Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsKids
IN THE NEWS

Kids

NEWS
January 3, 2011 | By Eryn Brown
Abuse of children and adolescents has often been described as a hidden problem.  For a number of reasons -- including fear of retaliation and other consequences among kids themselves, families' wishes to keep their business private and a belief that the authorities just don't care -- violent crimes against children are less likely to be reported than crimes against adults. This remains the case, researchers said Monday in the Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine . But there's good news too: Violent incidents are significantly more likely to get reported today than they were in 1992.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
July 8, 2010 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Witty, urbane and thoroughly entertaining, "The Kids Are All Right" is an ode to the virtues of family, in this case a surprisingly conventional one even with its two moms, two kids and one sperm donor. Whatever your politics, between peerless performances, lyrical direction and an adventurous script, this is the sort of pleasingly grown-up fare all too rare in the mainstream daze of this very dry summer. Before delving into the layered perfection of Annette Bening, Julianne Moore and Mark Ruffalo, let's start by getting past any hesitations or reservations about the lesbian household premise on which "The Kids Are All Right" is based.
BUSINESS
August 24, 2012 | By David Lazarus
Simple question: How much of a weekly allowance do you give your kids? According to a survey from the American Institute of CPAs , which presumably knows a thing or two about how we use our money, the average allowance these days is $15. Seriously. Fifteen bucks. And as if that wasn't an eye-opening enough number, the CPAs also say that kids aren't even saving their cash. They tend to spend it as quickly as they receive it. "These findings make clear that it can pay to be a kid," says Jordan Amin, chair of the institute's National CPA Financial Literacy Commission.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 23, 2009
Dear Amy: I recently got divorced. We have two girls, ages 6 and 9. We're great parents and get along well. My older daughter has blamed my ex for making her daddy leave. She's out of control and doesn't mind her mother well. For a while after we broke up, I was going to the house and sleeping over as friends. The kids saw us hug and kiss and said, "You guys look so good together!" and "Give daddy a kiss, Mommy!" Now my ex is seeing someone. She told me they've decided to move in together -- with the kids.
NEWS
December 24, 2010 | By Mary Forgione, For the Los Angeles Times
Here's a holiday classic likely going on in your house right now: Johnny is misbehaving, Mommy is having none of it, Mommy tells Johnny that she's going to tell Santa on him right now . Jen Weigel of the Chicago Tribune writes in this story how it recently played out for her: "Getting my son to be motivated for school in the morning is always a challenge. (He's only 4, so I cringe at my future.) But the other morning, he gave me so much trouble that I did what any mother would do when pressed for time and patience: I played the Santa card.
TRAVEL
May 20, 2007 | By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
Amsterdam When considering Amsterdam, its famous red-light district and the coffee shops where cannabis is smoked, you may assume it's less than an ideal city to visit with young children. But you would be wrong. On a visit here last summer with Danny, 8, and Fiona, 6, we had a few, um, educational moments. Fiona wanted to know why all the women in the windows looked "like they were getting ready for a party. " (I guess because they were wearing lipstick and underwear and that's all.)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 29, 2001
Re "60 Pills Divided by 6 Youths Equals a Trip to the Hospital," April 22. People say that kids do that sort of thing because they don't know the side effects, but to tell you the truth, it's because they just want to take them and see what happens. It's curiosity not stupidity that drives kids to take drugs in the first place. . . . Medication of that sort should not be sold to minors for their own safety. Kids like these make other kids look stupid and inexperienced. These kind of actions are what scares parents into not letting the responsible kids have fun. HANNAH YANKELEVICH Granada Hills
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 2, 2011 | Sandy Banks
As if parents don't have enough to worry about, with cyber-bullying and online perverts, now the nation's pediatricians are adding "Facebook depression" to the list of maladies stalking our kids. According to a report released this week by the American Academy of Pediatrics, doctors may add a new trio of cringe-inducing questions to their screening checklist for teenage patients: "Are you on Facebook? How many friends do you have? And how does that make you feel?" Apparently, kids with poor self-esteem can be pitched into depression by the perception that everyone on Facebook is having more fun that they are. They become obsessed with others' status updates and friend tallies.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 2, 1995
In a recent film review, Kenneth Turan expresses his regrets for not being able to save us from "Kids," the film (" 'Kids': Grossing Out the Old Squares," Calendar, July 28). Turan wants to save us not only from seeing our own tragic social realities, but also from facing the complexities of our own individual existence, which he does not seem to be able to understand any better than the kids he likes to reject. The purity of kids like those in "Kids" is to be seen only by those who actually still have it deep in their own hearts.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|