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Klamath River Basin

NEWS
September 27, 2001 | From Times Staff Reports
Interior Secretary Gale A. Norton said the administration is weighing proposals to relieve the parched Klamath Basin, following a meeting with Sen. Gordon Smith (R-Ore.). But she stopped short of offering specifics about policy changes or aid that may be on the way. Smith offered her a list of proposals to help the basin that included a breeding program for endangered sucker fish, habitat improvements and water conservation.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 25, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
U.S. Sen. Ron Wyden called on financial interests Friday to hold off foreclosures on Klamath Basin farmers who have been denied water this summer, and to give him time to put together legislation to balance agriculture against endangered fish and wildlife.
NEWS
August 9, 2001 | Associated Press
Federal irrigation officials in the drought-parched Klamath Basin worked out a deal Wednesday to buy a little more water for a wildlife refuge that is the winter home to hundreds of threatened bald eagles. Working through a court-ordered mediation process seeking long-range solutions to the basin's water crisis, the U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 26, 2001 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A farmer and a government irrigation official joined in cranking open a valve Wednesday, sending water flowing to Northern California and Oregon farms that withered while water was conserved for endangered fish. Some 200 people cheered as the two men turned a large steel wheel to raise a head gate at Upper Klamath Lake that had been closed since April.
NEWS
July 25, 2001 | DEBORAH SCHOCH, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
Too late to save many farms, Interior Secretary Gale A. Norton promised Tuesday to release some water to fields in the drought-ravaged Klamath Basin amid conflicting reports over whether there's a surplus in Upper Klamath Lake and whether the water is legally committed to imperiled fish.
NEWS
July 23, 2001 | DEBORAH SCHOCH, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
Gone is the familiar hiss of water through irrigating wheel lines, the hum of tractors and combines and the raucous honking of ducks. Even the whine of mosquitoes is eerily missing. The barley should be hip-high in the field that Gene Haskins tilled like his father and grandfather before him. But his stunted crop barely reaches his knees in dried-up soil.
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