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Kilauea Volcano

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NEWS
March 7, 2011 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times Daily Travel & Deal blogger
Kilauea volcano 's eruption Sunday means the spectacular lava show continues on Hawaii's Big Island . The volcano, which has been erupting since the early 1980s, spewed lava 65 feet into the air after the Puu Oo Crater collapsed this weekend, media reports said.  Hawaii Volcanoes National Park in a recorded message reports that as of Monday, steam, sulphur oxide and other volcanic gases continue to erupt from the summit. The park has closed Chain of Craters Road, all coastal trails in what's called the east rift zone and the Kulanaokuaiki Campground as a result.
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SCIENCE
March 18, 2011 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times
The Shinmoedake volcano on Japan's southern island of Kyushu, 950 miles from the epicenter of last week's magnitude 9 earthquake, spewed ash and rocks up to 2.5 miles into the air March 13. The volcano had erupted Jan. 19 and several times afterward, most recently Feb. 1. Its re-eruption just two days after the massive temblor prompted many to wonder whether the quake could have triggered that event. "The last explosion event at Shinmoedake may be triggered by the shock of the earthquake," said Setsuya Nakada of the Earthquake Research Institute at the University of Tokyo in an e-mail.
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NEWS
January 3, 1986 | Associated Press
A 13-hour eruption of Kilauea Volcano ended early Thursday on the eve of its third anniversary of activity. Kilauea has been sporadically erupting since Jan. 3, 1983. The newest outbreak began Wednesday afternoon.
NEWS
March 7, 2011 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times Daily Travel & Deal blogger
Kilauea volcano 's eruption Sunday means the spectacular lava show continues on Hawaii's Big Island . The volcano, which has been erupting since the early 1980s, spewed lava 65 feet into the air after the Puu Oo Crater collapsed this weekend, media reports said.  Hawaii Volcanoes National Park in a recorded message reports that as of Monday, steam, sulphur oxide and other volcanic gases continue to erupt from the summit. The park has closed Chain of Craters Road, all coastal trails in what's called the east rift zone and the Kulanaokuaiki Campground as a result.
NATIONAL
August 23, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
Lava from Kilauea Volcano on the Big Island cascaded into the ocean at three points as thousands of visitors trekked to witness the latest display. The current breakout of lava began May 12, and reached the sea July 19. On Thursday morning, the lava finished covering the remaining isolated segment of Chain of Craters Road at an area known as Highcastle--a popular viewing spot in the early 1990s.
NATIONAL
March 30, 2005 | From Associated Press
About three times the average volume of lava from Kilauea volcano is flowing into the ocean at five separate entry points, officials at Hawaii Volcanoes National Park said Tuesday. The increased activity is a result of magma which began inflating Kilauea in January, said Jim Gale, a park ranger. "With the current inflation episode stalled, lava is being pushed out the Pu'u O'o vent and into the ocean," he said.
TRAVEL
July 21, 2002 | Michele Kayal, Jane Engle
If you've never seen magma--and even if you have--there has rarely been a better view than the current one at Hawaii Volcanoes National Park. The lava flow at the park's Kilauea Volcano, which has been erupting since 1983 on the southeast side of the Big Island, has become more accessible to visitors in the last few weeks than it has been in seven years, rangers and geologists say. A short hike from a park road puts you within a few feet of molten rock.
NEWS
November 5, 1986 | United Press International
Kilauea volcano oozed more lava down its southeast flank Tuesday, prompting authorities to issue a preliminary fire-danger warning to residents of a sparsely populated subdivision in its path.
NEWS
July 27, 1985 | United Press International
The Kilauea volcano spewed molten rock 1,000 feet into the air before dawn Friday, beginning the 35th phase of its 2 1/2-year-long eruption.
NEWS
January 20, 1987 | United Press International
Dallas L. Peck of the U.S. Geological Survey has calculated that the lava spewed by Kilauea volcano since it began its eruption four years ago would be enough to cover Washington, D.C., to a depth of 12 feet.
