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Kissinger

OPINION
April 14, 1985
There is much truth and sadness in Kissinger's essay. The conclusion that a President cannot conduct a winnable campaign without a proper declaration of war from Congress is persuasive. Everyone must fight a war, not just the soldiers. This basic reaffirmation of our Constitution on the author's part is commendable. However, the other side of the coin, that public debate must be restrained demonstrates that the author, even after a decade of reflection, still does not appreciate American principles.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 11, 1989
It is often said that generals fight the last previous war. Similarly, Kissinger has for years espoused a diplomacy which in its mode and goals is informed by "big power" brokering over spheres of influence which emerged from the Congress of Vienna, reached its zenith in Yalta, and debasement at Helsinki. The utter poverty of that modus vivendi is writ large in the millions of deaths, crushing colonialism and cult of technological destruction witnessed over the last two centuries.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 14, 1987
Kissinger's article reinforces my belief that those who interpret history and current events do so for their own benefit. In the case of Nicaragua, the master juggler has once again made murky what to many people is crystal clear, and holds himself up as the expert to whom we should turn for guidance. The fact of the matter is that Nicaragua is choosing its own destiny. Some of us worry about that; apparently many otheres don't seem the least bit threatened by it. I would venture to say that by far the largest majority of the 50,000 or so U.S. citizens who have visited Nicaragua since 1979 would agree that that country represents no threat to the security of the United States.
OPINION
June 4, 2007
Re "Vietnam's lessons," Opinion, May 31 Henry A. Kissinger attempts to put one over on the American people. As has become an unfortunate norm -- among not only politicians but also the supposed political analysts -- he assumes as premises several conclusions that he makes: that a foreign occupier's puppet government is preferable to one that is openly hostile to that occupier; and that a war entered (or fought) unjustly can nevertheless be brought to a just conclusion. Those premises pose important questions that form the center of what should be a vital debate about how the U.S. positions itself in the world.
OPINION
December 17, 2002
Re "Kissinger Quits as Head of 9/11 Panel," Dec. 14: If Henry Kissinger cannot investigate terrorists because it could create a "conflict of interest" via his business clients, doesn't that imply they might be terrorists? Shouldn't we know who they are? J.B. Thomas Arroyo Grande Kissinger, appointed by President Bush to investigate the horrific events of Sept. 11, does not want to liquidate his lucrative international consulting firm to take the position. At last this patriot's true colors come out. Kissinger's self-interest is more important than our national interest.
NEWS
March 12, 2001
As described in "A Belated Skewering of Henry Kissinger" (Feb. 27), the attacks on Kissinger by Christopher Hitchens and other yes-people for the Old Left prove that the best defense of their sordid ideological enthusiasms is a dirty offense. New scholarship suggests that by late 1972 the Nixon-Kissinger policy had transformed the Indochina war into a potentially winnable proposition for anti-communist regimes in Saigon and Cambodia. Then the Democratic Watergate Congress slashed aid to both governments while the Soviet Union dramatically increased its aid to communist forces.
NEWS
December 15, 1988 | From a Times Staff Writer
American conditions for dialogue with the Palestine Liberation Organization were first outlined by Secretary of State Henry A. Kissinger in 1975, when he sought Israel's approval for a troop separation agreement with Egypt in the Sinai Peninsula, seized by Israel in 1967 and retained during the Arab-Israeli War of 1973. Kissinger promised the Israelis that the United States would never deal with the PLO unless the organization acknowledged Israel's right to exist and accepted U.N.
NEWS
May 2, 1985 | BOB SECTER, Times Staff Writer
The chief Vietnamese negotiator at the Paris peace talks that led to the end of the Vietnam War lashed out at his American counterpart Wednesday, saying that Henry A. Kissinger had lied about alleged North Vietnamese violations of the 1973 peace treaty and had tried to evade responsibility for the breakdown of the pact. Le Duc Tho, now a member of Vietnam's Communist Party Politburo, launched a 15-minute tirade against Kissinger, U.S.
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