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Korean Americans Los Angeles

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 8, 1996 | K. CONNIE KANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Thirteen married couples, unable to have a wedding ceremony because of circumstances ranging from poverty to illness, partook of a festive group rite Saturday thanks to a Koreatown radio station and Korean American businesses. The multiracial group, ranging in age from 22 to 61, renewed their wedding vows inside Radio Korea's history museum, wearing wedding attire donated by 50 Korean American businesses.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 22, 1996 | K. CONNIE KANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A prevalent frustration among Korean Americans is the feeling that African Americans harbor an unfocused resentment against them. Now, an unusual talk show on a Koreatown radio station is giving them a chance to find out first-hand. "Listening to African American Voices," the first Korean-language call-in program of its kind, features a black guest each Wednesday morning in the Koreatown studios of KBLA-AM (1580), better known as Radio Korea.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 22, 1996 | K. CONNIE KANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bringing an uncertain end to yet another urban clash in Los Angeles, a Korean American hat shop owner whose business was picketed in February by the Brotherhood Crusade is closing her South-Central store. "I'm too weary and too afraid to continue," said In-Suk Lee, 53, who operated the Accessory Shop on Vermont Avenue for 13 years and had a small but loyal core of customers who bought perhaps six hats on a good day. Lee hasn't reopened her business since Feb.
NEWS
April 29, 1996 | KAY HWANGBO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In April 1992, Young Kim was a 73-year-old native Angeleno who, after a celebrated U.S. Army career that included combat in World War II and Korea, had turned his attention to community affairs. Kyung-Ja Lee, 38, was a filmmaker working on her second movie, a love story between a middle-class Korean woman and a Mexican mechanic in Los Angeles. Kyu M.
NEWS
April 29, 1996 | K. CONNIE KANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Every morning after Korean American grocer Sung-Ho Joo opens his market, he reaches for the white telephone by the cash register to talk with fellow Korean American riot victims. "It is as if I have to call them to confirm that I am still alive--and they are, too," said Joo, past president of the Korean American Grocers' Victims Assn., an organization of 170 market owners hardest hit by the civil unrest.
NEWS
April 25, 1996 | DON LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Calling it a drastic but necessary step against one of the largest Asian supermarket chains in the Southland, state labor officials ordered the shutdown Wednesday of four California Markets for allegedly violating state labor laws. The state's Division of Labor Standards Enforcement issued "stop orders" at four of six markets in the chain for operating without workers' compensation insurance.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 1996 | K. CONNIE KANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There was pain for friends and family when 81-year-old Dong-Sik Chong was robbed and beaten last Christmas and left unconscious near a downtown freeway exit. There was pain when they learned that still-unexplained police conduct may have played a role. And there was pain last Friday when the old man died.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 15, 1996 | ANDREA FORD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
About 30 black community activists, mobilized by the Brotherhood Crusade, gather outside a South-Central wig shop to condemn the Korean American owners for allegedly refusing to wait on a black man. What really happened after the Rev. Lee May walked into the Accessory House on Vermont Avenue near Slauson Avenue? The story of what led to Tuesday's protest comes in two distinct versions: one claiming racism, the other blaming miscommunication.
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