Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsKon Ichikawa
IN THE NEWS

Kon Ichikawa

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
November 15, 2001 | Kevin Thomas
Among Japanese filmmakers to receive international recognition in the post-World War II era, Kon Ichikawa is today the least-known. Thus, the UCLA Film Archive's "Kon Ichikawa," composed of 18 films screening Saturday through Dec. 9, is a valuable introduction to a major filmmaker whose work has gone largely unseen on local screens since the early '80s. Ichikawa was always more subversive, intransigent and darkly humorous than such peers as Akira Kurosawa, Yasujiro Ozu and Kenji Mizoguchi.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
November 15, 2001 | Kevin Thomas
Among Japanese filmmakers to receive international recognition in the post-World War II era, Kon Ichikawa is today the least-known. Thus, the UCLA Film Archive's "Kon Ichikawa," composed of 18 films screening Saturday through Dec. 9, is a valuable introduction to a major filmmaker whose work has gone largely unseen on local screens since the early '80s. Ichikawa was always more subversive, intransigent and darkly humorous than such peers as Akira Kurosawa, Yasujiro Ozu and Kenji Mizoguchi.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
May 26, 2000 | YURI KAGEYAMA, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Thirty years ago, Akira Kurosawa and three other masters of Japanese film began a project to jointly write and direct a samurai movie. Their "Committee of Four Knights" got bogged down by artistic disagreements and other problems, leaving the film unfinished--and, it seemed, forgotten. But in memory of his three late colleagues, Kon Ichikawa, 84, has resurrected the film.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 26, 2000 | YURI KAGEYAMA, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Thirty years ago, Akira Kurosawa and three other masters of Japanese film began a project to jointly write and direct a samurai movie. Their "Committee of Four Knights" got bogged down by artistic disagreements and other problems, leaving the film unfinished--and, it seemed, forgotten. But in memory of his three late colleagues, Kon Ichikawa, 84, has resurrected the film.
NEWS
February 20, 2008
Ichikawa obituary: The obituary of film director Kon Ichikawa in Monday's California section referred to Japanese director, Keisuke Miyashita. His correct name is Keisuke Kinoshita.
NEWS
May 19, 1996 | Kevin Thomas
This 1956 picture is one of the great anti-war films--and one of the few to evoke a genuine sense of spiritual awakening--it was directed by Kon Ichikawa, who recently remade it. It is set in the final days of World War II in Burma, where a young Japanese soldier (Shoji Yasui, pictured) has embraced Buddhism and become dedicated to burying the dead instead of returning home. A haunting, elegaic reverie of a movie; its opening battle scenes recalling John Ford's cavalry westerns.
NEWS
February 28, 1991 | JOHN NEEDHAM
"The Makioka Sisters" is a splendid, thoughtful movie of a Japan only three years away from Pearl Harbor and the devastation of war with the United States. World War II ended the type of society portrayed so clearly here, although the war did not erase the attitudes and some of the behavior depicted. The barons, counts and others in the nobility were stripped of their titles after the war, and the sharp line between the moneyed few and the scraping-to-get-by many became blurred.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 1990 | KEVIN THOMAS
With "Tora-san, My Uncle" (at the Little Tokyo Cinemas), writer-director Yoji Yamada makes something of a departure in No. 42 in the world's longest-running film series. Usually, Tora (Kiyoshi Atsumi), that short-tempered but kindly and lovable itinerant peddler, plays Mary Worth to an individual or a couple he meets on the road.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 27, 1986
AMERICAN FILMS (in alphabetical order) Atlantic City (Louis Malle) Broadway Danny Rose (Woody Allen) Choose Me (Alan Rudolph) Come Back to the Five and Dime, Jimmy Dean, Jimmy Dean (Robert Altman) Diner (Barry Levinson) Hannah and Her Sisters (Woody Allen) The Killing Fields (Roland Joffe) Once Upon a Time in America (uncut version) (Sergio Leone) Paris, Texas (Wim Wenders) Raging Bull (Martin Scorsese) Stranger Than Paradise (Jim Jarmusch) Tootsie (Sydney Pollack) HONORABLE MENTION The
ENTERTAINMENT
March 16, 1985 | KEVIN THOMAS, Times Staff Writer
How gratifying it is to be able to say that Kon Ichikawa's "Ohan" (at the Kokusai) is one of the finest films of his distinguished but often difficult career. In recent years his darkly comic sensibility had been restricted to witty Gothic horror and detective pictures, but then the director of "The Burmese Harp" (which he is to remake), "Conflagration" and "An Actor's Revenge" made a triumphant return to major films with "The Makioka Sisters."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 1986 | Michael Wilmington and
"16 Days of Glory" played an Oscar-qualifying run in Los Angeles in March, 1985, when it was reviewed by Michael Wilmington. Following are excerpts from that review. The "16 Days of Glory" (Monica 4-Plex) in the film of the same title are the days of last summer's Los Angeles XXIII Olympiad; and they've been recorded in fine style--with pace, passion and authority--by documentarian Bud Greenspan.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|