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December 24, 2010 | By Mary Forgione, For the Los Angeles Times
Here's a holiday classic likely going on in your house right now: Johnny is misbehaving, Mommy is having none of it, Mommy tells Johnny that she's going to tell Santa on him right now . Jen Weigel of the Chicago Tribune writes in this story how it recently played out for her: "Getting my son to be motivated for school in the morning is always a challenge. (He's only 4, so I cringe at my future.) But the other morning, he gave me so much trouble that I did what any mother would do when pressed for time and patience: I played the Santa card.
April 29, 2001
Re "60 Pills Divided by 6 Youths Equals a Trip to the Hospital," April 22. People say that kids do that sort of thing because they don't know the side effects, but to tell you the truth, it's because they just want to take them and see what happens. It's curiosity not stupidity that drives kids to take drugs in the first place. . . . Medication of that sort should not be sold to minors for their own safety. Kids like these make other kids look stupid and inexperienced. These kind of actions are what scares parents into not letting the responsible kids have fun. HANNAH YANKELEVICH Granada Hills
September 2, 1995
In a recent film review, Kenneth Turan expresses his regrets for not being able to save us from "Kids," the film (" 'Kids': Grossing Out the Old Squares," Calendar, July 28). Turan wants to save us not only from seeing our own tragic social realities, but also from facing the complexities of our own individual existence, which he does not seem to be able to understand any better than the kids he likes to reject. The purity of kids like those in "Kids" is to be seen only by those who actually still have it deep in their own hearts.
December 15, 1996
Re "Woodworkers Donate 100 Handmade Toys," Dec. 10. Just wanted to say thanks for the story on the Winnetka woodworkers and their cool bulldozers. They didn't just make Christmas brighter for kids, they made it brighter for me! It's cheery just to think about those well-made little trucks and the kids who will invent games with them for years to come. CYNTHIA WISEHART Burbank
January 31, 1997
The irony is stunning. Taxpayers just put $373 million into building a new jailhouse, the Twin Towers, while at Charles Maclay Middle School in Pacoima, "you could have seen it raining inside the classroom," according to Assistant Principal Dan Rodriguez (Jan. 25). Why do we wait until kids become inmates to invest in them? AMY ALKON Venice
October 27, 2009 | Matea Gold
More than an entire day -- that's how long children sit in front of the television in an average week, according to new findings released Monday by Nielsen. The amount of television usage by children reached an eight-year high, with kids ages 2 to 5 watching the screen for more than 32 hours a week on average and those ages 6 to 11 watching more than 28 hours. The analysis, based on the fourth quarter of 2008, measured children's consumption of live and recorded TV, as well as VCR and game console usage.
January 31, 1999
Regarding "Screaming Babies on Board" (Taking the Kids, Dec. 20): Nothing in the U.S. is free. The writer neglected to mention that "Delta's just-for-kids" frequent-flier club had a sign-up charge. [Editor's note: The club is no longer accepting new enrollments.] The best airline to travel with a child? British Airways. When flying LAX to London's Heathrow or Gatwick airports, there are buggies that can be booked to meet the family so that parents can wheel their kids through the checkout procedure; a professionally run child center in Heathrow; bulkhead seats fitted with a bassinet shelf; and planes equipped with a changing station in the restroom.
July 8, 2010 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Witty, urbane and thoroughly entertaining, "The Kids Are All Right" is an ode to the virtues of family, in this case a surprisingly conventional one even with its two moms, two kids and one sperm donor. Whatever your politics, between peerless performances, lyrical direction and an adventurous script, this is the sort of pleasingly grown-up fare all too rare in the mainstream daze of this very dry summer. Before delving into the layered perfection of Annette Bening, Julianne Moore and Mark Ruffalo, let's start by getting past any hesitations or reservations about the lesbian household premise on which "The Kids Are All Right" is based.
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