Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsKoop
IN THE NEWS

Koop

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
September 17, 1987
C. Everett Koop, U. S. surgeon general, will be keynote speaker at a "Workshop on Self-Help and Public Health" at 3 p.m. Sunday in Moore Hall at UCLA. The event, staged by the California Self-Help Center at UCLA, is expected to draw 160 self-help policy makers, researchers and health professionals from across the nation.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NATIONAL
February 25, 2013 | By Marlene Cimons and Noam N. Levey
WASHINGTON - Dr. C. Everett Koop, who as U.S. surgeon general in the 1980s led high-profile campaigns to highlight the dangers of smoking and to mobilize the nation against an emerging AIDS epidemic, has died. He was 96. Koop died Monday at his home in New Hampshire, Susan Wills, a colleague at Koop's Dartmouth Institute, told the Associated  Press. The cause was not given. Unlike his predecessors and many of his successors, who were largely figureheads, Koop initiated a new era of influence for surgeons general by turning the post into a national bully pulpit.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 25, 2013 | By Thomas H. Maugh II and Marlene Cimons, Special to the Los Angeles Times
In the mid-1980s, the emerging AIDS epidemic was a high-profile target of vocal conservatives. Politicians and the religious right called for sweeping measures against those diagnosed with AIDS, including quarantine of patients, mandatory screening of homosexuals for the AIDS virus and a host of other measures that would victimize patients and keep the disease and the diseased hidden from public light. But they did not reckon with Dr. C. Everett Koop, the religious and conservative surgeon general of the United States appointed by President Reagan.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 25, 2013 | By Thomas H. Maugh II and Marlene Cimons, Special to the Los Angeles Times
In the mid-1980s, the emerging AIDS epidemic was a high-profile target of vocal conservatives. Politicians and the religious right called for sweeping measures against those diagnosed with AIDS, including quarantine of patients, mandatory screening of homosexuals for the AIDS virus and a host of other measures that would victimize patients and keep the disease and the diseased hidden from public light. But they did not reckon with Dr. C. Everett Koop, the religious and conservative surgeon general of the United States appointed by President Reagan.
NEWS
June 16, 1989 | MARLENE CIMONS, Times Staff Writer
Departing Surgeon Gen. C. Everett Koop, reflecting on his eight years as the nation's top doctor, promised Thursday that after leaving government he will not abandon any of the causes he has actively and publicly promoted. "I would like someone to say five years from now that when Koop left the office of surgeon general he continued to be the health conscience of the country," he said, speaking in his final meeting with reporters as surgeon general. "I will continue to deliver health messages to this country as long as people will listen."
BUSINESS
May 31, 1989 | From Reuters
Surgeon General C. Everett Koop, concerned about deaths and injuries from drunk driving, today was scheduled to endorse raising taxes on alcoholic beverages and curtailing a major tax break for liquor advertising, informed sources said Tuesday. Koop is also expected to endorse a series of restrictions on the promotion of alcoholic beverages, such as placing health warning labels on alcoholic beverage bottles and prohibiting so-called happy hours, in which drinks are sold at reduced prices during certain times of the day, the sources said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 24, 1986 | United Press International
U.S. Surgeon General C. Everett Koop, who has urged California voters to defeat Proposition 64, is misinformed about the anti-AIDS initiative, Rep. William E. Dannemeyer (R-Fullerton) said Thursday. Koop said Wednesday that the Nov. 4 ballot initiative, which would classify AIDS as a "communicable disease" and bar people who carry the virus from working in schools or handling food, would be "very, very difficult to enforce."
NEWS
January 31, 1987 | MARLENE CIMONS, Times Staff Writer
Education Secretary William J. Bennett and Surgeon General C. Everett Koop Friday reconciled their differences over the Reagan Administration's philosophy on AIDS sex education, ending a divisive battle that had reached the highest levels of the White House. "Our young people deserve the best scientific information about this disease and the ways in which it is transmitted," they said in a joint statement.
NEWS
October 22, 1986 | MARLENE CIMONS, Times Staff Writer
Surgeon General C. Everett Koop, in his long-awaited report to the public on AIDS, calls for AIDS sex education as early as elementary school and opposes compulsory testing for exposure to the virus that causes the deadly disease, The Times has learned. In the report, which is to be released today, Koop rejects proposals to quarantine or tattoo infected individuals.
NEWS
April 27, 1989
As many as 12 million Americans would give up cigarettes if doctors urged their smoking patients to quit and supported those who took the advice, Surgeon General C. Everett Koop said. Koop joined the National Cancer Institute and the American Cancer Society in challenging phynsicians and health professionals to counsel their patients who smoke. Koop and the cancer groups asserted that smokers whose doctors help them quit are perhaps six times more likely to kick the habit for good. Yet the surgeon general said a 1987 survey found that only 49% of smokers reported that their physicians ever advised them to quit.
