss Hits for an adoring, young and huge Boss Radio audience in Boss Angeles. Even some of their names had more than a hint of Bossness to them--the Real Don Steele, Humble Harve, Dave Diamond, Sam Riddle, Walt Baby Love, Charlie Tuna. Back then, the Beatles were fighting for chart space with the Mamas & the Papas and Dylan.
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