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Kim Il Sung

NEWS
July 20, 1994 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hundreds of thousands of North Koreans assembled solemnly in Pyongyang today to pledge loyalty to Kim Jong Il, son of late North Korean dictator Kim Il Sung, a day after a tear-filled funeral for the only leader in the Stalinist state's 46-year history.
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NEWS
July 19, 1994 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A day before North Korea bade farewell to the cult hero who enjoyed god-like status ruling the Stalinist nation throughout its 46-year history, South Korea on Monday condemned the late President Kim Il Sung as instigator of the 1950-53 Korean War and perpetrator of national division. South Korean Prime Minister Lee Yung Duk made the statement after meeting with his Cabinet.
NEWS
July 16, 1994 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a move that astonished and puzzled South Korean leaders, North Korea today abruptly postponed a state funeral for President Kim Il Sung from Sunday to Tuesday. Radio Pyongyang, monitored here, said the decision was made to cope with an increasing number of North Korean mourners who wish to pay their respects to the only leader the Stalinist nation ever knew in its 46-year history. Kim, 82, died of a heart attack July 8.
NEWS
July 15, 1994 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
South Korea on Thursday banned visits by its citizens to attend the funeral of North Korean leader Kim Il Sung, while North Korea announced it would welcome such visits and revealed that a prominent South Korean already had arrived in Pyongyang. Bo Hi Pak, a close assistant to the Rev. Sun Myung Moon, founder of the Unification Church, was shown on North Korean television arriving at Pyongyang airport Wednesday.
NEWS
July 14, 1994 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The mere idea that South Korean President Kim Young Sam might express condolences to North Korea on the death of leader Kim Il Sung--as President Clinton and Japanese Prime Minister Tomiichi Murayama did--sent shock waves through mainstream society here. On Wednesday, the National Assembly members who made the suggestion apologized, one after another, while the opposition Democratic Party disavowed itself from the proposals for the fourth time.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 14, 1994 | JONATHAN D. POLLACK, Jonathan D. Pollack is senior adviser for international policy at RAND Corp., where he specializes in East Asian political and strategic affairs. and
Even in death, Kim Il Sung has reshuffled the deck one final time in the high-stakes drama unfolding among Washington, Seoul and Pyongyang. The delay in the U.S.-North Korean negotiations in Geneva and the indefinite postponement of the first-ever North-South summit once again frustrate international efforts to stymie and reverse Pyongyang's worrisome nuclear activities, buying the embattled North Korean regime additional time for weapons development.
NEWS
July 13, 1994 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When President Clinton expressed condolences to the North Korean people for the death Friday of their president, Kim Il Sung, Republicans lambasted him for insensitivity to the families of the 54,000 Americans killed in the Korean War. "I don't think we sent any condolences when Mao Tse-tung died," sniffed Rep. Newt Gingrich (R-Ga.) this week. But the record shows that is not true. In fact, Gingrich and some other Republicans such as Sen. Bob Dole (R-Kan.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 12, 1994
In a society as closed and as antediluvian as North Korea, it is difficult to believe that the death of the maximum leader will be without significant consequence. Kim Il Sung--the mysterious dictator of a country that time seems to have forgotten in some ways--leaves as his legacy a society all but closed to the outside world and all but strangled by its mindless adherence to a communist orthodoxy that is extreme and bizarre even by the standards of the bygone communist world.
NEWS
July 12, 1994
The funeral of Kim Il Sung, who led North Korea under a Communist system for more than four decades before his death Friday, will be held Sunday in the national capital, but little has been disclosed about the services. The official media so far have announced only that the day will be marked with a gun volley and a three-minute blowing of train and boat whistles.
NEWS
July 12, 1994
It may be a hallowed tradition, but it's far from sacrosanct to the world's cartoonists. Each year, the leaders of Britain, Canada, France, Japan, Germany, Italy and the United States--the Group of Seven--gather in a preferably picturesque spot to discuss Important Issues. An army of journalists records their every move. And the result? Not much in the way of earthshaking news even though the meeting may ease the way to later agreements. This week, the G-7 spectacle played in Naples, Italy.
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