NATIONAL
June 7, 2009 | Associated Press
The summit of Hawaii's Kilauea volcano is glowing brightly as molten lava swirls 300 feet below its crater's floor, bubbling near the surface after years of spewing from the volcano's side. The expanding vent of Halemaumau crater helps confirm scientists' belief that the lava is close to the surface of the summit, said Janet Babb, a geologist and spokeswoman for the U.S. Geological Survey's Hawaiian Volcano Observatory.
NATIONAL
April 11, 2008 | From the Associated Press
A wind shift led officials to reopen Hawaii Volcanoes National Park on Thursday, two days after it was closed because of sulfur dioxide pouring from the erupting Kilauea volcano. Jim Kauahikaua at the U.S. Geological Survey's Hawaiian Volcano Observatory said noxious gas continued to rise from Halemaumau Crater, where an explosion Wednesday night blasted rocks 230 feet into the air.
NATIONAL
March 30, 2005 | From Associated Press
About three times the average volume of lava from Kilauea volcano is flowing into the ocean at five separate entry points, officials at Hawaii Volcanoes National Park said Tuesday. The increased activity is a result of magma which began inflating Kilauea in January, said Jim Gale, a park ranger. "With the current inflation episode stalled, lava is being pushed out the Pu'u O'o vent and into the ocean," he said.
NEWS
June 8, 2004
Waterfalls of lava cascade over cliffs and disappear under fume clouds, then burble into the ocean at Hawaii's Volcanoes National Park. Since early May, more than 1,200 gawkers have been trekking daily to see the latest scene in the molten drama, which began in 1983. Kilauea Volcano continuously spits lava, but the flow is rarely this accessible and visually stunning. "It's really dynamic, changing constantly day to day," says park spokeswoman Norrie Judd.
NATIONAL
August 23, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
Lava from Kilauea Volcano on the Big Island cascaded into the ocean at three points as thousands of visitors trekked to witness the latest display. The current breakout of lava began May 12, and reached the sea July 19. On Thursday morning, the lava finished covering the remaining isolated segment of Chain of Craters Road at an area known as Highcastle--a popular viewing spot in the early 1990s.
TRAVEL
August 18, 2002 | VANI RANGACHAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was almost like a twilight picnic before a rock concert. People milled about carrying backpacks, coolers and baskets. Flashlight beams swung in arcs across the path. Shouts, cheers and chatter added to the carnival-like atmosphere. A young woman pulled a marshmallow from her knapsack, skewered it with a stick and thrust it toward the orange glow.
NEWS
December 6, 1985 | United Press International
Kilauea volcano, which has spurted fountains of flaming lava periodically over the last three years, is swelling and headed for another eruption, George Ulrich, a U.S. Geological Survey scientist, said Thursday. Molten rock was reported within 20 feet of the top of a vent on the mountain.
NEWS
October 14, 1991 | Associated Press
A hiker at the summit of Kilauea Volcano fell to his death into the crater, an official said. The victim, a 23-year-old sailor, was hiking after dark with three other Navy men Saturday when he walked over the rim and fell about halfway down the 400-foot slope. The crater doesn't contain lava.
NATIONAL
July 28, 2002 | From Associated Press
Glowing lava set trees afire and oozed into the ocean before dawn Saturday as thousands of spectators braved Kilauea Volcano's scalding spray to witness the spectacle. It is considered the most dangerous display of volcanic activity from Kilauea since 1995. Since the flow began May 12, the lava has triggered one major fire, which burned more than 3,600 acres.
TRAVEL
July 21, 2002 | Michele Kayal, Jane Engle
If you've never seen magma--and even if you have--there has rarely been a better view than the current one at Hawaii Volcanoes National Park. The lava flow at the park's Kilauea Volcano, which has been erupting since 1983 on the southeast side of the Big Island, has become more accessible to visitors in the last few weeks than it has been in seven years, rangers and geologists say. A short hike from a park road puts you within a few feet of molten rock.
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