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Kiichi Miyazawa

BUSINESS
October 28, 1988 | From Reuters
Japanese Finance Minister Kiichi Miyazawa, his political future at stake, defended himself on Thursday against charges that he was directly involved in an insider trading scandal that has rocked the government. During an unusual 10-minute parliamentary session in which only he spoke, Miyazawa denied that he was directly involved and blamed his secretary.
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NEWS
March 30, 1992 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hard-luck Prime Minister Kiichi Miyazawa got his first break in five months in office Sunday as two ruling Liberal Democratic Party members swept a by-election for the lower house of Parliament. Tamisuke Watanuki, secretary general of the party, said he hoped the double victory would provide "a chance to start a new flow" favoring the conservative Liberal Democrats.
NEWS
January 1, 1992 | From Associated Press
Prime Minister Kiichi Miyazawa issued a New Year's plea for Japanese auto makers to ease trade tensions with the United States by helping Americans sell cars in Japan. "I am asking industry leaders to take more seriously and compassionately the U.S. situation, epitomized by General Motors Corp.'s shutdowns," Miyazawa said in a news conference televised today. GM announced last month that it will eliminate 74,000 jobs and close 21 plants in North America over the next four years.
NEWS
October 7, 1991 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former Foreign Minister Kiichi Miyazawa on Sunday appeared to win an endorsement giving him an edge over two rivals in a bid to succeed outgoing Prime Minister Toshiki Kaifu. Shin Kanemaru, 77, a kingmaker of the ruling Liberal Democratic Party, told supporters that the party's largest faction, of which he is the titular head, should get behind a candidate who is well versed in foreign affairs.
BUSINESS
June 23, 1992 | LESLIE HELM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As Tokyo stock prices continued a perilous slide, Japan's Prime Minister Kiichi Miyazawa on Monday promised to present a package of pump-priming measures to help revive the economy. Although ruling party officials insist that the proposed measures are unrelated to the stock market's decline, the announcement came as the market's Nikkei average plummeted 598.65 points to close Monday at 15,921.22, the first time the index had fallen below 16,000 since Oct. 22, 1986.
NEWS
February 8, 1992 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Japan and the United States served notice Friday that they are shelving a planned visit here this spring by Prime Minister Kiichi Miyazawa, amid indications that the political climates may be too tense in both countries for another high-profile session between Miyazawa and President Bush.
NEWS
June 17, 1993 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A rebel faction of the ruling Liberal Democratic Party declared Wednesday that it will side with the opposition to pass a no-confidence motion against Prime Minister Kiichi Miyazawa, an act that could precipitate a general election. Six opposition groups, led by the Socialists, submitted the motion this morning, NHK television reported. A vote could come Friday, at the earliest.
NEWS
April 15, 1993 | LESLIE HELM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When President Clinton and his crew meet with Japanese Prime Minister Kiichi Miyazawa and his entourage Friday to talk tough on trade, they could find themselves outgunned by better-equipped Japanese negotiators. Start at the top. Clinton's experience with Japan is limited to three short trips he made as governor of Arkansas to attract Japanese investment.
NEWS
July 22, 1993 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a speech that lasted only two minutes and drew no applause, Prime Minister Kiichi Miyazawa today told ruling Liberal Democratic Party legislators of both houses of Parliament that he intends to resign as party president to assume responsibility for the party's first-ever defeat in a lower house election. The long-awaited announcement came three days after Miyazawa indicated he would try to retain the party post, a move that stirred an explosion of protest.
NEWS
November 7, 1991 | LESLIE HELM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At his first press conference as Japanese prime minister, Kiichi Miyazawa spent nearly an hour and a half Wednesday discussing everything from economics and foreign policy to morality with a spontaneity and frankness that won accolades from political observers. Miyazawa raised serious questions, for example, about the role that human rights issues should play in foreign policy.
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