YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsKim


August 14, 2011 | By John M. Glionna, Los Angeles Times
Pity the Chinese food delivery guy on Haeundae Beach as he wanders the mile-long maze of sun umbrellas with haiku-like instructions: "Lifeguard tower 8; third row; three parasols from end; noodles. " Covered end-to-end with multihued parasols that turned the beige sand into a sea of blue, red, white and pink, South Korea's popular summer playground is a beach where people studiously avoid the sun. American businessman Greg Conklin shook his head at the sight: This isn't a public beach; it's another planet.
January 15, 2012 | By John M. Glionna, Los Angeles Times
On his first day of freedom, North Korean defector Kim Yong-chul sat crossed-legged on the floor of a small apartment without a stick of furniture. He ate fried chicken and pork belly, washed down with celebratory shots of soju from a paper cup, toasting the stranger he says saved his life. Krys Lee is no stranger now. The Korean American writer is more like a fussy parent, worrying that the fortysomething refugee was drinking too much and might fall prey to other addictions in South Korea's culture of plenty.
January 10, 2013
Sentimental and jokey until it rains hell on its high-rise-trapped characters, the Korean action epic "The Tower" recalls the heyday of Irwin Allen's '70s reign as the Master of Disaster. When a pair of luxury skyscrapers is set to open with a lavish Christmas party involving helicopters raining snow on partygoers, signs of schematic drama lurk: a kind-faced building manager/widowed father (Kim Sang-kyung) forced to work the party instead of be with his moppet daughter; faulty architecture that a real estate kingpin would rather ignore; a dedicated firefighter (Kang Young-kee)
Krickitt Carpenter perches on her living room couch viewing the wedding videotape and frowns when she sees the bride and groom exchanging vows. "It makes me miss her more and more, the girl in the picture," she says. "I wish I knew what she was thinking--she's just gotten married." For Krickitt, the radiant bride and happy groom in the video are just familiar-looking strangers, shadows of people she once knew. But the people on the videotape are Krickitt and her husband, Kim.
Even in this sexually brazen age, romantic comedies involving transsexuals are not the usual thing. Filmmakers, not surprisingly, aren't rushing to create genial romps about people who've turned to surgery to change their sex because, explains a dictionary, they have "the physical characteristics of one sex but a strong and persistent desire to belong to the other." Which is why the British "Different for Girls" is different for sure.
September 14, 1985 | DAVE DESMOND, Times Staff Writer
When Jang Kim missed a point-after-touchdown kick in the second quarter, no one thought too much about it. It turned out to be very crucial. The Chaminade kicker's miscue enabled Notre Dame to come away with a 14-13 victory Friday night at Notre Dame in the season opener for both teams. With Chaminade trailing, 7-0, Eagles' wide receiver Randy Schieber caught a three-yard touchdown pass from quarterback Pablo Suarez with 4:40 left in the first half.
October 4, 2012 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
The original "Taken" may have earned an impressive $224 million-plus in worldwide box office receipts, but it apparently went unseen in one remote corner of Albania. That would be the home base of a group of men who, not knowing any better, feel compelled to menace Bryan Mills and his family one more time in "Taken 2. " Talk about slow learners. Led by taciturn Murad (grizzled veteran Rade Sherbedgia), these men are the blood relatives of the folks master of mayhem Bryan killed back in the day while rescuing his daughter Kim from the clutches of nefarious white slavers in Paris.
April 21, 1986 | PAUL OMUNDSON
As architect C.W. Kim gazes out on a magnificent view of the downtown waterfront from his 12th-story office, two of his most distinctive creations loom in the distance: the Hotel Inter-Continental and Columbia Centre. But the images Kim conjures up are vivid memories of his native Chung Buk Province in South Korea, where his parents and two brothers still live. "Lately I've had many dreams of my boyhood in Korea. Maybe that's a sign I will go back," he said.
January 27, 2010 | By John M. Glionna
For years, Kim Young Soon said, she struggled with a cruel uncertainty: She didn't know the crime that landed her in Yodok prison, the notorious penal colony in secretive North Korea. One day in 1970,North Korean secret police agents came for Kim and her family: her parents, husband, three sons and daughter. They were taken to the gulag whose mere name stirs terror among many North Koreans. Life under the regime took its toll on Kim's family. Her parents died of hunger at Yodok, she said.
November 17, 1986 | Associated Press
A South Korean announcement of reports that archenemy President Kim Il Sung of North Korea was assassinated brought strong denials from his overseas envoys today but only silence from his communist nation. Pyongyang, the North Korean capital, was said to be calm.
Los Angeles Times Articles