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Koi

ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 1992 | LYNNE HEFFLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Whoopi Goldberg and composer Herbie Hancock pair up to spin a sprightly African folk tale about the clever son of a chief looking for respect in "Koi and the Kola Nuts," an audio release from Rabbit Ears' "We All Have Tales" series. Hancock composed the eccentric, percussive score; his keyboard wizardry is complemented by African percussionist Bill Summers. Side 2 of the recording is instrumental with strong adult appeal.
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REAL ESTATE
February 25, 1990 | ROBERT SMAUS, TIMES GARDEN EDITOR
They are not fancy or overfed goldfish, though they are distantly related, but a kind of carp, better known by the more elegant Japanese name of koi. Fanciers call them "living jewels" for their bright, often metallic colors, and in a garden pond they indeed sparkle like cut or colored stones in the clear water. Clear water is absolutely essential for keeping koi and is the reason they are not more common in garden ponds.
BUSINESS
February 23, 1990 | MICHAEL CIEPLY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ever since the blue letters spelling Columbia Studios appeared on the gates of the former MGM lot last month, Hollywood has been rife with speculation about Sony Corp.'s supposedly grand plans for the property. At least a few things are clear: Yes, Sony's Columbia Pictures unit envisions some fancy new buildings on the Culver City movie lot that it acquired from Time Warner Inc.--sooner or later.
NEWS
January 27, 1989 | LONN JOHNSTON, Times Staff Writer
The pond churned in a Technicolor boil. Big, gaping fish mouths surged to the surface as Joseph Akiyama cast feed pellets on the water. The splashing increased. The vivid colors of the koi--red, black, white, gold and metallic black--became a blur. "They'll eat a lot," Akiyama sighed, the gurgle of a waterfall at his goldfish farm almost drowning out his soft voice. "It's a good thing their teeth are in their throats," added his wife, Sumie.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 27, 1988 | ERIC BAILEY, Times Staff Writer
If you want to get under Bill Ward's skin, really make him grit his teeth and turn testy, just call them "those big goldfish." Goldfish? Hardly. These fish, which Ward helps raise on a pond-dotted parcel in the rolling hills of Fallbrook, can sell for up to $150,000. They're nurtured like prized racehorses. If they're ill, surgery is sometimes performed. Some have been known to live more than 200 years. No, these aren't something you pick up at a dime store.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 30, 1987 | DENISE HAMILTON, Times Staff Writer
Moved by reports that Descanso Gardens may have lost up to 90 expensive Japanese fish to thieves, a collector said she will donate about 25 brightly colored koi to the Los Angeles County-run arboretum in La Canada Flintridge. "I'm getting to the age where I can't maintain my fish, and I know they'll have a good home at Descanso," said Evelyn O'Neil, a 65-year-old retired nursing assistant from Mission Hills.
NEWS
July 16, 1987 | DENISE HAMILTON, Times Staff Writer
Troubled by the disappearance of 60 expensive Japanese fish, officials at Descanso Gardens have accepted a Norco firm's offer to implant some of the remaining koi with a silicon chip that would provide identification in case of theft. Frank Manwarren, a Glendale resident and sales representative for American Veterinary Identification Services , said he asked his firm to donate the devices after reading about the suspected theft of the fish several weeks ago.
NEWS
July 2, 1987 | DENISE HAMILTON, Times Staff Writer
Something fishy is going on at Descanso Gardens in La Canada Flintridge. Employees say about 60 koi--which look like oversized goldfish and glide gracefully through Descanso's ponds and streams--have disappeared in the past three months. At first, officials suspected that raccoons and blue herons, two natural predators that prowl the Los Angeles County-run gardens, were feasting on the expensive Japanese fish.
NEWS
November 8, 1986 | Paul Dean
American carp are garbage fish good for grinding into gefilte or for denigrating as drowsy targets at bowfishing contests. They eat weeds like underwater lawn mowers. Their flavor is that of a pincushion dipped in Pennzoil. Carp are a palatable food in Europe and Asia, but that's where they also consider monkey brains and thymus glands to be good eating. On the other end of these scales, there's the koi.
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