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Kim Dae Jung

NEWS
March 8, 2001 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush told South Korean President Kim Dae Jung on Wednesday that he is skeptical about North Korea's commitment to current and future arms deals and said he won't soon reopen negotiations with the Communist regime in Pyongyang to curb its long-range missile program.
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NEWS
March 7, 2001 | MARK MAGNIER and ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
On the face of it, there are a number of reasons why today's summit in Washington between President Bush and South Korean President Kim Dae Jung should have its share of awkward moments. For one thing, the Bush administration has signaled that Kim's "sunshine policy" of engagement with North Korea is too soft on the North and doesn't demand enough in return.
NEWS
December 11, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
South Korean President Kim Dae Jung, accepting his Nobel Peace Prize in Oslo, promised to devote the rest of his life to peace, democracy and reconciliation with North Korea. The prize was given to Kim, 76, for his lifetime of work for democracy and human rights and for his efforts to reconcile the two Koreas, which have been uneasy neighbors since the 1950-53 Korean War. His achievements included a summit with North Korean leader Kim Jong Il in June.
NEWS
October 15, 2000 | MARK MAGNIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Leaders throughout history have used war to distract their domestic critics. South Korean President Kim Dae Jung may find himself hoping that his Nobel Peace Prize can have the same effect. Kim has come under his share of brickbats in recent months in both the political and the economic arenas.
NEWS
August 7, 2000 | From Associated Press
President Kim Dae Jung replaced eight of the 19 members of his Cabinet today, naming a new finance minister to allay criticism that the pace of his economic reform program has been sluggish. Kim retained Prime Minister Lee Han Dong in his largely ceremonial post in the reshuffle. Most of the ministers affected held economic posts and were responsible for implementing reforms drawn up more than 2 1/2 years ago during Asia's currency crisis.
NEWS
July 19, 2000 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
North and South Korean officials will meet later this month to discuss establishment of a military hotline and the first exchanges between the two nations' armed forces, South Korean President Kim Dae Jung revealed Tuesday. In a far-ranging interview, Kim predicted that North Korea will inevitably be forced to open up its isolated economy but said reunification of the two Koreas could take 20 to 30 years.
NEWS
June 17, 2000 | SONNI EFRON and MARK MAGNIER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
North Korean leader Kim Jong Il has agreed to invite Pope John Paul II to visit North Korea, South Korean President Kim Dae Jung told his Cabinet on Friday. Coming a day after the Southern leader returned from a historic summit in the North Korean capital, Pyongyang, the announcement kept South Koreans debating whether Kim Jong Il's new openness is a propaganda ploy to extract aid or represents a tectonic policy shift by his hermetic, hard-line regime.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 16, 2000
Athaw may finally be setting in along the last frozen frontier of the Cold War. This week's unprecedented meeting between the leaders of North and South Korea reaffirmed the two countries' shared aspiration for national reunification, 55 years after Korea was liberated from brutal Japanese occupation but left geographically and ideologically divided. No one expects to see a unitary Korea for many years or even decades.
NEWS
June 16, 2000 | MARK MAGNIER and SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
South Korean President Kim Dae Jung was greeted by cheering crowds and soaring balloons when he returned home Thursday bearing a major agreement with North Korea. But even before his plane landed, his countrymen were adding up the summit score.
NEWS
June 15, 2000 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For U.S. advocates of a robust national missile defense system, the images emanating from the historic Korean summit spell trouble. Photos and TV footage from the summit show a smiling, relaxed North Korean leader, Kim Jong Il, hosting his South Korean counterpart, Kim Dae Jung. More important, they depict the reclusive Communist ruler acting in an apparently rational manner.
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