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NEWS
August 2, 2011 | By Karen Kaplan, Los Angeles Times/For the Booster Shots blog
Have food and beverage commercials aimed at kids gotten better since companies like Kellogg's, Nestle, Coca-Colo Co. and McDonald's Corp. pledged to cut back on ads featuring unhealthy fare? It depends on how you define “better,” a new study finds. Food and drink advertising on TV is big business, adding up to about $745 million each year, according to the study published Monday in the Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine. More than half of those dollars are spent trying to reach kids under the age of 12. Those ads work: Other studies have shown that as kids are exposed to a greater number of enticing commercials for sugary drinks, salty snacks and meals cooked in deep fryers, the heavier they get. So a group of researchers from the University of Illinois in Chicago hunkered down with TV ratings data from Nielsen Media Research.
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HOME & GARDEN
May 26, 2012 | By Jill Cargerman, Special to the Los Angeles Times
We're at Cirque du Soleil on the beach, amazed and giggling and holding hands. It's a children's wonderland. We're not children - my husband and I are in our 40s. But we're having the time of our lives, until we recognize a couple we know across the big top … also in their 40s, there with their small children and disapproving looks. We don't have children. We are conspicuously alone, in an altered state, and have been caught falling out of our seats with delight, popcorn spilled in our laps, tears streaming down our cheeks from the sheer joy of it all, not to mention tripping.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 7, 2013 | By Sheri Linden
The split-level house of American dreams and boomer memories probably has never been used so evocatively or been as central to a movie as it is in "The Playroom. " In the 1975-set coming-of-age drama - a kids'-eye view of adult malaise - that house is essentially a character, showcasing the generational disconnect through a cataclysmic night for one family. Directed by Julia Dyer from a script by her late sister, Gretchen Dyer, the film uses the upper-middle-class setting effectively, even as it resorts to heavy-handed symbolism and melodrama in its dour, mostly unforgiving portrait of parental dysfunction.
BUSINESS
August 24, 2012 | By David Lazarus
Simple question: How much of a weekly allowance do you give your kids? According to a survey from the American Institute of CPAs , which presumably knows a thing or two about how we use our money, the average allowance these days is $15. Seriously. Fifteen bucks. And as if that wasn't an eye-opening enough number, the CPAs also say that kids aren't even saving their cash. They tend to spend it as quickly as they receive it. "These findings make clear that it can pay to be a kid," says Jordan Amin, chair of the institute's National CPA Financial Literacy Commission.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 8, 2010 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Witty, urbane and thoroughly entertaining, "The Kids Are All Right" is an ode to the virtues of family, in this case a surprisingly conventional one even with its two moms, two kids and one sperm donor. Whatever your politics, between peerless performances, lyrical direction and an adventurous script, this is the sort of pleasingly grown-up fare all too rare in the mainstream daze of this very dry summer. Before delving into the layered perfection of Annette Bening, Julianne Moore and Mark Ruffalo, let's start by getting past any hesitations or reservations about the lesbian household premise on which "The Kids Are All Right" is based.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 5, 2012 | By Matt Donnelly
The storm rages over Scientology and Tom Cruise, as a Vanity Fair article makes further allegations that the religion and its star frontman alienated Cruise's kids from their adoptive mother, Nicole Kidman. A much-discussed October cover story from the magazine claims that in the wake of Cruise and Kidman's 2001 split, the church held auditions seeking a replacement bride for the "Top Gun" actor, and further more marked his ex Kidman as a detractor. A "suppressive person," as the organization calls it, is an "antisocial" personality with a goal to block the mission of Scientology.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 8, 2010
Artist Nick Cave's colorful "soundsuits" can often elicit childlike wonder in adults, but they're a pretty great time for children too. At this workshop in Cave's craft, kids will trace their bodies in paper and fashion a soundsuit all their own. But when they try to wear it to school for a week straight, don't say you weren't warned. Fowler Museum, UCLA. 1 p.m. Sunday. Free. fowler.ucla.edu.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 3, 2009 | Juliette Funes
At age 6, Danny Rodriguez was waking up at 5 a.m. every weekend with his family to sell flowers at farmers markets throughout Oxnard and help other farmers sell their food. Now 13, he continues to help his field worker parents run the small business, which garners little income because of diminishing sales. "There are days when there's enough, and there are days when there aren't," his mother, Lilia, said. "But we have to keep fighting."
NEWS
October 10, 2013 | By Ted Rall
California has become one of the first states to legally recognize more than two parents per child. But who's in charge?  ALSO: On letters from climate-change deniers Video: Cyclists and drivers can be road pals Olympia Snowe: This is no way to run a country Follow Ted Rall on Twitter @TedRall
NEWS
September 2, 2011 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times / for the Booster Shots blog
Efforts to discourage overuse of antibiotics in kids have been successful -- but not successful enough, researchers at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported Thursday. Their study, which was published in the health agency's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, found that antibiotic prescribing rates for kids 14 and younger who had visited physician offices dropped 24% between 1993-94 and 2007-08, from 300 antibiotic courses to 229 antibiotics courses per 1,000 office visits.  Doctors prescribed antibiotics 26% less often for kids with sore throats, and 19% less often for kids with colds.
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