Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsKhoa Le
IN THE NEWS

Khoa Le

MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
June 3, 1995 | BENJAMIN EPSTEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When the Pacific Symphony decided to commemorate the human suffering inflicted by the Vietnam War, the orchestra commissioned a composer whose specialty is movie soundtracks. The hoopla heralding the premiere in April was befitting of a Hollywood opening, although classical-music critics generally said the piece played like a B movie. That commission came about two years ago.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 4, 1995 | ZAN DUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Described by one concert-goer as "an orchestration of East and West components," the symphonic suite "1975" by Vietnamese American composer Khoa Le was given its world premiere Saturday at the Orange County Performing Arts Center. Le fled his native land two decades ago when Saigon fell to the Communists. He now lives in Orange. The piece, which incorporates traditional Vietnamese music and folk songs, is the tale of a village sundered by war, and it stirred strong emotions.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 4, 1995 | ZAN DUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Described by one concert-goer as "an orchestration of East and West components," the symphonic suite "1975" by Vietnamese American composer Khoa Le was given its world premiere Saturday at the Orange County Performing Arts Center. Le fled his native land two decades ago when Saigon fell to the Communists. He now lives in Orange. The piece, which incorporates traditional Vietnamese music and folk songs, is the tale of a village sundered by war, and it stirred strong emotions.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 3, 1995 | BENJAMIN EPSTEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When the Pacific Symphony decided to commemorate the human suffering inflicted by the Vietnam War, the orchestra commissioned a composer whose specialty is movie soundtracks. The hoopla heralding the premiere in April was befitting of a Hollywood opening, although classical-music critics generally said the piece played like a B movie. That commission came about two years ago.
NEWS
March 13, 1995 | ZAN DUBIN
April 13: Performance of traditional music by Nguyen Thuyet Phong and ensemble. Time and place to be announced. Organized by the Vietnamese American Arts and Letters Assn. (VAALA). (714) 537-8352. * April 26 and 27, 8 p.m.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 19, 1995
Next month will mark the 20th anniversary of the Communist takeover of Vietnam, a traumatic event that sent hundreds of thousands of refugees fleeing to the United States, many of them to Orange County. Here and in other communities across the country that the refugees and their America-born children now call home, the anniversary has become an occasion to take stock of what was gained and what was lost.
NEWS
March 13, 1995 | RICK VANDERKNYFF, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ngoc Nuoi was a girl of 14 when she was introduced to the ornate and studied ritual of the cai luong , the centuries-old Vietnamese art comparable in form to Western opera. Through a friend who was studying the cai luong , she was approached to train at the major conservatory in Saigon where she was to work with some of the country's most famous teachers. Eventually she joined a top company, Tieng Chuong, and became one of its most prominent and revered stars.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 12, 1995 | RICK VANDERKNYFF, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A series of cultural events designed to commemorate two decades since the first Vietnamese refugees' arrival has been beset by behind-the-scenes political turmoil over the scheduling of a fund-raising event. Organizers of Project 20 have been careful to articulate that their goal is to celebrate the accomplishments of Vietnamese Americans.
NEWS
March 12, 1995 | ZAN DUBIN and RICK VANDERKNYFF, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Behind the business facades of Bolsa Avenue and Westminster Boulevard, inside the walls of modest homes in tidy suburban neighborhoods, the heart of a vibrant artistic community pumps. At nightclubs such as the Ritz and the Majestic, elegantly dressed couples dance as singers switch effortlessly from waltzes to rock to rap. Record stores are lined with hundreds of CDs, nearly all recorded in Orange County by local singers and musicians.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|