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April 11, 1993 | JAKE DOHERTY
After two weeks of learning about trees, second-graders at Wilton Place Elementary School put their knowledge to use last week, helping plant 10 jacaranda trees in their school's front lawn. The event was the first in the Korean Youth and Community Center's Koreatown Greening Program. "It's good to see more trees around here," said Alex Cordova, 7. The students needed little encouragement as they dug their hands into the soil to break up large chunks and mix in peat moss and compost.
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NEWS
February 19, 1995
Since its beginning as an outreach project for troubled Korean American teen-agers in February, 1974, the Korean Youth and Community Center has undergone as many changes as the culturally diverse neighborhood it serves. The center, which is preparing to celebrate its 20th anniversary Friday, is now the largest Korean American social service organization in the country.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 21, 1992
The Korean Youth Center, the nation's biggest Korean-American service organization, celebrated its 17th birthday Friday by renaming itself the Korean Youth and Community Center at a fund-raiser attended by more than 600 people at the Westin Bonaventure Hotel in downtown Los Angeles.
NEWS
April 11, 1993
The Korean Youth & Community Center is offering a theater arts program designed to encourage Korean-American youths to learn about the performing arts--and discourage them from smoking. Funded by money from the tobacco tax initiative, Proposition 99, and the Los Angeles County Department of Health Services, the free weekly workshops are targeted at Korean-Americans ages 13 to 18, but youths of other ethnic backgrounds are also welcome, said project coordinator Nancy Lee.
NEWS
February 19, 1995
Since its beginning as an outreach project for troubled Korean American teen-agers in February, 1974, the Korean Youth and Community Center has undergone as many changes as the culturally diverse neighborhood it serves. The center, which is preparing to celebrate its 20th anniversary Friday, is now the largest Korean American social service organization in the country.
NEWS
April 11, 1993
The Korean Youth & Community Center is offering a theater arts program designed to encourage Korean-American youths to learn about the performing arts--and discourage them from smoking. Funded by money from the tobacco tax initiative, Proposition 99, and the Los Angeles County Department of Health Services, the free weekly workshops are targeted at Korean-Americans ages 13 to 18, but youths of other ethnic backgrounds are also welcome, said project coordinator Nancy Lee.
NEWS
May 29, 1994
A free workshop designed to help Asian Americans cope with stress in the workplace will be offered from 9:30 a.m. to noon Saturday at the Korean Youth and Community Center, 680 S. Wilton Place. The workshop will be conducted in English and Korean, with simultaneous translation provided through headsets. A panel of experts will discuss workplace stress as it relates to Asian Americans and the effects of stress from the 1992 riots and the Jan. 17 Northridge earthquake.
NEWS
August 7, 1994 | GEOFF BOUCHER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Korean Youth and Community Center is sponsoring a water conservation campaign that allows area residents to trade in their toilets for models that use less water. No fees, taxes or extra charges are attached to the trade-in offer, which allows residents to save money and conserve water. The toilets offered at the center use only about 1 1/2 gallons of water per flush, as opposed to conventional models that use three to five gallons.
NEWS
October 31, 1993 | JAKE DOHERTY
Crime, jobs and education are the top concerns of residents, regardless of ethnicity, in Koreatown, Mid-Wilshire, Westlake and east Hollywood, a coalition of groups and service providers said at a recent community conference. The Coalition of Neighborhood Developers, a multiethnic alliance of more than 50 organizations representing 10 low-income neighborhoods, will come up with a community planning document and organize efforts to address shared problems, coalition members said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 28, 1995
Community members and business owners have joined together to kick off the second year of the Wilshire Enhancement Improvement Program, planting trees in the Wilshire Center/Koreatown neighborhood. The improvement program, a project of the Wilshire Chamber of Commerce, has been responsible for planting about 300 trees in the area. During the next year, youngsters from the Korean Youth and Community Center will do the bulk of the planting, said Gary Russell, executive director of the program.
NEWS
April 11, 1993 | JAKE DOHERTY
After two weeks of learning about trees, second-graders at Wilton Place Elementary School put their knowledge to use last week, helping plant 10 jacaranda trees in their school's front lawn. The event was the first in the Korean Youth and Community Center's Koreatown Greening Program. "It's good to see more trees around here," said Alex Cordova, 7. The students needed little encouragement as they dug their hands into the soil to break up large chunks and mix in peat moss and compost.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 21, 1992
The Korean Youth Center, the nation's biggest Korean-American service organization, celebrated its 17th birthday Friday by renaming itself the Korean Youth and Community Center at a fund-raiser attended by more than 600 people at the Westin Bonaventure Hotel in downtown Los Angeles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 1, 1993
The National Assn. for the Advancement of Colored People, synonymous with advocacy for African-Americans, embraced the diversity of Los Angeles this week when it honored Bong Hwan Kim, a young Korean-American leader, and Edward James Olmos, the Latino actor and community activist. Before--and after--the riots Kim co-chaired the Black Korean Alliance, which worked to repair tense relations between Koreans and African-Americans.
NEWS
July 25, 1993
Starting next month, the Korean Youth and Community Center will offer a job-training program targeting victims of last year's riots and the long-term unemployed through a federal grant called the Community Project for Restoration. KYCC and El Centro del Pueblo, an Echo Park-based organization, will each have 14 job-training slots available for residents of Koreatown, Pico-Union and Hollywood, said Jennifer Chun, KYCC's project manager.
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