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BUSINESS
July 22, 2012 | By Hugo Martin
Let them eat cake, says Korean Air. The Seoul-based airline hopes to sweeten the flying experience by offering free cake and cupcakes to passengers who are celebrating a wedding, honeymoon, birthday or some other special occasion during a flight. The cake service has been offered for months to passengers in Asian markets, and Korean Air recently began promoting the complimentary pastries to U.S. passengers. To get the onboard goodies, passengers must call a Korean Air agent at (800)
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 15, 2014 | By Corina Knoll and Thomas Curwen
What is being billed as the world's largest continuous concrete pour will kick off Saturday afternoon in downtown Los Angeles with a parade featuring concrete trucks, members of the USC marching band, mayor Eric Garcetti and other elected officials. Local bars also plan to feature a drink dubbed “The Longest Pour.” The procession is scheduled to begin just before 4 p.m. and last about 20 hours, said a spokesman for the New Wilshire Grand project , which is slated to rise 1,100 feet and become the tallest structure west of the Mississippi.
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NEWS
April 12, 2011 | By Deborah Netburn, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
Korean Air is about to take duty-free shopping to new heights. The airline plans to equip each of its 10 new A380 planes with duty-free shops at the back of the main flight deck, where passengers can browse lighted cases of makeup, perfume, jewelry, watches and other products. Traditionally, international passengers choose items from duty-free catalogs on board and then purchase them from a cart that flight attendants push down the aisle. The new shop, which Korean Air plans to debut June 10, will function as a "physical catalog" that lets fliers peruse the actual items, said Jon Heath, technical director of AIM Aviation , which designed the shop.
BUSINESS
August 7, 2013 | By Cale Ottens
Dustin House and co-workers spent a recent morning in a massive hole in downtown Los Angeles where the 73-story Wilshire Grand Hotel will soon rise to become the tallest building west of the Mississippi River. As one of the superintendents for the $1-billion project, House - wearing his hard hat, protective sunglasses and work boots - oversees the workers pulling the last bit of concrete from the old Wilshire Grand site, which is in the final stages of demolition this month. But later this year the big job begins as crews start pouring the concrete foundation and working their way up, floor by floor.
BUSINESS
June 24, 2009 | Peter Pae
Slammed by the worst travel slump in decades, the world's largest airlines have been grounding flights, slashing cabin services and pulling out first-class seats. But a South Korean airline -- now one of the busiest foreign carriers at Los Angeles International Airport -- is bucking the industrywide retrenchment by spending money in ways that are raising local eyebrows and puzzling industry observers. In April, Korean Air Lines Co.
BUSINESS
April 17, 1999 | Associated Press
In an abrupt reversal, Delta Air Lines Inc. on Friday suspended its flying partnership with Korean Air Lines, a day after another crash involving the Asian carrier. Two days earlier, Delta had said it stood by the "code-share" arrangement despite the dissemination of an internal Korean Air report raising safety concerns at the carrier. "Delta would not code-share with any carrier it did not believe to be safe," Delta spokesman Clay McConnell said Wednesday.
BUSINESS
July 8, 1999 | James F. Peltz
Responding to growing international concern about its poor safety record, the airline unveiled a $200-million program of "aggressive reforms" to "regain the confidence of the world's traveling community and our alliance partners." The carrier's announcement followed the latest of several published reports, this one in the Wall Street Journal, chronicling a spate of Korean Air accidents in the last two years that often involved pilot error.
NEWS
November 25, 1989 | From United Press International
A Korean Air passenger plane aborted takeoff from Kimpo Airport and crashed in flames today, injuring 47 of the 51 people on board, police said. No deaths were reported, but police said several of the injured were in serious condition at area hospitals with burns and broken bones. Police investigators inspected the scene to determine why the 80-seat, Fokker F-28 jet failed to clear the runway and crashed into a field.
BUSINESS
February 18, 2002 | JAMES F. PELTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After being buffeted by severe safety lapses, the global economic slump and the Sept. 11 crisis, Korean Air believes it's finally heading into blue skies again. South Korea's flagship carrier is predicting a major rebound this year, aided by a management shake-up, an overhaul of Korean Air's safety practices and operating structure, a stout rebound in South Korea's economy, the upcoming World Cup soccer championship in South Korea and Japan, and burgeoning travel by the Chinese. Unlike many U.S.
BUSINESS
October 15, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
The South Korean government has chosen the U.S. firm Sikorsky for a $1-billion joint helicopter production project with Korean Air Lines, a Defense Ministry spokesman said today. "The quality of combat strength in the army will surely be improved by support from helicopters," the spokesman said. The ministry said production of Sikorsky's UH-60 Blackhawk helicopter would also help to develop South Korea's aerospace industry.
