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BUSINESS
December 4, 2011 | Michael Hiltzik
Like the passing of distinguished individuals, the passing of great corporations should prompt us to ponder the transience of earthly glory. So let's pay our respects to Eastman Kodak, which at this writing appears to be a shutter-click from extinction. Once ranked among the bluest of blue chips, Kodak shares sell today at close to $1. Kodak's chairman has been denying that the company is contemplating a bankruptcy filing with such vehemence that many believe Chapter 11 must lurk just around the corner.
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NEWS
December 27, 2012 | By Michael Ordoña
Paul Thomas Anderson's "The Master" is set in a richly colored, Todd-AO widescreen-feeling America circa 1950, boldly ascending from the horrors of World War II without yet comprehending the trauma incurred. It's a sometimes squeaky-clean surface under which lurks the "animal" nature that the charismatic philosophical leader known as Master (played by Philip Seymour Hoffman) decries, especially in protégé Freddie Quell (Joaquin Phoenix), a troubled Navy veteran. Production designers Jack Fisk and David Crank agree that the key to bringing that era to life in a way that served the story was to keep it out of the museum.
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NEWS
June 24, 2009
Kodachrome: An article in Business on Tuesday about the discontinuation of Kodachrome film misspelled the last name of one of the creators, Leopold Mannes, as Maines.
BUSINESS
January 20, 2012 | By Tiffany Hsu, Los Angeles Times
Eastman Kodak Co.'s grand days as a vanguard American company, responsible for the millions of photos stuffed in family albums and shoe boxes across the country, seemed far away when the company finally filed for a long-expected bankruptcy. But although many knew that Chapter 11 restructuring was coming for the storied brand - long buckling under competitive and technological pressures and liquidity woes - the announcement still left many in a somber mood. "There's a romanticism that everybody feels with Kodak - it's like holding a blank canvas," said Damon Berger, co-founder of the Disrupt/Group production house in Hollywood.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 3, 2011 | By Mark Olsen, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Purporting to be edited from 84 hours of footage recently uploaded to the Internet — by whom, it is not stated — "Apollo 18" would have viewers believe that this is the true story of how NASA and the Department of Defense sent a secret final manned mission to the moon in 1974 after the lunar program had been officially shut down. What the astronauts found there has been kept under wraps ever since. In reality, "Apollo 18" is a faux found-footage thriller directed by Spanish filmmaker Gonzalo López-Gallego from a script by newcomer Brian Miller and produced by Russian filmmaker Timur Bekmambetov.
MAGAZINE
June 8, 1986 | SUNNY GIBBS
The ability to look at the ordinary with extraordinary perception--dramatic composition, ex ceptional lighting and instinctive timing--was the key to success for 15 winners in The Times' 13th annual photography contest. GRAND PRIZE JIM BUCHANAN North Hollywood Right: Buchanan took this shot of beach cottages in Oceanside in late winter. He used Kodachrome 64 in a Canon FTB with an 85mm lens; the exposure was f2.8 for 1/60th of a second.
NEWS
December 27, 2012 | By Michael Ordoña
Paul Thomas Anderson's "The Master" is set in a richly colored, Todd-AO widescreen-feeling America circa 1950, boldly ascending from the horrors of World War II without yet comprehending the trauma incurred. It's a sometimes squeaky-clean surface under which lurks the "animal" nature that the charismatic philosophical leader known as Master (played by Philip Seymour Hoffman) decries, especially in protégé Freddie Quell (Joaquin Phoenix), a troubled Navy veteran. Production designers Jack Fisk and David Crank agree that the key to bringing that era to life in a way that served the story was to keep it out of the museum.
BUSINESS
January 20, 2012 | By Tiffany Hsu, Los Angeles Times
Eastman Kodak Co.'s grand days as a vanguard American company, responsible for the millions of photos stuffed in family albums and shoe boxes across the country, seemed far away when the company finally filed for a long-expected bankruptcy. But although many knew that Chapter 11 restructuring was coming for the storied brand - long buckling under competitive and technological pressures and liquidity woes - the announcement still left many in a somber mood. "There's a romanticism that everybody feels with Kodak - it's like holding a blank canvas," said Damon Berger, co-founder of the Disrupt/Group production house in Hollywood.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 30, 2001 | STEVE LOPEZ
Jason Steinberg, a photojournalism student from Long Beach, was on the way to his Aunt Gail's house in Phoenix for Thanksgiving dinner. While waiting for a Southwest Airlines flight at LAX, Steinberg began taking photographs. "I'm doing a project for class about the aftermath of Sept. 11," says Steinberg, 26, who works as a customer representative at a hospital when he is not at Los Angeles Harbor Community College.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 15, 2009 | By Louis Sahagun
In October 2005, Dave McCoy's friends bought him a digital camera, hoping it would help the founder of the storied Mammoth Mountain ski resort stay active after selling the enterprise to a private investment firm. Instead, McCoy found a new calling. The elder statesman of the California ski industry has been, as he likes to say, "shootin' shots" ever since, exploring the world through zoom lenses with the same enthusiasm and dedication he used to transform the remote mountain into a ski resort that sold for $365 million.
