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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 5, 2011 | By Bettina Boxall, Los Angeles Times
The federal government has approved a state plan that calls for significant reductions in pollution from agricultural runoff and dam operations on the Klamath River, setting the stage for a long-awaited cleanup of one of California's major salmon rivers. The new water quality standards are intended to help restore a river once home to bountiful salmon runs but more recently known as a polluted, water-starved battleground for farmers, tribes and salmon fishermen. "It's nice to have a victory like this after so many years of litigation," said Glen Spain, northwest regional director of the Pacific Coast Federation of Fishermen's Assns.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 19, 2013 | By Joseph Serna
The death of a 15-year-old suspected car thief who vanished during a police pursuit in 2011 has been confirmed after authorities successfully matched his DNA to a jawbone found along a riverbed in Northern California, officials said. Cody Edward Conoboy, of Willow Creek, disappeared Jan. 9, 2011, when he and two others bailed from a stolen car in Hoopa, a small town about 60 miles east of Eureka. The vehicle had been reported stolen and soon after it was spotted by a Humboldt County sheriff's deputy driving in the opposite direction, the stolen car's driver lost control and it rolled down the side of Highway 96. One of the passengers was found clinging to a tree along the steep embankment.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 7, 2013 | By Tony Barboza, Los Angeles Times
KLAMATH FALLS, Ore. - For decades this rural basin has battled over the Klamath River's most precious resource: water that sustains fish, irrigates farms and powers the hydroelectric dams that block one of the largest salmon runs on the West Coast. Now, one of the nation's fiercest water wars is on the verge of erupting again. New water rights have given a group of Oregon Indian tribes an upper hand just as the region plunges into a severe drought . Farmers and wildlife refuges could be soon cut off by the Klamath Tribes, which in March were granted the Upper Klamath Basin's oldest water rights to the lake and tributaries that feed the mighty river flowing from arid southern Oregon to the foggy redwoods of the Northern California coast.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 10, 2013 | By Bettina Boxall, Los Angeles Times
Some southern Oregon ranchers will have to reduce or completely shut down irrigation in the parched Upper Klamath Basin this summer as a result of a historic assertion of water rights by other users in the region. On Monday, several groups, including the Klamath Tribes and irrigators in the federal Klamath Project, made formal calls for water, asking Oregon to enforce rights they won earlier this year. "Nobody should be surprised by the tribes making a call," said Jeff Mitchell of the Klamath Tribal Water Team.
NATIONAL
March 1, 2012 | By Kim Murphy, Los Angeles Times
  The once-legendary salmon streams of the Pacific Northwest have been battling steep declines in the celebrated fish for years, and nowhere has the challenge been tougher than on the Klamath River, with salmon struggling to survive the perils of dams, drought and water wars on the river that flows from southern Oregon into California. But in a stunning reversal that state wildlife officials are at a loss to fully explain, nearly 1.6 million chinook salmon, the big, meaty fish most prized by fishermen, are expected to try to make their way into and up the river to spawn this fall.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 25, 2011 | By Bettina Boxall, Los Angeles Times
A $1.4-billion project to remove four hydroelectric dams and restore habitat to return Chinook salmon to the upper reaches of the Klamath River amounts to an experiment with no guarantee of success, an independent science review has concluded. A panel of experts evaluating the proposal expressed "strong reservations" that the effort could overcome the many environmental pressures that have driven the dramatic decline of what was one of the richest salmon rivers in the nation.
NATIONAL
February 28, 2012 | By Kim Murphy
Talk to a fisherman on the West Coast and he'll give you a hard-luck story.  The once-glorious salmon runs of the Pacific Northwest are mostly shadows of what they once were, some threatened with outright extinction, and few rivers have had as many troubles as the Klamath, as it runs from southern Oregon into Northern California. Once the third-most productive salmon river system in the U.S., the Klamath last year saw only about 233,000 fall chinook - the big, meaty salmon prized by fishermen - headed back to spawn.  In 2008, the number was only 68,000.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 10, 2013 | By Bettina Boxall, Los Angeles Times
Some southern Oregon ranchers will have to reduce or completely shut down irrigation in the parched Upper Klamath Basin this summer as a result of a historic assertion of water rights by other users in the region. On Monday, several groups, including the Klamath Tribes and irrigators in the federal Klamath Project, made formal calls for water, asking Oregon to enforce rights they won earlier this year. "Nobody should be surprised by the tribes making a call," said Jeff Mitchell of the Klamath Tribal Water Team.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 25, 2002 | Eric Bailey, Times Staff Writer
SACRAMENTO -- Wading into the Klamath River fight, a California congressman is pushing for $200 million to buy farmland, boost river flows and bankroll conservation measures so more water goes to imperiled fish. Rep. Mike Thompson (D-St. Helena) introduced legislation this week that would provide $20 million for emergency financial assistance to help California Indian tribes and commercial fishermen hit hard by a fish kill late last month that claimed up to 30,000 adult salmon.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 3, 2005 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Officials are warning people to avoid contact with Klamath River water because of dangerous algae blooms. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and North Coast Regional Water Quality Control Board said water samples from the Copco and Iron Gate reservoirs just south of the California-Oregon border show high levels of toxic blue-green algae. Mats of algae also have been found as far as 125 miles downstream on the Klamath River below the dams that create the reservoirs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 7, 2013 | By Tony Barboza, Los Angeles Times
KLAMATH FALLS, Ore. - For decades this rural basin has battled over the Klamath River's most precious resource: water that sustains fish, irrigates farms and powers the hydroelectric dams that block one of the largest salmon runs on the West Coast. Now, one of the nation's fiercest water wars is on the verge of erupting again. New water rights have given a group of Oregon Indian tribes an upper hand just as the region plunges into a severe drought . Farmers and wildlife refuges could be soon cut off by the Klamath Tribes, which in March were granted the Upper Klamath Basin's oldest water rights to the lake and tributaries that feed the mighty river flowing from arid southern Oregon to the foggy redwoods of the Northern California coast.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 2, 2012 | By Maura Dolan, Los Angeles Times
Recreational gold mining using suction dredges along Northern California's Klamath River must be reviewed by federal wildlife officials if threatened coho salmon might be harmed, a federal appeals court ruled Friday. The 7-4 ruling by the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals found that the U.S. Forest Service violated federal endangered species protections by approving the mining practice along the Klamath without consulting wildlife officials. The Klamath starts in southeastern Oregon and empties into the Pacific Ocean about 40 miles south of the California-Oregon border.
