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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 30, 2009 | Dennis McLellan
Dr. William B. Schwartz, a renowned kidney disease specialist and researcher who later turned his attention to health policy and began sounding a warning in the 1980s that rising healthcare costs would force America to begin rationing medical care, has died. He was 86. Schwartz, an emeritus professor of medicine at USC, died March 15 at his home in Los Angeles of Alzheimer's disease, said his wife, Tressa Ruslander Miller.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 9, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Kidney disease affects about 20 million Americans, many of whom end up on dialysis. But there may be a way to identify and treat severe cases earlier in the course of the disease. In a study published Friday, researchers said that measuring a hormone called FGF-23 can predict which patients will end up needing dialysis. The hormone, fibroblast growth factor-23, was discovered fairly recently and has attracted a lot of attention from researchers for its crucial role in regulating phosphorus in the body.
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NEWS
July 15, 1995
Dr. Martin G. Cogan, 46, a UC San Francisco professor of medicine and research physiologist who specialized in kidney diseases. Educated at Stanford and Harvard universities, he earned postgraduate research fellowships at the Veterans Administration Hospital in San Francisco and UC San Francisco. Among his honors was the Young Investigator Award from the American Society of Nephrology and the American Heart Assn.
HEALTH
March 3, 2011 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
A 50-year-old with Type 2 diabetes will lose an average of six years of life as a result of the disease, only one less than would be lost by a long-term smoker of the same age, researchers reported Wednesday. He or she is more than twice as likely to die of cardiovascular disease as someone without diabetes and 25% more likely to die of cancer, according to the report, an international study of more than 820,000 people published in the New England Journal of Medicine. People with Type 2 diabetes are also more likely to die from kidney disease, liver disease, pneumonia, infectious diseases and even intentional self-harm, according to the study, which was conducted by the Emerging Risk Factors Collaboration, based at the University of Cambridge in England.
NEWS
November 11, 1993 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
A commonly used heart drug can halve the risk of death, dialysis or kidney transplants resulting from kidney disease among diabetics, dramatically improving their quality of life and significantly reducing the cost of medical care, researchers reported Wednesday. An estimated 30% of the 14 million diabetic Americans will develop kidney disease, so the new treatment has the potential to significantly alter the treatment of tens of thousands of patients every year, said Dr. Edmund J.
NEWS
January 17, 1991 | JANNY SCOTT, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Long-term users of the banned painkiller phenacetin are 16 times more likely than others to die of urologic or kidney disease, according to a Swiss study that some researchers believe should prompt study of the popular analgesic, acetaminophen. The study, published today in the New England Journal of Medicine, followed more than 1,000 Swiss women over 20 years.
NEWS
July 26, 1990 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II and LINDA ROACH MONROE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
California and Utah researchers have succeeded in preventing one form of kidney disease in rats, potentially opening the door to prevention of kidney failure in humans. The disease, called glomerulonephritis, is one of the most common causes of chronic kidney failure, afflicting as many as 100,000 Americans each year. Once the kidney fails, the patients must either receive a transplant or remain on dialysis for the rest of their lives.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 21, 1994 | THOMAS H. MAUGH III, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
UCLA researchers report that they have opened the door to what may be the first effective treatment for a devastating inherited kidney disease that affects more than 500,000 Americans. Working with mice with a naturally occurring form of the disease, called polycystic kidney disease, the researchers have shown that the anti-cancer drug taxol can halt the growth of the cysts that cause the destruction characteristic of the disease.
NEWS
September 17, 1990 | GARY LIBMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
David Thornton visited 26 doctors before physicians at USC Medical Center diagnosed his rare kidney disease. He was told he might have intestinal cancer, blood clots in his lungs or lupus before USC surgeons removed one kidney and operated on the other. Doctors say patients undergoing that kind of trauma frequently try to forget their disease--or deny it--but Thornton, 24, responded by starting a foundation to raise $2.5 million for kidney research.
BUSINESS
May 23, 1989
International Remote Imaging Systems said it has received a $500,000 grant, with initial funding of $321,334, from the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. The company, a Chatsworth maker of medical equipment, said the grant is to be used to develop a system used to differentiate white blood cells.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 2011 | By Amy Wallen, Special to the Los Angeles Times
What makes the ideal gift this Valentine's Day? Flowers or chocolate? A romantic picnic? How about a kidney? At parties, Angela Balcita tells us in her memoir "Moonface," she and her boyfriend Charlie have a comic routine they tell about how they are joined not at the hip, but at the kidneys. Charlie provided the most unexpected kind of gift ? one of his own kidneys ? to help Balcita, who learned in college that she had glomerulonephritis, a disease that affects how the kidneys filter blood.
