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Kidney Cancer

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NEWS
January 9, 1990 | Reuters
Ousted East German leader Erich Honecker, suffering from kidney cancer, was hospitalized Monday, the official ADN news agency said. Honecker, 77, is facing charges of corruption and misrule during his 17-year leadership. ADN did not mention what specific treatment he will undergo. Doctors determined Friday that Honecker is too ill to be sent to prison if found guilty.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
July 1, 2013 | By E. Scott Reckard
The prospect of a bidding war for Onyx Pharmaceuticals Inc. in South San Francisco is sending biotechnology shares sharply higher, helping propel an advance in the broader stock market. Onyx, a developer of anti-cancer drugs, said Sunday it had rejected a “significantly undervalued” takeover bid of $120 a share from Amgen Inc., the Thousand Oaks biotech giant. But it added that it was “actively exploring” the possibility of selling itself to another bidder. That was all investors needed to hear, sending Onyx shares soaring by $43.74, a gain of more than 50%, in midday trading Monday.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 3, 1988
Patients with advanced kidney cancer who have had a kidney surgically removed are being sought for a clinical trial of a new treatment at the Kenneth Norris Jr. Cancer Hospital of USC. Candidates must have measurable disease, have no spread of cancer to the brain, no heart disease, be between 18 and 70 years old and be in a physical condition that would permit daily visits to the hospital for 8 weeks of outpatient therapy. For more information, call (800) 522-6237.
BUSINESS
June 30, 2013 | By Richard Verrier
Onyx Pharmaceuticals Inc. on Sunday rejected an unsolicited takeover bid from Amgen Inc., the Thousand Oaks biotech giant. Onyx, headquartered in South San Francisco, confirmed in a statement that it had received a bid of $120 a share from Amgen, but said the offer “significantly undervalued” the company and was “not in the best interest of Onyx or its shareholders. " But Onyx added that it would consider other possible bids. “We are actively exploring the potential to combine Onyx with another company,” Onyx Chief Executive N. Anthony Coles said in the statement.
BUSINESS
January 18, 1992 | From Reuters
A Food and Drug Administration advisory committee said Friday that a new drug to treat kidney cancer patients can have dangerous side effects but should be made available. In clinical tests, interleukin-2 reduced the size of cancerous tumors in 15% of patients, but it also caused severe toxic reactions in most who took it. The treatment was believed to have contributed to the deaths of 4% of the patients. The advisers recommended approval by a vote of 7 to 1. The National Kidney Cancer Assn.
BUSINESS
August 11, 2005 | From Reuters
Pfizer Inc. said it had asked U.S. regulators for permission to sell its experimental pill against cancers of the kidney and stomach, a product it is counting on to help restore earnings growth. Pfizer said it had asked the Food and Drug Administration to approve its Sutent pill to treat gastrointestinal stromal tumors, a type of stomach cancer, and kidney cancer that has spread to other parts of the body and has not been controlled by standard treatments. Shares of Pfizer fell 12 cents to $26.
HEALTH
September 25, 2006 | From Times wire reports
Swedish women who ate fatty fish such as salmon, mackerel and herring at least once a week had a significantly lower risk of kidney cancer compared with consumers of lean fish, a new study has found. The 15-year study found those who regularly ate fish containing lots of fish oil that is rich in omega-3 acids and vitamin D had a 74% lower risk of getting kidney cancer compared with those who ate no fish at all.
NEWS
April 30, 1994 | From Associated Press
A disabled gene that seems to let cells grow uncontrollably, like a car losing its brakes, is responsible for the most common form of kidney cancer, scientists reported Friday. Identification of the gene may lead to earlier detection of kidney cancer and possibly better treatment and prevention, said Dr. W. Marston Linehan of the National Cancer Institute, senior author of the study. The gene is one of a growing class of known "tumor suppressor" genes, which normally act to prevent cancer.
HEALTH
December 22, 2003 | Jane E. Allen
A new procedure could, for the first time, allow doctors to diagnose kidney cancer through a simple urine test. Until now, the only way to know if you had kidney cancer was with imaging tests, such as a CT scan, MRI or ultrasound and, if something suspicious was found, with a biopsy. Researchers at Fox Chase Cancer Center in Philadelphia have found that DNA testing of urine samples not only can accurately detect cancer but also can pick up the disease in its early stages, when it's curable.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 1, 2005 | Claudia Luther, Times Staff Writer
Steve Dunn, who fought back kidney cancer more than a decade ago and used his experience to launch a website to help others find appropriate treatments for the cancer, died Aug. 19 of complications from bacterial meningitis. He was 48. Dunn had been hospitalized with the disease for 10 months and died in a hospice in Denver, said his mother, Nancy Dunn. In August 1989 at age 32, Dunn, a computer programmer and avid outdoorsman, was diagnosed with advanced kidney cancer.
