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Koran

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 13, 1997 | LARRY B. STAMMER, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
Ignorance about Islam has been lamented by Muslims and non-Muslims alike as they struggle to open interfaith dialogue in increasingly pluralistic societies. Many non-Muslims know little about Islam beyond that its adherents "pray to Mecca" and that the Koran is its holy book. Islamic leaders hope that a new work by a Los Angeles scholar will make their religion a bit more accessible.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 8, 2000 | ELAINE GALE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On his lap, Muneeb Baig cradled his copy of the Koran, held together with silver duct tape and covered with pencil scrawls. Although the 13-year-old Garden Grove boy hasn't needed to refer to the holy book since this summer when he first recited the Koran by heart, its thick binding and worn, gold-trimmed pages comfort him.
NATIONAL
June 4, 2005 | Richard A. Serrano, Times Staff Writer
The Pentagon late Friday confirmed five incidents of Koran desecration at the prison for detainees at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, wrapping up a high-priority investigation. The findings concluded that one soldier deliberately kicked the Muslim holy book, other guards hit it with water balloons, and a soldier's urine splashed on a prisoner and his Koran. Details of the incidents are contained in the final report of the inquiry headed by Army Brig. Gen.
NEWS
March 30, 1991 | JOHN DART, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
The most widely used English translation of the Koran, Islam's holy book, employs an antiquated prose replete with "thees" and "thous." Yet another popular translation uses colloquialisms so much that Allah tells Adam and Eve to "clear out" of Paradise. Declaring that previous translations "have fallen far short," the president of the Islamic Society of North America this month formally launched a unique project to produce a more relevant Koran complete with commentary.
WORLD
May 22, 2005 | Richard A. Serrano and John Daniszewski, Times Staff Writers
Senior Bush administration officials reacted with outrage to a Newsweek report that U.S. interrogators had desecrated the Koran at the Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, detention facility, and the magazine retracted the story last week. But allegations of disrespectful treatment of Islam's holy book are far from rare. An examination of hearing transcripts, court records and government documents, as well as interviews with former detainees, their lawyers, civil liberties groups and U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 24, 2002 | David Kelly, Times Staff Writer
Sheik Hamad Ibrahim al Hadaad squeezes one eye shut, leans forward and taps a leathery finger against his skull. "I am famous for my sharp memory," he says with a sly grin. "Famous enough to be brought all the way to America." The 75-year-old, barefoot Egyptian rests before prayers in his spartan bedroom at the Islamic Center of the Conejo Valley in Thousand Oaks. Night after night, chapter by chapter, he recites the Koran from memory.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 19, 2005 | Teresa Watanabe, Times Staff Writer
A Culver City woman said Wednesday that a secondhand Koran she ordered through a book dealer working with Amazon.com contained anti-Islamic hate messages, including profanity and "Death to all Muslims!" Azza Basarudin, a 30-year-old UCLA graduate student, said Amazon apologized, sent a new book and offered her a refund and gift certificate.
WORLD
May 28, 2005 | From Associated Press
Muslims spat on the American flag, threw tomatoes at a picture of President Bush and burned the U.S. Constitution in protests Friday from Egypt to Indonesia over the alleged desecration of Islam's holy book at the Guantanamo Bay prison. Waving copies of the Koran, many of the thousands of demonstrators across the Middle East and Asia chanted anti-U.S. slogans and demanded an apology from the United States, as well as punishment for those who had treated the book with disrespect at the U.S.
WORLD
May 18, 2005 | From Times Wire Services
Newsweek should be held responsible for damage caused by violent anti-American demonstrations that followed its now-retracted report about U.S. interrogators desecrating the Koran at the Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, prison camp, an Afghan government spokesman said Tuesday. Pakistan's government spurned the magazine's apology as "not enough," and the White House called for Newsweek to do more to repair the damage to America's image in Muslim nations.
NATIONAL
May 17, 2005 | James Rainey and Mark Mazzetti, Times Staff Writers
Newsweek on Monday retracted an article that said the U.S. military had confirmed that an interrogator at the Guantanamo Bay prison flushed a copy of the Koran down the toilet -- a report blamed for helping to trigger rioting in Afghanistan that killed at least 14 people.
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