HEALTH
June 28, 2010 | By Judy Foreman, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The symptoms of restless legs syndrome sound so bizarre — creepy-crawly feelings and an uncontrollable urge to move the legs, especially at bedtime — that, until recently, many sufferers have simply not been believed. Ron Blum, 38, a Boston e-mail marketer who got RLS as a 7-year-old, recalls that the minute he lay down and tried to sleep, "my left leg felt like it had to go for a walk." Though he never told his parents, he'd get up and walk for hours in circles. It wasn't until years later that a friend heard about RLS. "He called me up and said, 'Ron, I know what you have.
HEALTH
May 25, 2009 | Jill U. Adams
There are plenty of good reasons to take care of your kidneys -- no one really wants to go on dialysis or get a transplant. Poorly functioning kidneys also increase your chances of developing -- and dying from -- cardiovascular disease. Now, a study suggests that even moderate kidney disease increases the risk for men to develop certain cancers. Chronic kidney disease affects 26 million adults in the U.S., and the numbers are on the rise.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 30, 2009 | Dennis McLellan
Dr. William B. Schwartz, a renowned kidney disease specialist and researcher who later turned his attention to health policy and began sounding a warning in the 1980s that rising healthcare costs would force America to begin rationing medical care, has died. He was 86. Schwartz, an emeritus professor of medicine at USC, died March 15 at his home in Los Angeles of Alzheimer's disease, said his wife, Tressa Ruslander Miller.
HEALTH
April 7, 2008 | Marc Siegel, Special to The Times
"Men in Trees, A Tale of Two Kidneys"; ABC; March 26; 10 p.m. The premise: Up in the wilderness of Elmo, Alaska, handyman Cash (played by Scott Elrod) loses consciousness and is rushed to the hospital, where his doctor discovers he has "degenerative kidney disease" and requires dialysis. Calling dialysis a short-term solution, the doctor places Cash on a donor list for kidney transplantation but warns that he could die while waiting for a kidney from a deceased donor.
NEWS
February 3, 2008 | Ridgely Ochs, Newsday
Sunyun Lee's greatest gift to her brother came after her death. Three days after she died unexpectedly from an aneurysm on Jan. 18, a team at a Long Island hospital transplanted both her kidneys into her brother. Now Seung Hoon Lee has a chance at a normal life, doctors said. At a news conference later, a tearful Seung Hoon Lee spoke of his sister through a Korean interpreter. He said that he could feel her spirit within him and that he would "be very careful" to protect it. For the families involved, the dramatic events somehow make emotional sense: Sunyun Lee, a 46-year-old mother of two, was her brother's greatest support after he was diagnosed with a fatal kidney disease in November.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 21, 1997 | J.J. POPE
A Newport Beach businessman has donated $250,000 to support the research of a UC Irvine professor who studies cardiovascular problems in patients with chronic kidney diseases, officials announced Friday. Dr. Nick Vaziri, a professor of medicine and chief of UCI's division of nephrology, has been conducting research on the issue since 1974 and has published more than 300 articles on the subject.
SPORTS
July 22, 1999 | From Associated Press
As the San Antonio Spurs drove toward the NBA championship, Sean Elliott kept a frightening secret: He needed a kidney transplant and might be playing his last games. Doctors said Wednesday that his condition has worsened and the 31-year-old forward hopes to have a transplant as soon as a matching donor is found. "It's a situation that I've known about for a while, so for me it really hasn't been a shock," Elliott said. "Ask me if I'm a little scared, yeah, I'm a little worried."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 15, 2007 | Adrian Uribarri, Times Staff Writer
Her junior year in high school had just begun when Jasmine Bedell's telephone rang with the news she had been waiting for years to hear: A donor kidney had been located. The transplant ended five long years of dialysis treatments. It also ended her dream of attending her senior prom. After the operation, a draining regimen of medications to stop her body from rejecting the new organ forced Bedell to drop out of school.
SCIENCE
March 21, 2006 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Times Staff Writer
An anti-rejection drug widely used in organ transplants could provide the first useful treatment for polycystic kidney disease, a deadly disorder caused by a single defective gene. Studies in mice show that the drug, rapamycin, can reverse the normally unstoppable growth of kidneys associated with the disease. Studies of a small number of humans suggest that it could work in them as well, the team reported Monday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
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