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Kidnapings Mexico

NEWS
July 1, 1997 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Five archeologists missing in eastern Mexico since Friday, when they were bushwhacked by Indian marauders while attempting to rescue a valuable Maya monument, stumbled into a small village Monday night, exhausted and naked but apparently not seriously harmed. The five were taken to the city of Palenque where they were recuperating from their ordeal, said Mexican archeologist Alfonso Morales, who lives in the city.
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NEWS
April 26, 1997 | Reuters
Six kidnappers and their hostage were killed in a failed rescue attempt by Mexican police in the northern state of Coahuila, police said Friday. A police rescue team stormed the kidnappers' hide-out late Thursday in the city of Torreon and shot dead all six abductors, police said. But the hostage was also killed in the gun battle between the police and the kidnappers. The kidnappers had demanded a $250,000 ransom for businessman Jose Antonio Garcia Cantelli, police said.
NEWS
March 16, 1997 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Carmen Genis' business is booming--for all the wrong reasons. The feisty, 40-year-old travel agent is setting sales records as her tiny storefront agency here sells hundreds of cut-rate air tickets each week to peasants fleeing this deeply troubled state of Morelos. Most are headed for Tijuana and then, they say, points north--illegal journeys across California's southern border.
NEWS
November 8, 1996 | ANNE-MARIE O'CONNOR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Five men believed to be involved in the August kidnapping of a Japanese business executive in Tijuana were arrested in the Mexican state of Sonora, authorities said Thursday. Police arrested the men Monday in the town of Agua Prieta after they allegedly spent U.S. dollars with serial numbers that matched the cash paid to free an abducted Chihuahua businessman in August, said Carlos Castillo, the deputy attorney general of Sonora.
NEWS
September 20, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
A newspaper editor kidnapped this week was freed by captors who he said grilled him about his contact with a new leftist rebel group. Razhy Gonzalez, editor of Contrapunto, a small weekly in Oaxaca, told reporters that he had been roughed up and threatened. He said he suspected his abductors belonged to some kind of police force or security agency.
NEWS
September 19, 1996 | MARY BETH SHERIDAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Masked gunmen kidnapped a newspaper editor who had reported widely on an emerging rebel group, raising fears among some journalists and politicians that he could be a victim of an anti-guerrilla crackdown by government security forces. Razhy Gonzalez was leaving his office in the southern city of Oaxaca with a friend about 11 p.m. Tuesday when he was cut off by a car, according to a communique by local journalists that was confirmed by authorities.
NEWS
September 18, 1996 | ANNE-MARIE O'CONNOR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Losing their only break in a case that created a furor in Mexico's foreign business community, authorities Tuesday released for lack of evidence a cabdriver arrested in connection with the Aug. 10 kidnapping of a Japanese business executive, police and prison spokesmen said. Genaro Maldonado Topete, 28, was freed Tuesday afternoon from the State Public Jail in downtown Tijuana after prosecutors failed to adequately support their case against him, said Cynthia Silva, a spokesman for the facility.
NEWS
September 5, 1996 | CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Under pressure to solve the kidnapping of a Sanyo official in Tijuana last month, authorities Wednesday released a wanted poster of eight suspects and said an unidentified Mexican police official is "most likely" involved in the crime. Baja California Atty. Gen. Jose Luis Anaya Bautista would not give any more information on the policeman suspected in the Aug. 10 kidnapping, saying only that he was not connected to Baja California law enforcement.
NEWS
September 4, 1996 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Amid official disclosures that Mexico's new ultra-leftist rebels are "urban terrorists" who may have financed an arsenal of modern assault weapons with tens of millions of dollars from a kidnapping ransom, the Mexican government wrestled Tuesday with a new setback in its effort to bring peace to the impoverished countryside.
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