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Korean Americans Los Angeles

NEWS
April 29, 1996 | KAY HWANGBO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In April 1992, Young Kim was a 73-year-old native Angeleno who, after a celebrated U.S. Army career that included combat in World War II and Korea, had turned his attention to community affairs. Kyung-Ja Lee, 38, was a filmmaker working on her second movie, a love story between a middle-class Korean woman and a Mexican mechanic in Los Angeles. Kyu M.
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NEWS
April 29, 1996 | K. CONNIE KANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Every morning after Korean American grocer Sung-Ho Joo opens his market, he reaches for the white telephone by the cash register to talk with fellow Korean American riot victims. "It is as if I have to call them to confirm that I am still alive--and they are, too," said Joo, past president of the Korean American Grocers' Victims Assn., an organization of 170 market owners hardest hit by the civil unrest.
NEWS
April 25, 1996 | DON LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Calling it a drastic but necessary step against one of the largest Asian supermarket chains in the Southland, state labor officials ordered the shutdown Wednesday of four California Markets for allegedly violating state labor laws. The state's Division of Labor Standards Enforcement issued "stop orders" at four of six markets in the chain for operating without workers' compensation insurance.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 1996 | K. CONNIE KANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There was pain for friends and family when 81-year-old Dong-Sik Chong was robbed and beaten last Christmas and left unconscious near a downtown freeway exit. There was pain when they learned that still-unexplained police conduct may have played a role. And there was pain last Friday when the old man died.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 15, 1996 | ANDREA FORD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
About 30 black community activists, mobilized by the Brotherhood Crusade, gather outside a South-Central wig shop to condemn the Korean American owners for allegedly refusing to wait on a black man. What really happened after the Rev. Lee May walked into the Accessory House on Vermont Avenue near Slauson Avenue? The story of what led to Tuesday's protest comes in two distinct versions: one claiming racism, the other blaming miscommunication.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 10, 1996
Responding to a controversial arrest, a community group has opened a hotline and free legal clinic to help Korean-speaking victims of police mistreatment. Many monolingual immigrants do not publicly challenge police misconduct because it only means more frustration and humiliation, said K.S. Park, a staff attorney with Korean Immigrant Workers Advocates. The program, which began Thursday, was prompted by the arrest and detention of Korean immigrant Dong-Sik Chong, 81.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 5, 1996 | K. CONNIE KANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Sang-Chul Park was 12 in the spring of 1980, he was shot in the back during a pro-democracy protest in the city of Kwangju, South Korea. Nearly 16 years and 10 operations later, he still suffers from partial paralysis in both legs, an open wound in the back that won't heal and constant pain. Now, with the help of Korean American journalist Tom Byun, Rep.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 27, 1996 | K. CONNIE KANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The cast in a new production of Verdi's "La Traviata," opening Friday at the Wilshire Ebell Theatre, is like no other. It looks like Los Angeles. The rich mix of ethnicities is a dream come true for Korean opera singer Philip Roh, who has long sought to use music as a vehicle to improve race relations. "I think Los Angeles has all the ingredients to make the idea work," said baritone Roh, 43, founder of the Los Angeles Hanmi Opera Company.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 27, 1996 | K. CONNIE KANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The cast in a new production of Verdi's "La Traviata," opening Friday at the Wilshire Ebell Theatre, is like no other. It looks like Los Angeles. The rich mix of ethnicities is a dream come true for Korean opera singer Philip Roh, who has long sought to use music as a vehicle to improve race relations. "I think Los Angeles has all the ingredients to make the idea work," said baritone Roh, 43, founder of the Los Angeles Hanmi Opera Company.
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