BUSINESS
December 4, 2011 | Michael Hiltzik
Like the passing of distinguished individuals, the passing of great corporations should prompt us to ponder the transience of earthly glory. So let's pay our respects to Eastman Kodak, which at this writing appears to be a shutter-click from extinction. Once ranked among the bluest of blue chips, Kodak shares sell today at close to $1. Kodak's chairman has been denying that the company is contemplating a bankruptcy filing with such vehemence that many believe Chapter 11 must lurk just around the corner.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 3, 2011 | By Mark Olsen, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Purporting to be edited from 84 hours of footage recently uploaded to the Internet — by whom, it is not stated — "Apollo 18" would have viewers believe that this is the true story of how NASA and the Department of Defense sent a secret final manned mission to the moon in 1974 after the lunar program had been officially shut down. What the astronauts found there has been kept under wraps ever since. In reality, "Apollo 18" is a faux found-footage thriller directed by Spanish filmmaker Gonzalo López-Gallego from a script by newcomer Brian Miller and produced by Russian filmmaker Timur Bekmambetov.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 15, 2009 | By Louis Sahagun
In October 2005, Dave McCoy's friends bought him a digital camera, hoping it would help the founder of the storied Mammoth Mountain ski resort stay active after selling the enterprise to a private investment firm. Instead, McCoy found a new calling. The elder statesman of the California ski industry has been, as he likes to say, "shootin' shots" ever since, exploring the world through zoom lenses with the same enthusiasm and dedication he used to transform the remote mountain into a ski resort that sold for $365 million.
NEWS
June 24, 2009
Kodachrome: An article in Business on Tuesday about the discontinuation of Kodachrome film misspelled the last name of one of the creators, Leopold Mannes, as Maines.
BUSINESS
June 23, 2009 | Tiffany Hsu
Paul Simon can kiss his Kodachrome goodbye: Eastman Kodak Co. is discontinuing the storied 74-year-old color film. As photographers gravitated to digital cameras and newer film, Kodachrome sales plunged to less than 1% of Kodak's total film sales. About 70% of the company's revenue now comes from digital sales. Kodachrome labs worldwide have dwindled to just one, Dwayne's Photo in Parsons, Kan., which will offer the service through 2010.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 30, 2001 | STEVE LOPEZ
Jason Steinberg, a photojournalism student from Long Beach, was on the way to his Aunt Gail's house in Phoenix for Thanksgiving dinner. While waiting for a Southwest Airlines flight at LAX, Steinberg began taking photographs. "I'm doing a project for class about the aftermath of Sept. 11," says Steinberg, 26, who works as a customer representative at a hospital when he is not at Los Angeles Harbor Community College.
BUSINESS
June 23, 2009 | Tiffany Hsu
Paul Simon can kiss his Kodachrome goodbye: Eastman Kodak Co. is discontinuing the storied 74-year-old color film. As photographers gravitated to digital cameras and newer film, Kodachrome sales plunged to less than 1% of Kodak's total film sales. About 70% of the company's revenue now comes from digital sales. Kodachrome labs worldwide have dwindled to just one, Dwayne's Photo in Parsons, Kan., which will offer the service through 2010.
TRAVEL
September 5, 1993 | JOHN McKINNEY
There is little doubt how this basin in the slickrock country southeast of Bryce Canyon National Park got its name. The colors of the rocks range from white to gray, with several shades of red. Tints vary dramatically depending upon weather conditions and the angle of the sun. Utah's Kodachrome Basin State Park is a delightful destination for photographers and hikers--even more delightful for hiking photographers, who can get up-close views and wide panoramas of the basin from park trails.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 10, 2001 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, TIMES ART CRITIC
In a riveting 1936 picture of Vivien Leigh, British portrait photographer Madame Yevonde (1893-1975) surrounded the actress with a sparkling sea of intense orange color that crackles against her emerald green jacket. The portrait is lit so that a thin yellow line traces the border that separates these secondary colors, as if Leigh were literally electrified from within. It's an extraordinarily deft use of color as an expressive element.
TRAVEL
September 5, 1993 | JOHN McKINNEY
There is little doubt how this basin in the slickrock country southeast of Bryce Canyon National Park got its name. The colors of the rocks range from white to gray, with several shades of red. Tints vary dramatically depending upon weather conditions and the angle of the sun. Utah's Kodachrome Basin State Park is a delightful destination for photographers and hikers--even more delightful for hiking photographers, who can get up-close views and wide panoramas of the basin from park trails.
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