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Kim

ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 2012
First-time feature director Kat Coiro gives an oft-tread story a snappy new spin in the hip and enjoyable comedy "Life Happens. " After underdog Kim (an endearing Krysten Ritter) loses out for the last nearby condom to brasher roommate Deena (Kate Bosworth, also fine) during the BFF's simultaneous one-night stands, Kim ends up a devoted but ill-prepared mother of a baby boy. With the child's me-first, surf star dad (Rhys Coiro, Kat's husband) decidedly absent, Kim must navigate the demands of single motherhood, her thankless job assisting a hellish canine patron (Kristen Johnston)
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 2014 | By Tony Perry
In the 19th century, the British had a phrase to describe their effort to keep Russia from extending its imperial influence through Central Asia and into the crown jewel of the British empire, India. It was called the Great Game, with both sides spying, gathering intelligence and manipulating local leaders and populations to their advantage. Rudyard Kipling used the term in his classic 1901 novel "Kim. " In his new book, "America's Great Game: The CIA's Secret Arabists and the Shaping of the Modern Middle East," Cal State Long Beach history professor Hugh Wilford explains how the same phrase, and many of the same risky tactics, came to describe the post-World War II effort by U.S. operatives to shape the modern Middle East.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 20, 2012 | By Gary Goldstein
The South Korean import "Whatcha Wearin'?" is as sweet and silly and, at times, raunchy as any Hollywood-hatched romantic comedy. Still, even if it's not all that distinguishable from its stateside brethren, the film manages enough sparkly charm and warm comedy to offer a few hours of featherweight fun. The meet-cute here between the recently dumped Hyun-Seung (Ji Sung) and the long-partnered Yun-jung (Kim Ah-joong) involves an accidental phone sex session that's contrived, but also amusing and sexy.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 2011 | Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
It's hard to underestimate the power of an ingénue you enjoy rooting for, and U.K. up-and-comer Felicity Jones is the kind of fresh-faced heroine — equal parts clear-eyed sass and waif-y optimism — who helps make the British romantic comedy "Chalet Girl" more enjoyable than it should be. Jones plays a cash-starved ex-skateboarder named Kim who ditches burger flipping for a winter catering gig at a wealthy family's Swiss chalet. The powdery Alpine terrain is no match in fluffiness, though, for the flag-marked route Tom Williams' screenplay takes, as Kim finds friendship, a renewed sense of achievement and class-mixing romance (cue the bedroom glare of Ed Westwick as the much nicer version of his "Gossip Girl" rich boy, Chuck Bass)
ENTERTAINMENT
September 12, 1997 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
Even in this sexually brazen age, romantic comedies involving transsexuals are not the usual thing. Filmmakers, not surprisingly, aren't rushing to create genial romps about people who've turned to surgery to change their sex because, explains a dictionary, they have "the physical characteristics of one sex but a strong and persistent desire to belong to the other." Which is why the British "Different for Girls" is different for sure.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 2012 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
The original "Taken" may have earned an impressive $224 million-plus in worldwide box office receipts, but it apparently went unseen in one remote corner of Albania. That would be the home base of a group of men who, not knowing any better, feel compelled to menace Bryan Mills and his family one more time in "Taken 2. " Talk about slow learners. Led by taciturn Murad (grizzled veteran Rade Sherbedgia), these men are the blood relatives of the folks master of mayhem Bryan killed back in the day while rescuing his daughter Kim from the clutches of nefarious white slavers in Paris.
SPORTS
September 14, 1985 | DAVE DESMOND, Times Staff Writer
When Jang Kim missed a point-after-touchdown kick in the second quarter, no one thought too much about it. It turned out to be very crucial. The Chaminade kicker's miscue enabled Notre Dame to come away with a 14-13 victory Friday night at Notre Dame in the season opener for both teams. With Chaminade trailing, 7-0, Eagles' wide receiver Randy Schieber caught a three-yard touchdown pass from quarterback Pablo Suarez with 4:40 left in the first half.
NEWS
April 21, 1986 | PAUL OMUNDSON
As architect C.W. Kim gazes out on a magnificent view of the downtown waterfront from his 12th-story office, two of his most distinctive creations loom in the distance: the Hotel Inter-Continental and Columbia Centre. But the images Kim conjures up are vivid memories of his native Chung Buk Province in South Korea, where his parents and two brothers still live. "Lately I've had many dreams of my boyhood in Korea. Maybe that's a sign I will go back," he said.
WORLD
January 27, 2010 | By John M. Glionna
For years, Kim Young Soon said, she struggled with a cruel uncertainty: She didn't know the crime that landed her in Yodok prison, the notorious penal colony in secretive North Korea. One day in 1970,North Korean secret police agents came for Kim and her family: her parents, husband, three sons and daughter. They were taken to the gulag whose mere name stirs terror among many North Koreans. Life under the regime took its toll on Kim's family. Her parents died of hunger at Yodok, she said.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 5, 1997 | John Anderson, John Anderson writes about movies for Calendar
A head-banging bike messenger in a prolonged punk adolescence, romantically involved with a postoperative transsexual. An ex-British Navy man with a homicidal blood-sugar disorder, engaged in an ill-fated affair with a man-eating matron. A shellshocked World War I vet who hears birds speaking Greek. Such is the autumn itinerary of Rupert Graves, the young English actor best known here for playing upper-crusty Brits, usually in E.M.
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