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Klamath Basin

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NEWS
September 27, 2001 | From Times Staff Reports
Interior Secretary Gale A. Norton said the administration is weighing proposals to relieve the parched Klamath Basin, following a meeting with Sen. Gordon Smith (R-Ore.). But she stopped short of offering specifics about policy changes or aid that may be on the way. Smith offered her a list of proposals to help the basin that included a breeding program for endangered sucker fish, habitat improvements and water conservation.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 7, 2013 | By Tony Barboza, Los Angeles Times
KLAMATH FALLS, Ore. - For decades this rural basin has battled over the Klamath River's most precious resource: water that sustains fish, irrigates farms and powers the hydroelectric dams that block one of the largest salmon runs on the West Coast. Now, one of the nation's fiercest water wars is on the verge of erupting again. New water rights have given a group of Oregon Indian tribes an upper hand just as the region plunges into a severe drought . Farmers and wildlife refuges could be soon cut off by the Klamath Tribes, which in March were granted the Upper Klamath Basin's oldest water rights to the lake and tributaries that feed the mighty river flowing from arid southern Oregon to the foggy redwoods of the Northern California coast.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 30, 2007 | Eric Bailey, Times Staff Writer
Wading anew into one of the West's fiercest water wars, a scientific panel from the National Research Council said this week that a more comprehensive study needs to be done on the problem-plagued Klamath River Basin. Past studies have focused only on the main river -- which has seen dams and water diversion hurt threatened salmon and suckerfish populations -- ignoring its many tributaries, the panel said in a report.
SCIENCE
November 28, 2009
Walking, cellphones a risky mix Using a cellphone while driving is known to be risky. So perhaps it's not surprising to discover that talking on a cellphone while walking carries its own risks. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign researchers directed 36 subjects, some using cellphones or iPods, to walk on a treadmill in an environment that simulated a busy street. The study, published in the journal Accident Analysis & Prevention, found that the cellphone talkers were much more distracted, crossed the street more slowly and didn't look around as much as the other subjects.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 28, 2002 | ERIC BAILEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Setting up another potential showdown in the Klamath Basin, the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation took steps Wednesday toward adopting a 10-year operating plan that could cut water to endangered fish and give it to farmers. Environmentalists say the biological assessment represents a blunt assault on federal endangered species laws and could push coho salmon and two types of sucker fish toward extinction.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 10, 2003 | Eric Bailey, Times Staff Writer
A federal proposal to provide farmers in the parched Klamath Basin nearly a full ration of irrigation water came under attack Wednesday from environmentalists and other foes who say it could cause a reprise of last year's major fish kill on the Klamath River. The U.S. Bureau of Reclamation plan would provide farmers in the basin straddling the Oregon-California border about 75% of the water they would expect in a normal rainfall year, federal officials said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 7, 2001 | ERIC BAILEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal scientific panel convened here Tuesday in an effort to settle the roiling debate over water cutbacks to drought-stricken Klamath Basin farmers. Like an umpire deciding the fate of a pivotal ballgame, the National Research Council is set to pass judgment on scientific findings that slashed water deliveries because of concerns for endangered fish. "We seek your expertise; we ask your advice," Sue Ellen Wooldridge, U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 29, 2002 | ERIC BAILEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A proposal heralded as a first step by the Bush administration to cure the Klamath Basin's heated water war came under criticism Monday from environmentalists who say it favors farmers over endangered fish. Foes say the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation's draft blueprint for the next 10 years seems motivated by a desire to test the limits of the federal Endangered Species Act, not to help revive sagging fish populations in Upper Klamath Lake and the river downstream.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 16, 2001 | ERIC BAILEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For months, farmers here conducted a hot and caustic war of wits with the federal government over water. Now, with the United States in a real war with a foreign enemy, Klamath Basin farmers have declared a truce. Citing love of country and undying patriotism, protesters have pulled up stakes at the makeshift encampment they established at the head gates of the Klamath irrigation project, which serves a 200,000-acre swath of farmland straddling the Oregon-California border.
