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NEWS
November 10, 1993 | VIRGINIA ELLIS and PAUL JACOBS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Gov. Pete Wilson on Tuesday appointed Kimberly Belshe, an adviser who once handled public relations for the tobacco industry, as the state's new director of health services. Wilson said Belshe, 33, deputy secretary for program and fiscal affairs in the Health and Welfare Agency, would assume the post vacated by Molly Coye, a physician who resigned to become a vice president for a network of hospitals.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 2009 | Eric Bailey
Anti-smoking advocates celebrated Tuesday's 20th anniversary of California's groundbreaking tobacco-control effort by releasing a slew of data showing that cigarette use is continuing its steep decline in the Golden State. Data released by the state Department of Public Health show that smoking rates among adults have declined 41% since voters approved the California Tobacco Control Program, which instituted a 25-cent tax per pack on cigarettes that has funneled 5 cents a pack to tobacco control.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 18, 1993
With a profound sense of anger and sadness, I am writing to describe my frustration with the appointment of Kimberly Belshe as the new director of state health services (Nov. 10). She not only does not deserve that job, but she should be dismissed immediately from any state-financed health post, and Gov. Pete Wilson should be censured for her appointment. The director of the Department of Health Services is in charge of administering the state's complex and costly health programs to all Californians.
OPINION
June 13, 2006
Re "State to Delay Benefit Rule," June 8 The story on California's decision to ignore the federal law requiring those who want free medical care through the Medicaid (Medi-Cal) program to produce proof of citizenship includes two incomprehensible statements. One, attributed to federal and California officials, is that "there is no evidence that many noncitizens are defrauding Medicaid." The other, unattributed, is that "nearly all of the 50 million Medicaid recipients nationally are citizens."
OPINION
June 13, 2006
Re "State to Delay Benefit Rule," June 8 The story on California's decision to ignore the federal law requiring those who want free medical care through the Medicaid (Medi-Cal) program to produce proof of citizenship includes two incomprehensible statements. One, attributed to federal and California officials, is that "there is no evidence that many noncitizens are defrauding Medicaid." The other, unattributed, is that "nearly all of the 50 million Medicaid recipients nationally are citizens."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 2009 | Eric Bailey
Anti-smoking advocates celebrated Tuesday's 20th anniversary of California's groundbreaking tobacco-control effort by releasing a slew of data showing that cigarette use is continuing its steep decline in the Golden State. Data released by the state Department of Public Health show that smoking rates among adults have declined 41% since voters approved the California Tobacco Control Program, which instituted a 25-cent tax per pack on cigarettes that has funneled 5 cents a pack to tobacco control.
NEWS
November 23, 1993 | VIRGINIA ELLIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hoping to mobilize opposition to Gov. Pete Wilson's new health director, anti-smoking advocates began circulating videotapes Monday that show her attacking a department report on the health costs of smoking. On the tapes Kimberly Belshe, a spokeswoman for the tobacco industry's 1988 campaign against Proposition 99, the anti-smoking initiative, suggests that the release of the report by a predecessor, former Health Services Director Dr.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 15, 2003 | Joe Mathews and Tim Reiterman, Times Staff Writers
Gov.-elect Arnold Schwarzenegger continued to fill out his government Friday, nominating a hardened veteran of the health policy battles of Gov. Pete Wilson's administration as secretary of the state's Health and Human Services Agency. S.
NEWS
May 3, 1994 | SHARI ROAN, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
Kimberly Belshe strides through the day-care center in Irvine and spots a group of tots munching on raisins. "That's good!" praises the tall woman in the red blazer as she wags a finger, mommy-style. "Eat your five a day." "Five a day" is the state's campaign to encourage Californians, big and small, to eat at least five servings of fruits and vegetables a day.
NEWS
May 22, 1994
Please inform your readers that the state has not--yet--cut a program that provides prenatal care to undocumented women as reported in the article on Kimberly Belshe, director of the state Department of Health Services ("Tough Choices," May 3). The governor has proposed cutting Medi-Cal coverage of reproductive health services, including prenatal care and family planning, to undocumented women in his 1994-95 budget, but this proposal must still go through the budget process this month and next.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 15, 2003 | Joe Mathews and Tim Reiterman, Times Staff Writers
Gov.-elect Arnold Schwarzenegger continued to fill out his government Friday, nominating a hardened veteran of the health policy battles of Gov. Pete Wilson's administration as secretary of the state's Health and Human Services Agency. S.
NEWS
May 3, 1994 | SHARI ROAN, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
Kimberly Belshe strides through the day-care center in Irvine and spots a group of tots munching on raisins. "That's good!" praises the tall woman in the red blazer as she wags a finger, mommy-style. "Eat your five a day." "Five a day" is the state's campaign to encourage Californians, big and small, to eat at least five servings of fruits and vegetables a day.
NEWS
November 23, 1993 | VIRGINIA ELLIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hoping to mobilize opposition to Gov. Pete Wilson's new health director, anti-smoking advocates began circulating videotapes Monday that show her attacking a department report on the health costs of smoking. On the tapes Kimberly Belshe, a spokeswoman for the tobacco industry's 1988 campaign against Proposition 99, the anti-smoking initiative, suggests that the release of the report by a predecessor, former Health Services Director Dr.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 18, 1993
With a profound sense of anger and sadness, I am writing to describe my frustration with the appointment of Kimberly Belshe as the new director of state health services (Nov. 10). She not only does not deserve that job, but she should be dismissed immediately from any state-financed health post, and Gov. Pete Wilson should be censured for her appointment. The director of the Department of Health Services is in charge of administering the state's complex and costly health programs to all Californians.
NEWS
November 10, 1993 | VIRGINIA ELLIS and PAUL JACOBS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Gov. Pete Wilson on Tuesday appointed Kimberly Belshe, an adviser who once handled public relations for the tobacco industry, as the state's new director of health services. Wilson said Belshe, 33, deputy secretary for program and fiscal affairs in the Health and Welfare Agency, would assume the post vacated by Molly Coye, a physician who resigned to become a vice president for a network of hospitals.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 18, 1996
Both the headline and the premise of "Wilson Seeks Nuclear Waste Shipment Ban" (June 6) are completely wrong. Gov. Pete Wilson has never sought a ban on the exportation of radioactive waste from California. Nor did the Department of Health Services official you quoted ever advocate a ban. What was described as a "ban" was simply a proposal by this official that the Southwestern Low-Level Radioactive Waste Compact Commission, which governs radioactive waste exports, exercise some discretion prior to granting export permits.
OPINION
May 28, 1995
If the findings of Bet Tzedek's study accurately reflect the practices of California's nursing homes, the fact that the Department of Health Services does not receive more complaints about violations of residents' rights is very worrisome ("Rights and the Infirm," May 11). Although the department conducts annual inspections of nursing homes for compliance with residents' rights and other requirements, violations are more often found through the investigations of each and every complaint received about nursing home care.
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