NATIONAL
March 1, 2012 | By Kim Murphy, Los Angeles Times
  The once-legendary salmon streams of the Pacific Northwest have been battling steep declines in the celebrated fish for years, and nowhere has the challenge been tougher than on the Klamath River, with salmon struggling to survive the perils of dams, drought and water wars on the river that flows from southern Oregon into California. But in a stunning reversal that state wildlife officials are at a loss to fully explain, nearly 1.6 million chinook salmon, the big, meaty fish most prized by fishermen, are expected to try to make their way into and up the river to spawn this fall.
NATIONAL
February 28, 2012 | By Kim Murphy
Talk to a fisherman on the West Coast and he'll give you a hard-luck story.  The once-glorious salmon runs of the Pacific Northwest are mostly shadows of what they once were, some threatened with outright extinction, and few rivers have had as many troubles as the Klamath, as it runs from southern Oregon into Northern California. Once the third-most productive salmon river system in the U.S., the Klamath last year saw only about 233,000 fall chinook - the big, meaty salmon prized by fishermen - headed back to spawn.  In 2008, the number was only 68,000.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 25, 2011 | By Bettina Boxall, Los Angeles Times
A $1.4-billion project to remove four hydroelectric dams and restore habitat to return Chinook salmon to the upper reaches of the Klamath River amounts to an experiment with no guarantee of success, an independent science review has concluded. A panel of experts evaluating the proposal expressed "strong reservations" that the effort could overcome the many environmental pressures that have driven the dramatic decline of what was one of the richest salmon rivers in the nation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 5, 2011 | By Bettina Boxall, Los Angeles Times
The federal government has approved a state plan that calls for significant reductions in pollution from agricultural runoff and dam operations on the Klamath River, setting the stage for a long-awaited cleanup of one of California's major salmon rivers. The new water quality standards are intended to help restore a river once home to bountiful salmon runs but more recently known as a polluted, water-starved battleground for farmers, tribes and salmon fishermen. "It's nice to have a victory like this after so many years of litigation," said Glen Spain, northwest regional director of the Pacific Coast Federation of Fishermen's Assns.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 13, 2006 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger and Oregon Gov. Ted Kulongoski announced plans Thursday for a multi-state summit to address ways to fix the troubled Klamath River, blamed for nearly shutting down the West Coast commercial salmon season this year. Dams on the river have had a serious effect on salmon and other fish in the river.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 19, 2006 | From the Associated Press
Hundreds of gallons of road sealant spilled into the Klamath River on Friday after a tanker truck overturned near the Oregon state line, authorities said. Between 500 and 1,000 gallons of chip seal -- a tar-like substance used to repair and finish road surfaces -- leaked into the river near Hamburg, a small town 50 miles west of Yreka in Siskiyou County, said Anna Counihan, a California Highway Patrol dispatcher.
NEWS
February 19, 2010
OREGON Pacts could end feuding over river The governors of California and Oregon joined the U.S. secretary of the Interior in Salem to sign two agreements that could officially end decades of feuding over the Klamath River. The Klamath, a major salmon river, was dammed for hydropower nearly a century ago, and its waters were diverted for irrigation. Signed by 30 tribal, conservation and agricultural groups, the agreements call for the removal by 2020 of four hydroelectric dams that have blocked salmon migration on the river, which flows from southern Oregon through Northern California to the Pacific Ocean.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 18, 2009
Pet projects More than $1 billion of the proposed $11-billion water bond is earmarked for projects including: $250 million to remove dams in the Klamath River watershed, mostly for environmental purposes. $120 million for Santa Monica Mountains Conservancy projects, including connecting wildlife habitats and possible purchase of land for open space. $60 million to improve salmon passage in the Sacramento River watershed. $50 million for the state Coastal Conservancy for coastal salmon restoration projects.
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