SPORTS
September 26, 2012 | Staff and wire reports
Jamie McCourt, ex-wife of former Dodgers owner Frank McCourt, has filed a motion to set aside the couple's divorce settlement, claiming he committed fraud by vastly understating the team's value. Jamie McCourt's attorney, Bertram Fields, told the Associated Press on Tuesday that she "thought very long and very hard about whether to file this motion" but after other means failed she was forced to return to court over the value of the team that sold for $2 billion in May. "Mr. McCourt got about 93% of the family assets, and Mrs. McCourt got about 7%," Fields said in a phone interview.
NEWS
July 21, 2011 | By Marissa Cevallos, HealthKey / For the Booster Shots blog
One instance in which height doesn't give you the advantage - women high in stature are at greater risk for cancer than their vertically challenged peers. A new study finds that for every 4 inches, a woman's risk of developing cancer increases by 16%. The association between cancer and height isn't new, but the new findings confirm it in a large study and for a wide array of cancers. British researchers assessed data from nearly 1.3 million women enrolled in the Million Women Study; as the women were followed for about nine years, about 97,000 cancers were found.
NATIONAL
April 12, 2011 | By Andrew Zajac, Washington Bureau
Two drugs used against kidney cancer won the endorsement of a federal advisory panel Tuesday to treat a form of pancreatic cancer that strikes several hundred Americans each year. The panel found that the benefits of Novartis Pharmaceuticals' Afinitor and Pfizer's Sutent outweighed their toxic side effects, increasing the likelihood that the Food and Drug Administration would approve their use for pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. The drugs provide significant new treatment options with the potential to extend the lives of patients diagnosed with the tumors.
NEWS
February 10, 2011 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
Two drugs already used to treat kidney cancer doubled survival in a rare form of pancreatic cancer known as neuroendocrine cancer or islet cell tumors, researchers reported Wednesday. The tumors account for only about 1.4% of the 40,000 people who develop pancreatic cancer each year and are generally not as lethal as the adenocarcinomas that represent the bulk of pancreatic cancers. While patients with adenocarcinomas typically die within a year or two, those with neuroendocrine tumors can survive much longer.
SCIENCE
January 6, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Massachusetts scientists have identified a gene linked to the most common type of kidney cancer in children, and expressed hope this might help doctors determine which patients are most at risk of dying. In a report Friday in the journal Science, the team said about 30% of Wilms tumor cases involve mutations in a gene called WTX on the sex-determining X chromosome. About 90% of childhood kidney cancer cases are Wilms tumor, which occurs in one in 10,000 children worldwide.
HEALTH
September 25, 2006 | From Times wire reports
Swedish women who ate fatty fish such as salmon, mackerel and herring at least once a week had a significantly lower risk of kidney cancer compared with consumers of lean fish, a new study has found. The 15-year study found those who regularly ate fish containing lots of fish oil that is rich in omega-3 acids and vitamin D had a 74% lower risk of getting kidney cancer compared with those who ate no fish at all.
BUSINESS
May 6, 1992 | MARTHA GROVES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Tuesday approved the nation's first drug to treat kidney cancer that has spread beyond that organ, a disease that typically claims its victims within a year of diagnosis. The approval of Proleukin--a genetically engineered "orphan drug" developed by biotechnology pioneer Cetus Corp., now part of Chiron Corp.--should buoy the hopes of the nearly 10,000 patients diagnosed each year with kidney cancer.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 1990 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN, TIMES ARTS EDITOR
Lee Remick made an unforgettable film debut as the sexy drum majorette who marries the power-corrupted Andy Griffith in Elia Kazan's "A Face in the Crowd" in 1957. Her lithe, blue-eyed beauty and her disturbing blend of youthful innocence and grown-up sensuality raised the movie's temperature several degrees. She was 22 and, as history was to show, launching an impressive acting career that next saw her as Anthony Franciosa's wife in "The Long Hot Summer," based on some William Faulkner stories.
NATIONAL
March 30, 2006 | Ralph Vartabedian, Times Staff Writer
SAN ANTONIO -- On nearly every block surrounding the former Kelly Air Force Base, small purple crosses sprout from front lawns, marking the homes where cancer has struck. The residents call their neighborhood the "toxic triangle," alleging that the Air Force poisoned it with an industrial solvent, trichloroethylene, or TCE. It was casually dumped at the base for decades and spread for miles through a shallow aquifer under 22,000 nearby houses.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 1, 2005 | Claudia Luther, Times Staff Writer
Steve Dunn, who fought back kidney cancer more than a decade ago and used his experience to launch a website to help others find appropriate treatments for the cancer, died Aug. 19 of complications from bacterial meningitis. He was 48. Dunn had been hospitalized with the disease for 10 months and died in a hospice in Denver, said his mother, Nancy Dunn. In August 1989 at age 32, Dunn, a computer programmer and avid outdoorsman, was diagnosed with advanced kidney cancer.
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