Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsKim Cranston
IN THE NEWS

Kim Cranston

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
April 23, 1992 | SARA FRITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Attorneys for the Federal Election Commission are preparing to allow Sen. Alan Cranston (D-Calif.) to use funds from his political action committee to pay legal costs incurred by his son during an investigation of the so-called "Keating Five" scandal. In a draft advisory opinion, FEC attorneys have proposed granting Cranston's request to reimburse lawyers for his son, Kim, with funds from the Committee for a Democratic Consensus, a PAC operated by the senator.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
January 1, 2001 | From a Times Staff Writer
Alan Cranston, the California Democrat and fierce crusader for nuclear arms control whose 24-year career in the U.S. Senate ended in 1993 under the cloud of the Keating savings and loan scandal, died Sunday at his home in Los Altos Hills. He was 86. He was found slumped over a sink at the family compound in the Bay Area community by his son, Kim. The cause of death was not immediately known. Although the former senator had been feeling ill the last few days, "he had been in good health.
Advertisement
NEWS
December 23, 1988
Lt. Gov. Leo T. McCarthy announced the appointment of Kim Cranston, 38, a Los Angeles attorney and son of U.S. Sen. Alan Cranston, as his new chief of staff, succeeding Alan Katz, who will return to an insurance marketing company. Cranston will be paid $70,000 a year and will be based in Los Angeles. He was chairman of his father's reelection campaign two years ago and headed up the California Democratic Party's get-out-the-vote drive this year.
NEWS
July 27, 1996 | KENNETH R. WEISS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Alan Cranston's large bony hand picks up a stainless steel fork and holds it upright on the table. "Here's the missile," he says. "And here's the nuclear warhead," he adds, balancing a salt shaker on top of the fork. He pulls the tower apart and sets the pieces down. "We have to separate them so it takes 24 hours to put them together," he explains. "That will give us time to talk and resolve any conflict peacefully."
NEWS
March 25, 1992 | SARA FRITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sen. Alan Cranston (D-Calif.) has asked the Federal Election Commission for permission to use funds from his political action committee to pay legal costs incurred by his son during an investigation of the so-called Keating Five scandal. In a letter to the FEC dated March 2, Bruce H. Turnbull, a lawyer representing Cranston, said the senator wants to reimburse lawyers for his son, Kim, with funds from the Committee for a Democratic Consensus, a PAC operated by the California Democrat.
NEWS
July 18, 1989 | JAMES S. GRANELLI, Times Staff Writer
Sen. Alan Cranston, already under fire for aiding Phoenix businessman Charles H. Keating in his battles with savings and loan regulators, said Monday that he solicited a $400,000 donation from Keating for a voter registration group formed by the senator's son. The California Democrat said he also asked Keating in 1987 and 1988 to donate a total of $450,000 to two other nonprofit, nonpartisan voter registration groups "because of my determination to do what I can to increase voter participation."
NEWS
December 7, 1989 | PAUL HOUSTON and ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Internal Revenue Service is investigating whether voter registration groups that received millions of dollars solicited by Sen. Alan Cranston (D-Calif.) violated their tax-exempt status by engaging in partisan activity, law enforcement sources said Wednesday. IRS auditors in Los Angeles are looking into allegations that the ostensibly nonpartisan groups placed undue emphasis on registering more Democrats than Republicans.
NEWS
October 22, 1989
It is the inescapable spiral of modern political campaigns: Costs mount, rules grow tighter on fund raising and spending, politicians develop ever more ingenious ways to skirt restrictions. And, when it comes to ingenious fund-raising devices, Democratic Sen. Alan Cranston of California is in the vanguard.
NEWS
January 1, 2001 | From a Times Staff Writer
Alan Cranston, the California Democrat and fierce crusader for nuclear arms control whose 24-year career in the U.S. Senate ended in 1993 under the cloud of the Keating savings and loan scandal, died Sunday at his home in Los Altos Hills. He was 86. He was found slumped over a sink at the family compound in the Bay Area community by his son, Kim. The cause of death was not immediately known. Although the former senator had been feeling ill the last few days, "he had been in good health.
