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Klamath River

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 28, 2006 | Eric Bailey, Times Staff Writer
A federal judge delivered a stinging defeat Monday to the Bush administration over its decision to reduce flows on the Klamath River, which has been blamed for devastating fish kills and putting the commercial salmon season in jeopardy. U.S. District Judge Saundra B. Armstrong of Oakland ordered the administration's Bureau of Reclamation to return more water to the river in dry years to help ensure that the endangered coho salmon doesn't slide into extinction in the Klamath.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 2006 | Eric Bailey, Times Staff Writer
Aboard his weatherworn fishing boat, Duncan MacLean has pulled a livelihood from the high seas. He takes pride in putting seafood on dinner tables. He loves his workday on the roller-coaster swells. But that storied way of life is at risk for West Coast fishermen. The culprit is a sick river and its dwindling salmon runs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 9, 2006 | Eric Bailey, Times Staff Writer
Facing a salmon shortage on the ailing Klamath River, a fishing advisory board Wednesday sketched out ways to slash this year's West Coast salmon catch that range from cutting the season by more than half to adopting an outright ban. The Pacific Fishery Management Council asked its staff to return Friday with a review of three potential options, all of them met with dismay by fishermen already hard-hit by a shortened 2005 season.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 19, 2005 | Eric Bailey, Times Staff Writer
In a rebuke to the Bush administration on a key environmental battleground, a U.S. appellate court threw out the last vestiges of a federal plan for the Klamath River out of fears it diverted so much water to farms that endangered coho salmon could teeter toward extinction. A three-judge panel of the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals said the president's water plan failed to provide adequate water flows in the river until the final two years of the 10-year plan.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 3, 2005 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Officials are warning people to avoid contact with Klamath River water because of dangerous algae blooms. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and North Coast Regional Water Quality Control Board said water samples from the Copco and Iron Gate reservoirs just south of the California-Oregon border show high levels of toxic blue-green algae. Mats of algae also have been found as far as 125 miles downstream on the Klamath River below the dams that create the reservoirs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 11, 2005 | Eric Bailey, Times Staff Writer
Facing what is shaping up to be the third-driest year on record along the Klamath River, the federal government has unveiled a plan of water releases that hits both fish and farmers. Irrigators in the fertile Klamath Basin, an agricultural swath straddling the Oregon-California border, will get about 70% of their usual water allotment and are being asked to cut use by an additional 15%. The plan was released Friday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 13, 2005 | Kenneth R. Weiss, Times Staff Writer
A federal judge in Oregon has ruled that the federal government erred in placing Klamath River coho salmon on the threatened and endangered species list, but let stand federal protections until the government completes a review this spring. The ruling issued Monday by U.S. District Judge Michael Hogan extends the same legal logic that he used in 2001 to strike down protection for Oregon coastal coho over the lack of genetic distinction between hatchery and wild salmon.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 14, 2004 | Eric Bailey, Times Staff Writer
Resolving to end one of the West's fiercest water wars, the Bush administration forged an agreement Wednesday with Oregon and California to cooperatively solve squabbling over the drought-racked Klamath River. Interior Secretary Gale Norton said the new partnership should help ease tensions among farmers, Indian tribes, environmentalists and fishermen over management of the river, home to endangered coho salmon and two species of suckerfish in Upper Klamath Lake.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 31, 2004 | From Associated Press
The massive 2002 Klamath River fish kill, already counted as one of the nation's largest, could have killed twice as many fish as previously projected, the state Department of Fish and Game said Friday. Commercial fishermen said the larger projected kill could do even more harm to their industry next year, as the offspring of that fall's salmon run begin to return upstream from the ocean. They complained that conditions this year could spark a repeat of the disaster.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 17, 2004 | Eric Bailey, Times Staff Writer
A delegation from some of California's poorest Indian tribes leaves for Scotland today to urge a multinational company to modify six dams that tribal biologists say have contributed to a 90% decline in salmon on the Klamath River. Along with environmentalists and North Coast commercial fishermen, the 18 tribal representatives plan to dramatize their concerns at the July 23 annual general stockholders meeting of ScottishPower. A U.S.
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