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Kirk Franklin

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ENTERTAINMENT
June 11, 2013 | By Greg Braxton
BET has announced a new slate of unscripted series that executives say will showcase stories of revival, redemption and second chances.  The description of the show indicates that the network is focused on providing a more positive spin on African American life than shows such as "Love & Hip Hop" and "Basketball Wives" on VH1, which critics say have featured conflicts and bad behavior among its participants. Among the new BET shows are "Back to Me with Jeanette Jenkins" featuring trainer-to-the-stars Jeanette Jenkins as she "reshapes the lives and bodies of everyday people with her holistic approach to healthy living.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 1, 2013 | By Mikael Wood
On Sunday afternoon -- sandwiched between Beyoncé's Friday-night spectacle at Staples Center and Sunday evening's carefully planned BET Awards -- the gospel star Kirk Franklin made some room for the value of improvisation at the BET Experience. He was at Club Nokia for a show billed as Kirk Franklin & Friends, featuring the Grammy-winning bandleader along with Donnie McClurkin (with whom Franklin toured last year as the King's Men), Karen Clark Sheard, Kierra Sheard and several winners of "Sunday Best," the gospel singing competition Franklin hosts on BET. The goal, as a representative from the network put it in his opening remarks, was to replicate church in the midst of a busy music festival.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 12, 2000 | CONNIE JOHNSON
There's every other gospel artist in the world--and then there's Kirk Franklin. He's just that different. While it's hardly unusual to hear contemporary gospel singers meld a modern, urban beat and flavor with traditional, church-steeped messages, Franklin is the one who does it with the most flair and innovation. Musically, he's up there on a creative rung all by himself.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 11, 2013 | By Greg Braxton
BET has announced a new slate of unscripted series that executives say will showcase stories of revival, redemption and second chances.  The description of the show indicates that the network is focused on providing a more positive spin on African American life than shows such as "Love & Hip Hop" and "Basketball Wives" on VH1, which critics say have featured conflicts and bad behavior among its participants. Among the new BET shows are "Back to Me with Jeanette Jenkins" featuring trainer-to-the-stars Jeanette Jenkins as she "reshapes the lives and bodies of everyday people with her holistic approach to healthy living.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 29, 1995 | STEVE APPLEFORD
Gospel singer Kirk Franklin paced and talked like a man on a mission on Sunday at the Universal Amphitheatre, where he easily earned endless hosannas from the audience for his lively mix of old-style spirituals and modern pop. The 25-year-old Texas minister was a charming and excitable host, leading his 10 singers through sometimes tearful solo turns and pumping new life into familiar Christmas carols.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 1998 | Robert Hilburn, Robert Hilburn is The Times' pop music critic
The official reason that gospel superstar Kirk Franklin is 45 minutes late for an interview is a traffic snarl between his hotel and the Hollywood sound stage where he's also scheduled to tape an episode of the TV show "Motown Live." But the hotel is close enough that you could walk it in 45 minutes, so the more likely reason is that he's just in no hurry to do the interview.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 7, 1996 | Cheo Hodari Coker, Cheo Hodari Coker is a Times staff writer
On a breezy Sunday afternoon, a young man steps from a limousine and heads for the building in Hollywood where he'll spread the word of the Lord to an eager gathering. But Kirk Franklin isn't going to church. The gospel music sensation is standing outside a Paramount Studios sound stage where he'll soon make his first appearance on "Soul Train." To church elders, it might look like enemy territory.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 25, 2007 | Nekesa Mumbi Moody, Associated Press
NEW YORK -- Kirk Franklin has no problem reminding his predominantly Christian audience that he is not the perfect Christian. His gospel tunes often reflect the difficulty of keeping the faith in trying times. He's talked candidly about past struggles with temptation. And asked if he wanted a relationship with his estranged father, he said: "You don't really want to know my answer -- because my answer is going to be very un-Christian."