NEWS
July 23, 2001 | DEBORAH SCHOCH, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
Gone is the familiar hiss of water through irrigating wheel lines, the hum of tractors and combines and the raucous honking of ducks. Even the whine of mosquitoes is eerily missing. The barley should be hip-high in the field that Gene Haskins tilled like his father and grandfather before him. But his stunted crop barely reaches his knees in dried-up soil.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 18, 2008 | Eric Bailey
A power company has agreed to alter operations at a hydroelectric dam at the mouth of the Klamath River to help endangered fish. Two species of suckerfish have been at the center of a drawn-out water war that pitted environmentalists against farmers in the Klamath Basin, a fertile agricultural region straddling the Oregon-California border. Portland-based PacifiCorp reached a settlement with the environmental group Oregon Wild to shut down power production in the late summer and early fall at the Link River Dam at times when the endangered fish begin congregating nearby in Upper Klamath Lake.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 30, 2007 | Eric Bailey, Times Staff Writer
Wading anew into one of the West's fiercest water wars, a scientific panel from the National Research Council said this week that a more comprehensive study needs to be done on the problem-plagued Klamath River Basin. Past studies have focused only on the main river -- which has seen dams and water diversion hurt threatened salmon and suckerfish populations -- ignoring its many tributaries, the panel said in a report.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 7, 2007 | Eric Bailey, Times Staff Writer
Under the rolling cloud-scape of the Klamath Basin, a curious rite of spring is underway. Migratory birds are flocking to the basin's necklace of federal wildlife refuges straddling Oregon and California -- one of the most important stops on the Pacific Flyway. As usual, the geese, mallards and terns are sharing the sanctuaries with tractors. Agriculture fields have elbowed onto what once were marshes and shallow inland seas, shrinking the basin's wetlands by nearly 80%.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 11, 2005 | Eric Bailey, Times Staff Writer
Facing what is shaping up to be the third-driest year on record along the Klamath River, the federal government has unveiled a plan of water releases that hits both fish and farmers. Irrigators in the fertile Klamath Basin, an agricultural swath straddling the Oregon-California border, will get about 70% of their usual water allotment and are being asked to cut use by an additional 15%. The plan was released Friday.
NEWS
February 3, 2004 | Gary Polakovic
President Bush released a budget Monday that would boost Klamath River Basin spending by 21%. If Congress approves it, the federal government would allocate $105 million for the Klamath next year. The budget proposal includes an extra $16 million for habitat conservation, water banking and wetlands protection. Barriers to salmon migration would be removed and more farmland given to waterfowl and fish. "It's a baby step in the right direction.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 22, 2003 | Eric Bailey, Times Staff Writer
A federal science panel on Tuesday recommended that U.S. wildlife regulators take a far more sweeping approach to prevent extinction of threatened fish in the Klamath Basin, a region racked in recent years by one of the West's most contentious water wars.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 16, 2001 | ERIC BAILEY and BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Sympathizers from throughout the West are heading to the troubled Klamath agricultural region in pickup truck convoys to lend support to water-starved farmers along the Oregon-California border. The convoys, led by veterans of the smoldering fight over federal policies in the West's rural reaches, are fanning worries about the potential for trouble in the drought-plagued area. Convoys originating in Nevada, Montana and even the Malibu beachfront are expected to arrive in Klamath Falls, Ore.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 22, 2003 | Eric Bailey, Times Staff Writer
A federal science panel on Tuesday recommended that U.S. wildlife regulators take a far more sweeping approach to prevent extinction of threatened fish in the Klamath Basin, a region racked in recent years by one of the West's most contentious water wars.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 6, 2003 | Eric Bailey, Times Staff Writer
Hit with allegations that the Bush administration is playing politics in the drought-plagued Klamath River Basin, the U.S. Department of the Interior will investigate whether White House political strategist Karl Rove helped shape a decision to provide more water to farmers at the expense of endangered fish. The probe by the department's inspector general comes at the request of Sen. John F. Kerry (D-Mass.), who is a presidential candidate.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 18, 2003 | Eric Bailey, Times Staff Writer
Stepping squarely into one of the West's most tumultuous water wars, a federal judge on Thursday ordered the Bush administration to revamp a long-term irrigation plan for the drought-plagued Klamath Basin that had been criticized for favoring farmers over fish. U.S.
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