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November 30, 1991 | SHERYL STOLBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Robert Brown's life began with a tragedy and ended with one. He was born, sickly and underweight, to a drug-addicted transient mother and a father who was in prison. He died this month, just shy of his 2nd birthday, allegedly at the hands of the foster mother who was being paid $345 a month by Los Angeles County to take care of him. Betty Moore, Robert's aunt, believes she could have prevented the death--if only she could have kept the boy.
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OPINION
October 25, 2012
Re "A migration in reverse," Oct. 21 The case of American teenager Luis Martinez and his younger sister, who were taken to Mexico by their grandmother, was not one of children adrift because their parents had been deported. This is the story of a U.S. citizen who, when her husband was deported, took her young grandchildren - U.S. citizens both - to a country where they lacked basic survival skills. This resulted in having to smuggle those children through a desert to return them to their country of origin, where they received assistance from the Mormon Church as well as disability benefits, the same things the grandmother probably would have received had she kept them all in Utah.
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OPINION
December 30, 2009
There are two ways to deal with a wrongheaded federal interpretation of a law meant to help abused and neglected children. Here's one: Remove 16,000 California children from the homes of close relatives and put them in group homes or with foster families, where by most accounts youths suffer more psychological trauma, perform more poorly in school and get into more trouble with the law. Keep them there six months or so. Then apply for funding that Congress...
OPINION
December 30, 2009
There are two ways to deal with a wrongheaded federal interpretation of a law meant to help abused and neglected children. Here's one: Remove 16,000 California children from the homes of close relatives and put them in group homes or with foster families, where by most accounts youths suffer more psychological trauma, perform more poorly in school and get into more trouble with the law. Keep them there six months or so. Then apply for funding that Congress...
OPINION
October 25, 2012
Re "A migration in reverse," Oct. 21 The case of American teenager Luis Martinez and his younger sister, who were taken to Mexico by their grandmother, was not one of children adrift because their parents had been deported. This is the story of a U.S. citizen who, when her husband was deported, took her young grandchildren - U.S. citizens both - to a country where they lacked basic survival skills. This resulted in having to smuggle those children through a desert to return them to their country of origin, where they received assistance from the Mormon Church as well as disability benefits, the same things the grandmother probably would have received had she kept them all in Utah.
NEWS
November 8, 1998 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Stretching her arms as if to encompass her entire brand-spanking-new two-bedroom apartment, 70-year-old Vera Sanders declared that it was time to update the adage that "it takes a village" to raise a child. "Maybe," she mused, "it takes this whole building to raise a grandchild." Sanders and her 14-year-old grandson, John, last month settled into what is thought to be the nation's first subsidized housing for grandparents raising grandchildren.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 21, 2000 | DAVID REYES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Each year, about 300 foster teens in Orange County reach the age of 18 and are "emancipated" into the real world. But freedom has a cost. Typically, the teenagers hold poor-paying jobs, have little or no job history and no credit rating. For landlords, especially in Orange County's tight rental market, those are red flags on any rental application, said Supervisor Cynthia P. Coad, who believes she has a better idea.
NEWS
February 14, 1993 | JOSH GETLIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was just another tragedy in family court. A young crack mother, desperate to conceal her pregnancy, had locked herself in a tenement bathroom and given birth to a three-pound boy. As she pushed, he fell to the floor and broke his skull. The mother abandoned him, like she had two previous babies. All were born addicted to crack. "Can we do anything about this woman?" asks Judge Judith Sheindlin, her voice taut with anger.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 12, 2001 | Tami Min, (714) 966-7410
Free services in education, transportation, recreation and other areas of care-giving will soon be available to those raising relatives' children through the Children's Bureau of Southern California. According to the bureau, the number of children placed with relatives, usually grandparents, represents 38% of the foster-care population in Orange County.
NEWS
July 4, 1993
Grandparents seeking help raising second or third families can turn to: Grandparents as Parents (GAP) 2801 Atlantic Ave. Long Beach 90801 (310) 424-4227 Contact: Edith Nabors * Assn. of African-American Grandmothers 313 N. Figueroa St., Room 227 Los Angeles 90012 (310) 649-4588 Contact: Lois Walters * L.A. County Department of Children's Services Grandparent/Kinship Care Program 3160 W. 6th St.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 21, 2000 | DAVID REYES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Each year, about 300 foster teens in Orange County reach the age of 18 and are "emancipated" into the real world. But freedom has a cost. Typically, the teenagers hold poor-paying jobs, have little or no job history and no credit rating. For landlords, especially in Orange County's tight rental market, those are red flags on any rental application, said Supervisor Cynthia P. Coad, who believes she has a better idea.
NEWS
November 8, 1998 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Stretching her arms as if to encompass her entire brand-spanking-new two-bedroom apartment, 70-year-old Vera Sanders declared that it was time to update the adage that "it takes a village" to raise a child. "Maybe," she mused, "it takes this whole building to raise a grandchild." Sanders and her 14-year-old grandson, John, last month settled into what is thought to be the nation's first subsidized housing for grandparents raising grandchildren.
NEWS
November 30, 1991 | SHERYL STOLBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Robert Brown's life began with a tragedy and ended with one. He was born, sickly and underweight, to a drug-addicted transient mother and a father who was in prison. He died this month, just shy of his 2nd birthday, allegedly at the hands of the foster mother who was being paid $345 a month by Los Angeles County to take care of him. Betty Moore, Robert's aunt, believes she could have prevented the death--if only she could have kept the boy.
NEWS
August 13, 2000 | SANDY BANKS
Gwen Bartholomew was just getting her new business--a supper club in New Orleans--off the ground when the phone call came that brought her back to Los Angeles: Her daughter's boyfriend had been arrested for domestic abuse and social workers had taken their three kids. If Grandma couldn't come for them, they'd wind up in foster homes. She packed a bag--"enough clothes for four days"--and jumped on a plane.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 24, 1996 | ERIN TEXEIRA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Walter Dees' story was a sadly familiar one. Born addicted to crack cocaine, Walter went straight from the hospital delivery room into foster care after his parents were deemed unfit to care for him. He grew into an unmanageable, severely hyperactive child. Social workers said he would probably need heavy medication and state-funded care for a lifetime, unless a miracle happened. Viola Dees was his miracle.
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