ENTERTAINMENT
August 17, 2000 | Connie Johnson
Kirk Franklin, "Kirk Franklin Presents 1NC," B-Rite Music. There's a Latin undercurrent to several tracks, and more of a pop/rock angle on others, but that doesn't mean the innovative gospel renegade has watered down his style.
NEWS
February 21, 2002
* Kirk Franklin, "The Rebirth of Kirk Franklin," Gospo Centric. Has some sugary soul-pop, but other passages retain a rousing, tradition-based sound, recruiting stirring gospel voices such as Shirley Caesar and the late Willie Neal Johnson. Also: Code Name: Rocky, "Infinity," Oglio Dan the Automator, "Wanna Buy a Monkey?"
ENTERTAINMENT
September 21, 2012 | By Mikael Wood
It's not easy to outdo Kirk Franklin. A major presence in gospel music since the mid 1990s, Franklin is known for his intensity on stage. He doesn't sing a lot, but as a bandleader in the old-school Cab Calloway mode he does pretty much everything else: dancing, playing piano, acting out his lyrics like the extreme-sports version of a sign-language interpreter. Franklin exercised all those moves (and quite a few more) within the first several moments of his concert Thursday evening at the Gibson Amphitheatre, where he welcomed an enthusiastic crowd by declaring, “My goal tonight is for you to leave stinky.” But he wasn't alone in his quest to cultivate what he called “a spiritual funk.” This was the second date of the King's Men tour, a month-long U.S. trek teaming Franklin with three slightly lower-wattage gospel stars: Israel Houghton, Donnie McClurkin and Marvin Sapp.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 25, 2007 | Nekesa Mumbi Moody, Associated Press
NEW YORK -- Kirk Franklin has no problem reminding his predominantly Christian audience that he is not the perfect Christian. His gospel tunes often reflect the difficulty of keeping the faith in trying times. He's talked candidly about past struggles with temptation. And asked if he wanted a relationship with his estranged father, he said: "You don't really want to know my answer -- because my answer is going to be very un-Christian."
NEWS
February 21, 2002
* Kirk Franklin, "The Rebirth of Kirk Franklin," Gospo Centric. Has some sugary soul-pop, but other passages retain a rousing, tradition-based sound, recruiting stirring gospel voices such as Shirley Caesar and the late Willie Neal Johnson. Also: Code Name: Rocky, "Infinity," Oglio Dan the Automator, "Wanna Buy a Monkey?"
ENTERTAINMENT
August 24, 2000
Dave Alvin, "Public Domain," HighTone. Alvin's set of old folk songs lovingly brought to life demonstrates that human afflictions are never far from the minds of pop artists, whatever the era. (Natalie Nichols) Cubanismo!, "Mardi Gras Mambo," Hannibal. The teaming of this Havana group with ace New Orleans musicians is a natural. Even something as potentially hokey as the Cubanized version of the R&B novelty "Mother in Law" is irresistible fun.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 12, 2000 | CONNIE JOHNSON
There's every other gospel artist in the world--and then there's Kirk Franklin. He's just that different. While it's hardly unusual to hear contemporary gospel singers meld a modern, urban beat and flavor with traditional, church-steeped messages, Franklin is the one who does it with the most flair and innovation. Musically, he's up there on a creative rung all by himself.
BUSINESS
November 18, 1998 | JEFF LEEDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Who owns God's Property? That issue is being contested in dueling lawsuits in federal court filed by the youth choir's director and the record label that released the God's Property debut album. B-Rite Records and director Linda Searight have each staked a claim to the Dallas-based youth choir, which burst onto the pop charts last year and marked gospel as a commercial power. Now the original choir might break up before it even receives a royalty check.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 22, 1999 | MARC WEINGARTEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Y'all ready to get your praise on?" Kirk Franklin asked the crowd Friday, near the beginning of the first of his two Universal Amphitheatre shows. That spirited shout-out, which he used intermittently during his three-hour "Nu Nation" extravaganza featuring the Family, vocalist CeCe Winans, and Trin-I-Tee 5:7, rang out like a mission statement for Franklin, an artist for whom religious faith and booty-bumping are not mutually exclusive.
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