NEWS
July 9, 2013 | By Karin Klein
Why wasn't there more chatter in the cockpit of the Asiana Airlines plane shortly before its low and ultimately disastrous landing in San Francisco? Investigators are focusing on why the airliner's approach to the runway was so low; included in that are questions about why the copilot, who reportedly had far more experience flying this type of jet than the pilot, didn't say more about it a lot earlier. We don't need a terribly long memory to be reminded of the serious safety issues that plagued Korean Air for years, and the theory that this was in part caused by cultural-deference issues - in other words, copilots who felt constrained from challenging the pilots because of traditional respect for hierarchy and authority.
BUSINESS
June 26, 2013
1950: Builders break ground July 5 on the Hotel Statler, which opens Aug. 6, 1952. 1954: Hilton Hotels buys the Statler hotel chain. Building is renamed Statler Hilton. 1968: $2.5-million renovation completed in November. Building is renamed Los Angeles Hilton. 1989: Korean Air buys the property for $168 million. Name changes to Omni Los Angeles in 1995. 1999: Name changes to Wilshire Grand Hotel. 2011: Hotel closes in December. 2012: Hotel holds liquidation sale.
BUSINESS
June 26, 2013 | By Cale Ottens
At lunchtime, businessman Joe Wilson likes to check out the action just down the street on Wilshire Boulevard in downtown Los Angeles. It's not the traffic he's watching; it's the slow but methodical demolition of the old Wilshire Grand Hotel at the corner of two of the city's busiest thoroughfares. "Every afternoon when I go out for lunch, I walk by to see what they're doing," said Wilson, who has now seen the hotel reduced to an entire city block of rubble. It's the first step toward construction of a 73-story skyscraper hotel planned for that spot by 2017.
BUSINESS
February 8, 2013 | By Roger Vincent, Los Angeles Times
Ambitious South Korean enterprises continue to make noise on the global economic stage. Electronics giant Samsung is giving Apple fits in markets across the globe with its hot-selling smartphones and tablets. Seoul-based Hyundai and Kia have been among the world's fastest-growing automakers in recent years. Portly singer Psy put South Korea on the pop culture map with his monster hit “Gangnam Style,” which has become the most popular video of all time on YouTube with nearly 1.3 billion views.
BUSINESS
February 7, 2013 | By Roger Vincent
The long-awaited design of a $1-billion hotel and office skyscraper to be built in downtown Los Angeles -- soon to be tallest building in the West -- was unveiled Thursday by developer Korean Airlines. At 73 stories, the tower at Wilshire Boulevard and Figueroa Street will be a dramatic addition to the city skyline and a symbol of South Korea's growing status as a global economic powerhouse. The Wilshire Grand will slightly surpass in height the 72-story U.S. Bank Tower on Bunker Hill that has held the title of tallest west of Chicago since 1989.
BUSINESS
July 22, 2012 | By Hugo Martin
Let them eat cake, says Korean Air. The Seoul-based airline hopes to sweeten the flying experience by offering free cake and cupcakes to passengers who are celebrating a wedding, honeymoon, birthday or some other special occasion during a flight. The cake service has been offered for months to passengers in Asian markets, and Korean Air recently began promoting the complimentary pastries to U.S. passengers. To get the onboard goodies, passengers must call a Korean Air agent at (800)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 2009 | Phil Willon
Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa's effort to put his Million Trees program back on track received some major help Tuesday from Korean Air, which will donate $160,000 over the next four years to help plant trees across Los Angeles. The airline's chairman and chief executive, Yang-Ho Cho, a USC graduate, flew across the Pacific to join Villaraigosa at John H. Liechty Middle School just west of downtown L.A. to kick off the partnership.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 1997
The president and chief executive officer of Korean Air has been elected to the University of Southern California's board of trustees, it was announced Monday. Yang Ho Cho is a 1979 graduate of USC's Marshall School of Business and a member of the graduate program's CEO advisory board. He is also a vice president of the airline's parent, Hanjin Group.
BUSINESS
May 21, 2012 | By Roger Vincent, Los Angeles Times
With work set to begin soon on a $1-billion luxury hotel in downtown Los Angeles, developer Korean Air revealed some details about the tower that is expected to dramatically alter the city's skyline. The skyscraper will be the second-tallest structure in Southern California at 70 stories, only slightly shorter than the US Bank Tower office building, said Yang Ho Cho, the chairman of Korean Air. The design is still a work in progress, but guests are expected to be whisked by high-speed elevators to the lobby on the 70th floor, where they will check in. The top floor will also have a restaurant, bar and infinity swimming pool.
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