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King Arthur

NEWS
October 31, 1991 | PHILIP BRANDES, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"To be or not to be?" Perhaps the most famous line Shakespeare ever wrote. Instantly you associate it with Hamlet's soliloquy, questioning the fundamentals of his existence. But not so fast. For in this case the speaker on stage is not the melancholy Dane at all, but Merlin, the wizard tutor to young Arthur (of Round Table fame), pondering whether it's nobler to dress in drag to conceal himself amid a host of courtly intrigues.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 6, 1991 | JEANE deCOSTER and DAVID CROOK, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Lords and Ladies, soldiers and peasants: King Arthur is dead. The kingdom is in turmoil. Who you gonna call? In Virgin Mastertronic's "Spirit of Excalibur," Lord Constantine, Arthur's chosen successor, must rally all his knights and save the kingdom from the return of the chaos of the Dark Ages. Steeped in the legend of Arthur, "Excalibur" is a game of strategy and adventure. Five episodes provide increasing levels of difficulty. Each episode provides new and different challenges.
NEWS
April 21, 1991 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This fall, the Family Channel will premiere its 26-episode animated series "The Legend of King Arthur," featuring the voices of Robby Benson, Efrem Zimbalist Jr. and Tim Curry. Also: Family Channel's original series, "The Adventures of the Black Stallion," "Big Brother Jake," "Maniac Mansion," "Rin Tin Tin K-9 Cop" and "Zorro," have been renewed for the fall. Showtime has ordered 13 additional episodes of its wacky comedy series "Super Dave," in its fourth season on the cable network.
TRAVEL
January 28, 1990 | ELINOR LENZ, Lenz is a Los Angeles free-lance writer. and
Camelot is alive and well, tucked away among the ancient hills and jagged cliffs of Cornwall. The magic has been enshrined in Tintagel, a coastal village 275 miles southwest of London in a setting so enchanting that it might have been designed for the artist's palette or the photographer's lens. But to attract a steady, year-round stream of visitors, Tintagel relies not on nature but on romance.
NEWS
January 21, 1990 | MARK TREVELYAN, REUTERS
A ruined castle in wind-swept northern England may mark the birthplace of King Arthur, its owner believes. Farmer Raven Frankland has spent almost 30 years painstakingly restoring Pendragon Castle since buying it at auction for a bargain price in 1963. Amid the tangle of fact and myth surrounding Arthur, he believes Pendragon's claim to the legend is as strong as anywhere else. "It's the legendary home of Uther Pendragon, father of King Arthur," Frankland said.
BOOKS
March 8, 1987 | Terry Atkinson
What someone once called the Arthur Industry goes on, riddling its riddles, presenting myriad solutions, selling books. Unlike two other recent Camelotian exercises, Norma Lorne Goodrich's philological "King Arthur" (Franklin Watts, 1986) and Geoffrey Ashe's archeological "The Discovery of King Arthur" (Anchor/Doubleday, 1985), Richard Barber's slim work isn't theoretical but summary.
NEWS
February 5, 1987 | DENISE HAMILTON, Times Staff Writer
The whole village had come to dinner in hall. There had been boar's head and venison and pork and beef and mutton and capons but no turkey, because this bird had not yet been invented. There had been plum pudding and snap - dragon, with blue fire on the tips of one's fingers, and as much mead as anyone could drink. From "The Once and Future King," by T. S. White.
NEWS
May 18, 1986 | URSULA VILS, Times Staff Writer
At the age of 5, Norma Lorre Goodrich taught herself to read, in her words, by "doping out" "The Idylls of the King." She is still, albeit on a considerably more sophisticated level, "doping out" the life of King Arthur.
NEWS
September 8, 1985 | From Times Wire Services
The legendary King Arthur and his wizard Merlin actually existed, two recent books suggest, although much earlier and in far different form than in medieval romances about Camelot and the Round Table. "The Discovery of King Arthur," by Geoffrey Ashe, contends that Arthur was in reality a king called Riothamus, who is known to have ruled the British and campaigned on the European continent in the middle of the 5th Century, 50 years after the Romans left the British Isles.
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