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Knott S Berry Farm

NEWS
May 6, 1999 | JACK LEONARD and E. SCOTT RECKARD and DANIEL YI, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Drawn in part by television and radio promotions, tens of thousands of youths converged on Knott's Berry Farm on Wednesday for a Cinco de Mayo celebration, disrupting traffic and commerce and sparking scattered violence until hundreds of riot police restored order. The event's 5-cent admission price was heavily publicized on KIIS-FM, a music station popular among teens, and also promoted on Spanish-language station KMEX-TV.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 25, 1993 | DEBRA CANO
Russell Knott leaned back in a chair behind the desk in his unassuming office at Knott's Berry Farm and reminisced about working on the farm--both in the fields and as general manager of the theme park. Knott, 77, also reflected on the city's first tourist attraction, founded by his late parents, Walter and Cordelia, who had settled in Buena Park nearly 74 years ago.
BUSINESS
May 13, 1999 | E. SCOTT RECKARD, E. Scott Reckard covers tourism for The Times. He can be reached at (714) 966-7407 and at scott.reckard@latimes.com
At Knott's Berry Farm's Cinco de Mayo debacle promoted by KIIS-FM DJ Rick Dees, the rowdy youths were mainly outside the park--those who didn't get in on the 5-cent admission. But a similar promotion at Disneyland for Halloween in 1994 produced not only horrifying gridlock, brawls and frustrated customers outside the Magic Kingdom but a crime wave inside. "It was a nightmare," recalled Deena Ipolito, a sales clerk at the Emporium on Main Street that day.
BUSINESS
October 10, 2009 | Hugo Martin
The Halloween battle of the theme parks has begun. For decades, Knott's Berry Farm's Halloween Haunt has reigned supreme as Southern California's ultimate theme park for Halloween frights. The Buena Park amusement park started the after-hours tradition more than 30 years ago and is credited with inventing the Halloween mazes duplicated by theme parks nationwide. But this year, officials at Universal Studios Hollywood say they are extending that park's Halloween Horror Nights and relying heavily on its movie connections to knock Knott's from its monster perch.
BUSINESS
May 23, 1994 | CHRIS WOODYARD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Half a century ago, the Knott family stapled brief messages to menus in the Chicken Dinner Restaurant in Buena Park. "Patrons please note," they read. "Rumors we have sold out are being persistently circulated. We have NOT, nor is the place for sale." The same kind of rumors, coupled with quick denials, still surface periodically.
BUSINESS
January 3, 2013 | By Hugo Martin
Another classic Southern California theme park attraction is undergoing a major overhaul. Knott's Berry Farm's Timber Mountain Log Ride will close for five months, starting this month, for a renovation of the ride's automated figures and sets and to add new scenes and characters. The log ride, which opened in 1969, is housed in an eight-story building. Riders on log vehicles float in 24,000 gallons of water and glide past mechanical figures and taxidermied animals before dropping down a 42-foot free fall.
NEWS
August 22, 2011 | By Brady MacDonald, Los Angeles Times staff writer
The new 301-foot-tall WindSeeker tower swing ride at Knott's Berry Farm combines the exhilaration and tranquility a bird must feel soaring amid the clouds. The ever-changing view from the lazily spinning ride provides the perspective of a circling hawk hovering on a thermal updraft. Down below, the bustling freeway traffic and suburban sprawl stretch endlessly to the ocean and mountains and beyond to the horizon as the wind whips your hair. > Photos: WindSeeker at Knott's Berry Farm The oft-delayed ride "soft opened" last week and is expected to make its official debut in the coming days.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 14, 1996 | MICHAEL G. WAGNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two animal rights protesters who chained themselves to the dolphin tank at Knott's Berry Farm last year were found guilty of trespassing Friday in Municipal Court in Fullerton. Gina Lynn, 24, of Costa Mesa and her mother, Sherry Trapp, 55, of Buena Park contend they were only trying to educate the public about mistreatment of dolphins at the amusement park when they staged their protest in May 1995.
NEWS
January 5, 1993 | DENNIS ROMERO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Destructo is riding high. He's at the apex of the Knott's Berry Farm Timber Mountain log ride, pinned in a fiberglass tree trunk by a gaggle of screaming girls. It's his birthday, it's 2:30 a.m. New Year's day, and this is his party for 17,254 paying guests--the largest rave yet held in the United States. When he mentioned rave two years ago, he says, "Nobody would listen, not even my mom and dad."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 20, 1999 | From Times staff and wire reports
Knott's Berry Farm will pay more than $13,000 by the end of the week to the city of Buena Park to reimburse it for police overtime and other costs incurred during the park's ill-fated Cinco de Mayo promotion. "We've always reimbursed them for costs," park spokesman Bob Ochsner said. "The only difference is that this wasn't planned." Thousands of teens ditched school May 5 to take advantage of Knott's 5-cent admission price. By 10 a.m.
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