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ENTERTAINMENT
July 3, 2009 | Juliette Funes
At age 6, Danny Rodriguez was waking up at 5 a.m. every weekend with his family to sell flowers at farmers markets throughout Oxnard and help other farmers sell their food. Now 13, he continues to help his field worker parents run the small business, which garners little income because of diminishing sales. "There are days when there's enough, and there are days when there aren't," his mother, Lilia, said. "But we have to keep fighting."
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NEWS
December 13, 2010 | By Mary Forgione, For the Los Angeles Times
Sugary cereals may not be what kids really crave for breakfast, a new study says. Sounds wrong, doesn’t it? Yet the findings show that kids cut their sugar consumption at breakfast almost in half by eating low-sugar cereals. And what’s more: They liked the low-sugar cereals. The study published in Pediatrics on Monday let 91 students attending summer day camp choose between high-sugar or low-sugar cereals. They also were offered low-fat milk, orange juice, bananas, strawberries and sugar packets as part of their meal.
BUSINESS
June 26, 2013 | By Lisa Boone
A child's impulse to instantly spend a monetary windfall from grandma is understandable. But is it healthy? Even if he or she is just a kid?    Youth financial literacy expert John Lanza says it's important for parents to create good habits now so children don't have to break bad habits later. "Kids get the spend message as early as 2," Lanza said in an email. "Therefore, it's really important that they are exposed to equally powerful messages about sharing [charitable giving]
NEWS
June 25, 2011 | By Judi Dash, Special to the Los Angeles Times
It’s a lap desk, an easel and a carry-all. It’s Crayola’s new Color Wonder Table Top Easel ($19.99) for tots. Unlatch and open the top of the lap desk, and it forms a pyramid with a finger-paint tray on the inside. The finger-paints show up in color only on the included paper, so spills won’t make a mess on other surfaces. The whole package measures 13 by 10 inches. Info: CrayolaStore.com , (866) 896-5445,
NEWS
January 3, 2011 | By Eryn Brown
Abuse of children and adolescents has often been described as a hidden problem.  For a number of reasons -- including fear of retaliation and other consequences among kids themselves, families' wishes to keep their business private and a belief that the authorities just don't care -- violent crimes against children are less likely to be reported than crimes against adults. This remains the case, researchers said Monday in the Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine . But there's good news too: Violent incidents are significantly more likely to get reported today than they were in 1992.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 7, 2013 | By Sheri Linden
The split-level house of American dreams and boomer memories probably has never been used so evocatively or been as central to a movie as it is in "The Playroom. " In the 1975-set coming-of-age drama - a kids'-eye view of adult malaise - that house is essentially a character, showcasing the generational disconnect through a cataclysmic night for one family. Directed by Julia Dyer from a script by her late sister, Gretchen Dyer, the film uses the upper-middle-class setting effectively, even as it resorts to heavy-handed symbolism and melodrama in its dour, mostly unforgiving portrait of parental dysfunction.
HOME & GARDEN
May 26, 2012 | By Jill Cargerman, Special to the Los Angeles Times
We're at Cirque du Soleil on the beach, amazed and giggling and holding hands. It's a children's wonderland. We're not children - my husband and I are in our 40s. But we're having the time of our lives, until we recognize a couple we know across the big top … also in their 40s, there with their small children and disapproving looks. We don't have children. We are conspicuously alone, in an altered state, and have been caught falling out of our seats with delight, popcorn spilled in our laps, tears streaming down our cheeks from the sheer joy of it all, not to mention tripping.
NEWS
December 24, 2010 | By Mary Forgione, For the Los Angeles Times
Here's a holiday classic likely going on in your house right now: Johnny is misbehaving, Mommy is having none of it, Mommy tells Johnny that she's going to tell Santa on him right now . Jen Weigel of the Chicago Tribune writes in this story how it recently played out for her: "Getting my son to be motivated for school in the morning is always a challenge. (He's only 4, so I cringe at my future.) But the other morning, he gave me so much trouble that I did what any mother would do when pressed for time and patience: I played the Santa card.
SCIENCE
July 15, 2013 | By Eryn Brown
If you have a little kid, you know the drill. Your child develops a nasty fever, but no one's really sure what's making him sick. Most likely, he has a virus that will run its course. He may have a scary bacterial infection that requires treatment, but results of tests to confirm this won't come back for a day or so.  So to be safe, your pediatrician prescribes antibiotics -- even though they won't help fight a virus and even though overuse of antibiotic drugs has led to the evolution of drug-resistant superbugs.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 8, 2010 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Witty, urbane and thoroughly entertaining, "The Kids Are All Right" is an ode to the virtues of family, in this case a surprisingly conventional one even with its two moms, two kids and one sperm donor. Whatever your politics, between peerless performances, lyrical direction and an adventurous script, this is the sort of pleasingly grown-up fare all too rare in the mainstream daze of this very dry summer. Before delving into the layered perfection of Annette Bening, Julianne Moore and Mark Ruffalo, let's start by getting past any hesitations or reservations about the lesbian household premise on which "The Kids Are All Right" is based.
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