NEWS
October 14, 1989 | SARA FRITZ, SARA FRITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Common Cause called Friday for investigations of Sen. Alan Cranston (D-Calif.) and four other senators on charges that they improperly interfered with a federal investigation of troubled Lincoln Savings & Loan in Irvine after receiving big contributions from its owner. The influential citizens lobby asked the Senate Ethics Committee and the Justice Department to look into the actions of the five senators on behalf of Charles H. Keating Jr.
NEWS
April 23, 1992 | SARA FRITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Attorneys for the Federal Election Commission are preparing to allow Sen. Alan Cranston (D-Calif.) to use funds from his political action committee to pay legal costs incurred by his son during an investigation of the so-called "Keating Five" scandal. In a draft advisory opinion, FEC attorneys have proposed granting Cranston's request to reimburse lawyers for his son, Kim, with funds from the Committee for a Democratic Consensus, a PAC operated by the senator.
NEWS
March 25, 1992 | SARA FRITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sen. Alan Cranston (D-Calif.) has asked the Federal Election Commission for permission to use funds from his political action committee to pay legal costs incurred by his son during an investigation of the so-called Keating Five scandal. In a letter to the FEC dated March 2, Bruce H. Turnbull, a lawyer representing Cranston, said the senator wants to reimburse lawyers for his son, Kim, with funds from the Committee for a Democratic Consensus, a PAC operated by the California Democrat.
NEWS
December 10, 1990 | SARA FRITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sen. Alan Cranston (D-Calif.) played a more active and independent role than any of the other so-called Keating Five senators in assisting the former owner of Lincoln Savings & Loan, according to evidence gathered by the Senate Ethics Committee.
NEWS
January 4, 1990 | CHARLES R. BABCOCK, THE WASHINGTON POST
Officials of the Southwest Voter Registration Education Project of San Antonio were surprised to learn last year about the relationship between Sen. Alan Cranston (D-Calif.) and controversial Arizona savings and loan executive Charles H. Keating Jr. SVREP leaders say that Cranston broke a promise to help them raise $250,000 to pay for the group's 1986 campaign to register Mexican Americans in California to vote, when Cranston was running for reelection.
NEWS
December 7, 1989 | PAUL HOUSTON and ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Internal Revenue Service is investigating whether voter registration groups that received millions of dollars solicited by Sen. Alan Cranston (D-Calif.) violated their tax-exempt status by engaging in partisan activity, law enforcement sources said Wednesday. IRS auditors in Los Angeles are looking into allegations that the ostensibly nonpartisan groups placed undue emphasis on registering more Democrats than Republicans.
NEWS
October 22, 1989
It is the inescapable spiral of modern political campaigns: Costs mount, rules grow tighter on fund raising and spending, politicians develop ever more ingenious ways to skirt restrictions. And, when it comes to ingenious fund-raising devices, Democratic Sen. Alan Cranston of California is in the vanguard.
NEWS
December 10, 1990 | SARA FRITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sen. Alan Cranston (D-Calif.) played a more active and independent role than any of the other so-called Keating Five senators in assisting the former owner of Lincoln Savings & Loan, according to evidence gathered by the Senate Ethics Committee.
NEWS
July 27, 1996 | KENNETH R. WEISS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Alan Cranston's large bony hand picks up a stainless steel fork and holds it upright on the table. "Here's the missile," he says. "And here's the nuclear warhead," he adds, balancing a salt shaker on top of the fork. He pulls the tower apart and sets the pieces down. "We have to separate them so it takes 24 hours to put them together," he explains. "That will give us time to talk and resolve any conflict peacefully."
NEWS
October 14, 1989 | SARA FRITZ, SARA FRITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Common Cause called Friday for investigations of Sen. Alan Cranston (D-Calif.) and four other senators on charges that they improperly interfered with a federal investigation of troubled Lincoln Savings & Loan in Irvine after receiving big contributions from its owner. The influential citizens lobby asked the Senate Ethics Committee and the Justice Department to look into the actions of the five senators on behalf of Charles H. Keating Jr.
NEWS
August 12, 1989
Your staff writer Mark Fineman was correct when he wrote that Sri Lanka's devastating counterinsurgency in the south has been fueled in part by India's military presence in the north ("Society Crumbling Amid Fear and Bloodshed in Sir Lanka," Part I, July 27). But what he has failed to point out it that the majority of all ethnic sections in the country are now demanding that the Indian peacekeeping forces should go.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|