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Korean American Grocers Association

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NEWS
May 27, 1992 | PATRICK LEE and PENELOPE McMILLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Widespread skepticism surfaced Tuesday over the announced rapprochement between black gang members and Korean-American merchants, with a spokesman for the business owners saying that proposals to create jobs and secure financing to help rebuild South Los Angeles are still preliminary. Jeong Seo, whose grocery store and liquor market on South Arlington Avenue was destroyed in the riots, said he was "surprised" when he read about the proposed joint ventures in the newspaper.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 14, 2000 | WILLOUGHBY MARIANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An association of Korean American convenience store owners charged Thursday that they are being unfairly targeted by city laws that require them to provide costly security measures at their shops in South-Central Los Angeles. About 30 residents and members of the Korean American Grocers Assn.
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NEWS
July 20, 1992 | ROSE KIM, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
For Annie Cho, the violence that shook the city after the verdicts in the Rodney King beating trial was impossible to keep at a distance. As executive director of the Korean-American Grocers Assn. of Southern California, a 3,500-member trade group, Cho and her staff were deluged with phone calls from panicked storekeepers. At one point, they were forced to flee their office as violence spread into Koreatown. Cho returned the next day to track the damage and to calm merchants.
NEWS
January 2, 1994
The Korean American Grocers' Victims Assn. will host a fund-raising dinner Jan. 18 at the Radisson Wilshire Plaza Hotel, 3515 Wilshire Blvd. The event is a benefit for Korean American store owners whose businesses were damaged or destroyed during the 1992 riots and who have been unable to reopen because of municipal regulations, said Min Paek, the association's executive director.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 25, 1992 | STEPHANIE CHAVEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hoping that service with a smile and "thank you" at the cash register will promote better relations between Korean-American grocers and their customers, a merchants' association announced Friday a 10-point code of behavior to be followed by store owners. The "Good Business Practice Principles" developed by the 3,200-member Korean-American Grocers Assn. were unveiled as black and Korean-American leaders work to ease long-simmering tensions between their communities.
NEWS
January 2, 1994
The Korean American Grocers' Victims Assn. will host a fund-raising dinner Jan. 18 at the Radisson Wilshire Plaza Hotel, 3515 Wilshire Blvd. The event is a benefit for Korean American store owners whose businesses were damaged or destroyed during the 1992 riots and who have been unable to reopen because of municipal regulations, said Min Paek, the association's executive director.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 14, 2000 | WILLOUGHBY MARIANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An association of Korean American convenience store owners charged Thursday that they are being unfairly targeted by city laws that require them to provide costly security measures at their shops in South-Central Los Angeles. About 30 residents and members of the Korean American Grocers Assn.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 30, 1992 | PATRICK LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Leaders of a Korean-American grocers group--who have come under intense criticism in their own community for meeting with gang members--agreed to offer four jobs but little other aid to the gangs in a second set of closed-door talks Friday. Except for the job commitment, participants said, the meeting resulted in few firm agreements despite a series of ambitious proposals put forward by about 10 gang members led by James H. Stern, a minister who operates a gospel theater in Inglewood.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 29, 1992 | PATRICK LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Korean-American community leaders, in a sometimes acrimonious meeting Thursday, strongly criticized the heads of a Korean grocers group for meeting with purported gang members to hammer out a proposed rapprochement. Some participants suggested that the tone of Thursday's meeting makes it unlikely that the grocers will agree to specific proposals from the gang members in follow-up talks today..
NEWS
May 26, 1992 | DAVID FREED and CHARISSE JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Hailing it as a breakthrough in local race relations, a group of Korean-American merchants announced plans Monday to explore a series of ventures in African-American neighborhoods, including hiring black gang members to help manage some Korean businesses. After a closed-door meeting with a handful of gang leaders, officials of the 3,600-member National Korean-American Grocers Assn.
NEWS
July 20, 1992 | ROSE KIM, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
For Annie Cho, the violence that shook the city after the verdicts in the Rodney King beating trial was impossible to keep at a distance. As executive director of the Korean-American Grocers Assn. of Southern California, a 3,500-member trade group, Cho and her staff were deluged with phone calls from panicked storekeepers. At one point, they were forced to flee their office as violence spread into Koreatown. Cho returned the next day to track the damage and to calm merchants.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 30, 1992 | PATRICK LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Leaders of a Korean-American grocers group--who have come under intense criticism in their own community for meeting with gang members--agreed to offer four jobs but little other aid to the gangs in a second set of closed-door talks Friday. Except for the job commitment, participants said, the meeting resulted in few firm agreements despite a series of ambitious proposals put forward by about 10 gang members led by James H. Stern, a minister who operates a gospel theater in Inglewood.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 29, 1992 | PATRICK LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Korean-American community leaders, in a sometimes acrimonious meeting Thursday, strongly criticized the heads of a Korean grocers group for meeting with purported gang members to hammer out a proposed rapprochement. Some participants suggested that the tone of Thursday's meeting makes it unlikely that the grocers will agree to specific proposals from the gang members in follow-up talks today..
NEWS
May 27, 1992 | PATRICK LEE and PENELOPE McMILLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Widespread skepticism surfaced Tuesday over the announced rapprochement between black gang members and Korean-American merchants, with a spokesman for the business owners saying that proposals to create jobs and secure financing to help rebuild South Los Angeles are still preliminary. Jeong Seo, whose grocery store and liquor market on South Arlington Avenue was destroyed in the riots, said he was "surprised" when he read about the proposed joint ventures in the newspaper.
NEWS
May 26, 1992 | DAVID FREED and CHARISSE JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Hailing it as a breakthrough in local race relations, a group of Korean-American merchants announced plans Monday to explore a series of ventures in African-American neighborhoods, including hiring black gang members to help manage some Korean businesses. After a closed-door meeting with a handful of gang leaders, officials of the 3,600-member National Korean-American Grocers Assn.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 25, 1992 | STEPHANIE CHAVEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hoping that service with a smile and "thank you" at the cash register will promote better relations between Korean-American grocers and their customers, a merchants' association announced Friday a 10-point code of behavior to be followed by store owners. The "Good Business Practice Principles" developed by the 3,200-member Korean-American Grocers Assn. were unveiled as black and Korean-American leaders work to ease long-simmering tensions between their communities.
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