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Korean Community

ENTERTAINMENT
February 10, 1994
The Los Angeles County Museum of Art has received a $275,000 grant from the Korea Foundation for the museum's "Korean Community Education Project," a three-year outreach program. The project is designed to increase appreciation of Korean art and culture, and to promote cultural understanding and interaction among the city's various populations.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 27, 1994 | KAY HWANGBO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
As soon as word got out that Hyun Sook Lee, an immigrant from Korea, had lost her husband, son and home in the Northridge earthquake, the Los Angeles community of Korean immigrants and their American-born descendants swung into action. * Within days, the 42-year-old Northridge resident had played host to a steady stream of visitors, including the Korean consul general and envoys from several charities. Community members donated thousands of dollars to Lee and her surviving son, Jason.
NEWS
September 26, 1993 | JAKE DOHERTY
Thousands of Korean-Americans turned out last weekend for the 20th annual Koreatown Festival and parade, a celebration of cultural heritage and an expression of community pride, unity and hope. Ardmore Park was transformed into an outdoor market reminiscent of Seoul's giant Namdaemun Market, with tents covering eating stalls filled with Korean favorites, household products and other goods from Korea.
NEWS
June 27, 1993 | GLORIA LAU, Jin Ho Lee is the deputy news manager of KBLA-AM 1580, also known as Radio Korea. He emigrated from South Korea in 1980. A resident of Downtown, Lee has a bachelor's degree in history from Cal Poly Pomona. He was interviewed by Gloria Lau. and
I like to be called a reporter. It's one of the most respected jobs in Korea and all the reporters are proud to be journalists. I am too. We're trying to serve our listeners better--to teach them to become more Americanized. We encourage them to participate in political areas. We encourage our younger generation to be politically ambitious. We tell Korean-Americans to vote and we tell them how to vote and how to acquire citizenship to live in this country.
NEWS
January 31, 1993 | DIANE SEO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At first, it's easy for John Song to appear composed and to speak calmly about the night his printing shop was looted, vandalized and burned to the ground during last spring's riots. Song, a 57-year-old former college professor, explains how he has tried to rebuild but can't because the government will not approve a loan large enough to cover the $200,000 in damage to his Crenshaw business.
NEWS
January 24, 1993 | JAKE DOHERTY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Completed this month in time for the lunar new year, the mural on the southern wall of the Korean Community Center at 981 S. Western Ave. celebrates tradition and hope for better times ahead. The mural, 73 feet long and 64 feet high, features eight colorfully clad figures in a traditional Korean farmers' dance of the kind performed to prepare for the arduous planting season. It's a scene that reminds Dong-In Park, the artist, of the rough row hoed by the city's Korean-American community.
BUSINESS
December 22, 1992
Sharon Bernstein's article (Valley Business, Dec. 8) on the Korean grocers' dilemma illustrates a dilemma faced by generations of Americans before them. While I understand the small-business owners' dismay at the prospect of being undersold by a supermarket, I think they should examine the reasons they or their ancestors came to America--capitalism and the opportunity to do business in a "free market." Now that the market system is about to work against them, they are protesting. Our market system allows anyone who has the capital to open a business.
NEWS
December 20, 1992 | GRACE WAI-TSE SIAO, Daniel H. Kim is a chiropractor at the KOA Medical Center in Koreatown. The 32-year-old Glendale resident immigrated to the United States when he was 10. He was interviewed by Grace Wai-Tse Siao
As a business owner, I'm very concerned that crime in Koreatown has increased since the (April-May) riots. There's always been violence in the city. But before it wasn't directed at any particular group. Now Korean-Americans are seen as easy targets. Because of a lack of security, a lot of people won't come to Koreatown after dark. Consequently business has been down 20% to 25%.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 11, 1992 | KEVIN JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On a sun-splashed boulevard lined with fluttering Korean and American flags, C. J. Edwards' smile nearly circled her head. For years, at home in Victorville, she had read notices in Korean language newspapers about the warmth generated by Orange County's Korean parades and festivals, and she was not about to let the 10th pass without her.
NEWS
August 9, 1992
I wish to thank Garry Abrams for his article on Angela Oh ("Out of Chaos, a New Voice," July 20). This article offers a rare glimpse of a political demigod in the making. Oh gives Abrams several fine examples of the prejudices and bigotry she harbors toward white America. For example, Oh charges that white mainstream America is abandoning Los Angeles because of a fear of diversity. Yet Oh herself admits to a hesitation in returning to Los Angeles from the tranquillity of Northern California.
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