NEWS
December 4, 2012
Looking for affordable, made-in-L.A. gifts with a handcrafted touch? We picked up these earthenware bowls by Lori + Koop at an artisan show last weekend at the Eagle Rock Center for the Arts. The larger flower bowl with glossy glazed interior and hand-etched matte rim was $35. The smaller bowls with matte white interiors and subtly striped rims were $25 apiece. All are microwave and dishwasher safe. Lori + Koop ceramics are the latest additions to our holiday gift galleries, which we're updating regularly: Gifts with a handcrafted touch Gifts for the home Gifts for the indoor-outdoor gardener Gifts for under $50 Gifts for $50 to $100 Gifts for $100-plus
ENTERTAINMENT
March 1, 2003 | Don Heckman, Special to The Times
It's a common complaint in the jazz world that the audience is graying, and a visit to many jazz venues tends to confirm the gripe. But the perception is distinctly different for those who check out rooms that don't ordinarily cater to jazz and acts that don't fall squarely within the traditional mainstream. The appearance of the Swedish band Koop at the pop-oriented El Rey Theatre on Thursday touched both those points.
BUSINESS
December 17, 2001 | From Reuters
Dr. Koop LifeCare Corp., the troubled Santa Monica-based online health information provider, said on Sunday it would cease operations and liquidate its assets after failing to come up with additional debt or equity financing. One of countless online firms that soared on Wall Street during the 1999 Internet boom, the company said its efforts to obtain additional financing and sell certain assets were unsuccessful, leaving it with little choice but to shut its operations.
HEALTH
December 18, 2000
Regarding "E-Health: Act 2" (Dec. 11): Ego and greed have driven many entrepreneurs into the Internet business. That this space could seduce even [former U.S. Surgeon General] Dr. Everett Koop is testimony to its corrupting power. Dr. Koop, once the symbol of medical trust, has now become representative of self-interested businessmen peddling suspect e-health information. Yes, in Act 1 they did fill the Web with content and links. Unfortunately, they also confused millions of Americans searching for lifesaving knowledge.
HEALTH
June 14, 1999 | MARLA BOLOTSKY
What's in a name? Well, if you're C. Everett Koop, MD, a lot. He's an Ivy League professor, prominent pediatric surgeon and leading proponent of anti-smoking, AIDS awareness, fitness and other public education campaigns. And of course, he's probably the only former U.S. surgeon general most of us remember by name. Enter Drkoop.com. The Web site, http://www.drkoop.
BUSINESS
June 9, 1999 | ASHLEY DUNN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
C. Everett Koop, the stern but grandfatherly surgeon general who preached to the masses through the 1980s to practice safe sex and stop smoking, became a multimillionaire Tuesday by riding the hottest sermon of the 1990s--getting wired. Koop's 11% stake in a consumer health-care Web site called Drkoop.com suddenly became worth $56 million after the Austin, Tex.-based Internet company went public. Drkoop.com Inc., which lost $9 million last year, closed at $16.44 on Nasdaq, up $7.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 7, 1987 | Associated Press
Surgeon General C. Everett Koop says he has been barraged with hate mail from fundamentalist Christians over his report calling for sex education to curb the spread of AIDS. "No conservative Christian leader, no conservative Christian publication, to my knowlege, has been critical of the surgeon general's report or of me, but many constituents of those denominations and movements have been," Koop said this week after appearing on "The 700 Club" on the Christian Broadcasting Network.
NEWS
December 4, 2012
Looking for affordable, made-in-L.A. gifts with a handcrafted touch? We picked up these earthenware bowls by Lori + Koop at an artisan show last weekend at the Eagle Rock Center for the Arts. The larger flower bowl with glossy glazed interior and hand-etched matte rim was $35. The smaller bowls with matte white interiors and subtly striped rims were $25 apiece. All are microwave and dishwasher safe. Lori + Koop ceramics are the latest additions to our holiday gift galleries, which we're updating regularly: Gifts with a handcrafted touch Gifts for the home Gifts for the indoor-outdoor gardener Gifts for under $50 Gifts for $50 to $100 Gifts for $100-plus
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 22, 1998 | TOM BECKER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A firm accused of bilking hundreds of investors out of more than $5 million, in part by using false endorsements from television news anchor Tom Brokaw and former U.S. Surgeon General C. Everett Koop, was shut down Friday following an eight-week investigation by the federal Securities and Exchange Commission. The Central District Court of California issued a temporary restraining order against Intellinet Publishing Inc. in response to a civil suit filed by the SEC.
NEWS
February 16, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
Former U.S. Surgeon General C. Everett Koop said any money from congressional action against tobacco companies should be spent fighting smoking and the diseases it causes rather than research, as President Clinton has proposed. Clinton has suggested boosting science and health research, in particular cancer research. Koop welcomed the prospect of money from tobacco companies to make up for what he said are $100 billion a year in costs to society from smoking, but he urged caution in spending
Los Angeles Times Articles
|