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King Hussein

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 5, 1988 | ROBERT SATLOFF, Robert Satloff, a fellow at the Washington Institute for Near East Policy, is the author of "Troubles on the East Bank: Challenges to the Domestic Stability of Jordan" (Praeger, 1986)
For a man who has built a reputation on his Darwinian sense of survival, King Hussein's declaration renouncing any territorial claims to the West Bank is chock-full of risks and uncertainties. Almost across the board, analysts agree that Hussein's statements should not be taken at face value.
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OPINION
March 3, 1991 | Michael Emery, Michael Emery is a professor of journalism at Cal State, Northridge. He interviewed King Hussein at the royal palace
For nearly seven months, King Hussein of Jordan has been severely criticized by numerous Western and Arab leaders for his decision to remain neutral in the Gulf War and his refusal to condemn Saddam Hussein. Coalition leaders--particularly the Bush Administration, which had regarded him as a special friend in the Middle East--expected the king to dissociate himself from Saddam Hussein. The Iraqis--Jordan's biggest trading partner--expected the king to emphasize Arab unity.
NEWS
January 20, 1991 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Declaring he could not condemn or condone Iraqi missile attacks on Israel that have placed his nation under threat of war, King Hussein on Saturday urged the world to also consider the ongoing devastation inside Iraq, where "only God knows how many thousands have fallen dead or wounded."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 3, 1992
Embargoes leak. That has been the conventional wisdom at least since the 1930s, when an ineffectual League of Nations tried to ban oil exports to Italy to punish its aggression against Ethiopia. Embargoes leak because when there is money to be made, some will always find ways to get around the barriers that embargoes try to impose, no matter how compelling the moral and political principles behind them.
NEWS
August 8, 1991 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
When King Hussein reopened the doors of Jordanian democracy two years ago, the fundamentalist Muslim Brotherhood's solid showing at the polls sent a political message to the palace. Now the king has sent a message back. At a pivotal moment in Arab-Israeli relations, the king last month appointed Taher Masri, a veteran politician and Palestinian moderate, to head the new government. The fundamentalists could get with Hussein's peace program or take a walk.
NEWS
November 23, 1986 | MICHAEL ROSS, Times Staff Writer
King Hussein of Jordan, breaking his public silence on the supply of U.S. arms to Iran, said in remarks published Saturday that the Reagan Administration's secret dealings with Iran are "incomprehensible" and an "insult to all Arabs." Reflecting what appears to be a growing frustration with U.S.
OPINION
June 16, 1996 | Robin Wright, Robin Wright, author of "Sacred Rage: The Wrath of Militant Islam" (Touchstone Books/Simon & Shuster), covers global issues for The Times
King Hussein bin Talal is the Middle East's leading optimist. Although the Middle East has been the world's most volatile region during the past half century--with five Arab-Israeli wars, two Gulf wars and many border conflicts, civil wars and revolutions--the Jordanian leader has consistently believed real peace with Israel was not only possible but inevitable. He has often defied his Arab brothers to get it.
NEWS
October 21, 1998 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With the Wye Plantation summit approaching what U.S. officials termed the "end game," President Clinton got help in his effort to close the deal Tuesday when Jordan's ailing King Hussein--the Middle East's ultimate survivor--joined the talks.
NEWS
August 14, 1990 | DANIEL WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
King Hussein of Jordan, long identified as a cautious friend of the West, appears to have aligned his country firmly behind Iraq with a speech accusing foreigners of trying to colonize the Arab world. The king told Parliament on Sunday that "the industrialized nations are determined to reshape the map of our region, which contains two-thirds of the world's oil, in a manner that would only serve their own interests." His remarks were not made public until Monday.
NEWS
September 30, 1990 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
Iraqi Foreign Minister Tarik Aziz made a flying visit Saturday to Jordan, a determined peacemaker in the Persian Gulf crisis, but his mission was shrouded in silence. A ranking Jordanian official said only that Aziz had delivered a personal message to King Hussein on "recent developments in the gulf crisis."
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