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Knott S Berry Farm

BUSINESS
May 22, 1994 | CHRIS WOODYARD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As a kid, Darrel Anderson and his cousins were the envy of their peers. After all, how many Orange County kids get to grow up on a farm? And not just any farm. Perhaps the most famous of them all--at least in Southern California. "I got to play in Ghost Town," said Anderson, 49, a Lido Island resident and father of three. Nowadays, though, Anderson and his eight cousins have inherited the responsibility that comes with the fun of Knott's Berry Farm.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 9, 1985 | G. M. BUSH
Two former Knott's Berry Farm employees have filed suit in Los Angeles Superior Court, seeking damages for what they said were unfair terminations from the amusement park last August. Billy E. Inman Sr. and Emmett John Meis joined at least two other employees who have filed wrongful-termination suits against Knott's. Their attorney, Stephen L. Belgum, said about 100 longtime employees were terminated without cause on the same day. James E.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 9, 2002 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russell H. Knott, a former general partner of the Buena Park amusement park that bears a family name that is synonymous with Orange County, has died. He was 86. Knott, one of four children of Knott's Berry Farm founders Walter and Cordelia Knott and a longtime philanthropist and community supporter, died Tuesday in a Santa Ana hospital after a stroke. Knott's Berry Farm is the oldest theme amusement park in the nation, drawing 3.7 million visitors a year.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 16, 1989 | Randy Lewis
Did you read about the Knott's Berry Farm people, teaming up with the developers of a shopping mall in Minnesota to create the nation's first combination theme park and retail complex? What they are putting together in Bloomington is a $600-million "Mall of America" that will sprawl over 4.2 million acres and offer up to 800 places to spend your money, everything from major department stores, restaurants, nightclubs and movie theaters to a miniature golf course and a health club.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 14, 1996 | MICHAEL G. WAGNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two animal rights protesters who chained themselves to the dolphin tank at Knott's Berry Farm last year were found guilty of trespassing Friday in Municipal Court in Fullerton. Gina Lynn, 24, of Costa Mesa and her mother, Sherry Trapp, 55, of Buena Park contend they were only trying to educate the public about mistreatment of dolphins at the amusement park when they staged their protest in May 1995.
NEWS
January 5, 1993 | DENNIS ROMERO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Destructo is riding high. He's at the apex of the Knott's Berry Farm Timber Mountain log ride, pinned in a fiberglass tree trunk by a gaggle of screaming girls. It's his birthday, it's 2:30 a.m. New Year's day, and this is his party for 17,254 paying guests--the largest rave yet held in the United States. When he mentioned rave two years ago, he says, "Nobody would listen, not even my mom and dad."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 20, 1999 | From Times staff and wire reports
Knott's Berry Farm will pay more than $13,000 by the end of the week to the city of Buena Park to reimburse it for police overtime and other costs incurred during the park's ill-fated Cinco de Mayo promotion. "We've always reimbursed them for costs," park spokesman Bob Ochsner said. "The only difference is that this wasn't planned." Thousands of teens ditched school May 5 to take advantage of Knott's 5-cent admission price. By 10 a.m.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 12, 1989 | KENNETH WILLIAMS, Kenneth Williams is an editorial assistant in Calendar for The Times Orange County Edition.
Before it was all over, my clothes were a tattered confusion of shredded rags. The left side of my face was a purplish-black swollen mass of ruptured skin. A heavy, black three-inch bolt protruded from my cheek and jagged flaps of torn, blackened flesh oozed sticky rivulets of half-congealed blood. If this sounds like a typical Saturday night scene at the local trauma center, guess again.
BUSINESS
December 30, 1997 | DARYL STRICKLAND, Daryl Strickland covers tourism and small and minority business issues for The Times. He can be reached at (714) 966-5670 and at daryl.strickland@latimes.com
Mickey Mouse Jr. has outdistanced the original Mickey. Disneyland, the Anaheim theme park, has slipped from its perch as the continent's most popular theme park, surpassed by The Magic Kingdom at Walt Disney World in Florida. An estimated 17 million people visited the Magic Kingdom, up 23%, versus 14.2 million at Disneyland, down 5%, or about 700,000 people, according to Amusement Business, a Nashville-based trade journal. Disneyland's attendance declined for a couple of reasons.
BUSINESS
November 3, 1992 | CHRIS WOODYARD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Knott's Berry Farm has frozen the wages of its 3,000 employees because of projections of continued poor attendance, officials said Monday. The attraction, a Buena Park landmark since the 1930s, informed its workers in meetings and a subsequent letter that, for an indefinite time, no raises will be granted. The wage freeze, the first in recent memory, took effect Sunday and applies to all employees, including top management.
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