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Kidnapings Mexico

NEWS
September 19, 1996 | MARY BETH SHERIDAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Masked gunmen kidnapped a newspaper editor who had reported widely on an emerging rebel group, raising fears among some journalists and politicians that he could be a victim of an anti-guerrilla crackdown by government security forces. Razhy Gonzalez was leaving his office in the southern city of Oaxaca with a friend about 11 p.m. Tuesday when he was cut off by a car, according to a communique by local journalists that was confirmed by authorities.
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NEWS
September 18, 1996 | ANNE-MARIE O'CONNOR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Losing their only break in a case that created a furor in Mexico's foreign business community, authorities Tuesday released for lack of evidence a cabdriver arrested in connection with the Aug. 10 kidnapping of a Japanese business executive, police and prison spokesmen said. Genaro Maldonado Topete, 28, was freed Tuesday afternoon from the State Public Jail in downtown Tijuana after prosecutors failed to adequately support their case against him, said Cynthia Silva, a spokesman for the facility.
NEWS
September 5, 1996 | CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Under pressure to solve the kidnapping of a Sanyo official in Tijuana last month, authorities Wednesday released a wanted poster of eight suspects and said an unidentified Mexican police official is "most likely" involved in the crime. Baja California Atty. Gen. Jose Luis Anaya Bautista would not give any more information on the policeman suspected in the Aug. 10 kidnapping, saying only that he was not connected to Baja California law enforcement.
NEWS
September 4, 1996 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Amid official disclosures that Mexico's new ultra-leftist rebels are "urban terrorists" who may have financed an arsenal of modern assault weapons with tens of millions of dollars from a kidnapping ransom, the Mexican government wrestled Tuesday with a new setback in its effort to bring peace to the impoverished countryside.
NEWS
August 21, 1996 | CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A day after gaining his freedom, the Japanese executive held captive for more than a week by Mexican kidnappers said he plans to rest, enjoy his family and "savor the sweetness of freedom." "This last week was one of the worst weeks of my life," Mamoru Konno said. Looking tired and emotionally drained, Konno, 57, read a brief statement to dozens of reporters, many of them representing Japanese news media, at a news conference at Sanyo North America Corp.'s San Diego headquarters.
NEWS
August 20, 1996 | CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ending a nine-day ordeal that raised doubts about security in Mexico's fast-growing maquiladora industry, a Japanese executive was released by kidnappers early Monday on the outskirts of Tijuana after his company paid a $2-million ransom in unmarked U.S. currency, Mexican police said. Mamoru Konno, 57, president of Sanyo's Video Component Corp.
BUSINESS
August 16, 1996 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The recent kidnapping of a Japanese executive in Tijuana has kicked up a public debate over the continuing difficulties of Japanese corporations in managing crises. Despite rising crime and terrorism both here and abroad, Japanese firms still lack the crisis management systems, security executives and intelligence services that most major Western firms take for granted, analysts say.
NEWS
August 15, 1996 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When two cars packed with armed men blocked the businessman's Gran Marquis and pulled him from the driver's seat outside a luxurious suburban mall here, it was the victim's expression that was so terrifying: A gun to his head and armed men on each elbow, his face, witnesses said, twisted in a grimace of powerlessness, fear and a fight to keep his dignity. Then, in just 30 seconds, the victim was gone--racing away in the kidnappers' car.
NEWS
August 14, 1996 | CHRIS KRAUL and ANNE-MARIE O'CONNOR, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
As of Tuesday, three days after Sanyo executive Mamoru Konno was abducted by armed kidnappers at a park outside Tijuana, his Japanese employer still had not filed a formal report with Mexican authorities, highlighting how Latin American kidnapping victims' families and employers often deal directly with the perpetrators. Konno was still missing, so why not inform the police?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 2, 1995
The U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals on Friday upheld the conviction of a Mexican man who conspired to torture and murder a U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration agent who helped break up a giant marijuana farm. The court ruled in Los Angeles that the abduction of Juan Ramon Matta-Ballesteros to bring him to trial in the United States was insufficient grounds to dismiss his conviction by a Los Angeles federal court jury.
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